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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 16, 1863., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William I. Clopton or search for William I. Clopton in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
itch horses to the guns, the ammunition in the gun-chests and caissons was examined as to condition, etc., and a report made to the commanding officer, Lieutenant William I. Clopton. As soon as this report was received, the drivers were ordered to mount, and to the command, Forward, march! the battery moved off, the men still wonining a strategic position. A surrender. Before a gun could be fired, however, a man was seen to emerge from the fort, bearing aloft a flag of truce. Lieutenant Clopton and Sergeant-Major Fleming went out to meet the bearer of the flag, quickly followed by several non-commissioned officers and privates. On our men's reachiied: Yes; we noticed the red caps, but some of our men had got to wear them, and other caps, as well. After the articles of surrender had been agreed to, Lieutenant Clopton commanded members of his company who were present to mount the horses and drive the captured guns to camp, and there were no members of that company prouder