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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
and desired her to read aloud from it what was marked in pencil with red. It turned out to be Lord Melbourne's trial in the case of Mrs. Norton. She read on for a moment or two, and then casting her eye forward, said, But there are things here, Clement, that are not to be read,—Mais il y a des choses ici, Clement, qui ne se lisent pas. Well, said he, laughing, read us the end at least; let us know what the decision was; you can read that. She turned to it and read the acquittal. The PremierClement, qui ne se lisent pas. Well, said he, laughing, read us the end at least; let us know what the decision was; you can read that. She turned to it and read the acquittal. The Premier made no remark about it, nor did anybody else, though I knew he was very anxious to have another result; but he turned to me, and asked if our laws in America on such matters resembled the English laws, and continued the conversation on this subject till the dinner was over. His dislike of Lord Melbourne's administration is very great and notorious. Mr. Forbes told me that, as British Charge d'affaires at Vienna, he communicated officially to Metternich the fact of its formation, and that