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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 81 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 58 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 4, 1863., [Electronic resource] 13 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 12 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Pat Cleburne or search for Pat Cleburne in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
you send or take, as your judgment dictates, Cleburne's division to unite with General Hindman, at ent required by him was impracticable, as General Cleburne was sick, and both the gaps, Dug's and Ca impossible to carry out the part assigned to Cleburne's division. The General commanding desires tarliest hour you can see him in the morning. Cleburne will attack in front the moment your guns areap, to unite in the attack. At the same time Cleburne was directed to remove all obstructions in th the first gun was heard, when the advance of Cleburne's division discovered the enemy had taken advto drive the force in his front until night. Cleburne's division, of Hill's corps, which first reac which my regiment belonged, Smith's brigade, Cleburne's division, was detached and operating with Ggold, but was so handsomely checked by Major-General Cleburne and Brigadier-General Gist, in commandsland—By Captain Beard. 9. Memoir of General Pat Cleburne—By General John C. Brown. Other pape[4 more...]<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
that you send or take, as your judgment dictates, Cleburne's division to unite with General Hindman, at Davismovement required by him was impracticable, as General Cleburne was sick, and both the gaps, Dug's and Catlettnd it impossible to carry out the part assigned to Cleburne's division. The General commanding desires that ythe earliest hour you can see him in the morning. Cleburne will attack in front the moment your guns are hearr Walker's reserve corps to move promptly and join Cleburne's division at Dug gap, to unite in the attack. At the same time Cleburne was directed to remove all obstructions in the road in his front, which was promptly dhat direction. At daylight, I proceeded to join Cleburne at Dug gap, and found him waiting the opening of Hrnoon the first gun was heard, when the advance of Cleburne's division discovered the enemy had taken advantagnued to drive the force in his front until night. Cleburne's division, of Hill's corps, which first reached t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
uth Carolina, of whom General Kershaw wrote so interesting a sketch. [See Vol. 8, S. H. S. Papers, page 186.] Two unknown heroes of the ranks. Our accomplished friend, Colonel Charles H. Olmstead, of Savannah, has furnished us the following incident which is but one of a thousand similar ones which might be given to illustrate the morale of the men who wore the gray: At the time of General Hood's defeat before Nashville, the brigade to which my regiment belonged, Smith's brigade, Cleburne's division, was detached and operating with General N. B. Forrest in the vicinity of Murfreesboro. Hood's retreat in the direction of Columbia placed the enemy on the direct line between our little force and the main body of the army, and in consequence we were obliged to make a wide detour by a forced march across the country to regain our place in our division line. In this march the men suffered terribly, as large numbers of them were barefooted and there were not half a dozen overcoat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
s made for that purpose. During this time they had made several attempts on our extreme right, and had been handsomely repulsed, with very heavy loss, by Major-General Cleburne's command, under the immediate direction of Lieutenant-General Hardee. By the road across the ridge at Rossville, far to our left, a route was opened to d line in the rear, where, by the efforts of my staff, a nucleus of stragglers had been formed upon which to rally. Lieutenant-General Hardee, leaving Major-General Cleburne in command of the extreme right, moved toward the left when he heard the heavy firing in that direction. He reached the right of Anderson's division justmight have some little time to replenish and recuperate for another struggle. The enemy made pursuit as far as Ringgold, but was so handsomely checked by Major-General Cleburne and Brigadier-General Gist, in command of their respective divisions, that he gave us but little annoyance. Our losses are not yet ascertained, but in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
rrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morton, of Nashville, late Chief of Artillery of Forrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer, of Murfreesboro. 8. Prison Experience at Johnson's Island—By Captain Beard. 9. Memoir of General Pat Cleburne—By General John C. Brown. Other papers and addresses will be announced. The meeting will be held during the week of the great competitive drill, and at such hours as not to conflict with that; the railroads will all give reduced rates of fare, and we urge our friends from every section to arrange to be present. our endowment Fund project grows in favor, and we have now every confidence of realizing our goal-afire-proof building for our archives, and at least $100,000 as a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General S. B. Buckner of the battle of Chickamauga. (search)
ton's right, his right receding, forming an obtuse angle with Preston's line. In his front was a heavy breastwork of logs, on the summit of a slight ridge heavily wooded and strongly held by the enemy's infantry and artillery. His right flank was opposite the angle of this work; his centre, facing towards the northwest, was opposed to the flank of the work, which was perpendicular to the road. On Stewart's right, in front of the face of the work, and parallel to the Chattanooga road, was Cleburne's division, of Hill's corps. Brigadier-General Law's brigade, of Hood's division, was in line perpendicular to the road to the left, and slightly in advance of Preston, and close by the burnt house (Poe's), near which was a battery of Hood's artillery. A personal reconnoissance, in company with the Lieutenant-General commanding, showed an advantageous position for artillery in front of Poe's burning house, from which point the enemy's main line, which fronted eastward, and was situated a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
ps charged over an open plain of six hundred yards in width, under a severe fire from the enemy's artillery and infantry, the latter occupying a double line of defences on the brow of an elevation of some fifteen feet. The charge was a brilliant one and was successful, as part of the enemy's line was captured, but it was a fearful loss on our side. The loss of the Confederates, in officers, was unprecedentedly heavy. Eleven General officers were killed and wounded; among the killed were Cleburne, Granberry, Carter and Lewis. The army was thought to have become discouraged by the numerous disasters that had befallen it for many months past, and the officers, on this occasion, seem to have felt it to be their duty to give nerve to their troops by exposing themselves, to an extraordinary extent, to the dangers of the battle. All the field officers remained mounted during the charge. At daylight on the morning after the fight, Lieutenant Ritter rode over the field, and in the par