Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Lewis P. Clover or search for Lewis P. Clover in all documents.

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opted January 19, 1861. So early as Nov. 30, 1860, Gov. John Letcher, of Virginia, who, as a Douglas Democrat and former anti-Slavery man, was regarded as among the most moderate of Southern politicians, in answer to a Union letter from Rev. Lewis P. Clover, a Democrat of Springfield, Ill., had said: I now consider the overthrow of the Union absolutely certain. South Carolina will secede; and the chain, once broken, is not very likely to be reunited. * * * Unless something shall be speedily done to quiet the apprehensions of the South, the Union is gone beyond all hope. Mr. Clover replied, stating that he had shown Gov. L.'s letter to Mr. Lincoln (who asked Mr. C., whether it was just to hold him responsible for the Personal Liberty bills, etc., which he had never favored), and trusting that the President elect would be found a friend to the South. Gov. Letcher responded (Dec. 25, 1860), saying: I regard the government as now doomed, beyond a contingency, to destructio
Robert E., brings reenforcements against old Brown at Harper's Ferry, 293; takes command( of Rebel forces in Virginia, 518, commands in West Virginia, 525-6. Leeman, Wm. H., killed at Harper's Ferry, 292. Leigh, Benj. Watkins, Comm'r to S. C., 100; 110. Lesesne, Mr., of S. C., favors cooperation, 333. Letcher, John, his politics, etc., 225: his peculiar position as Governor of Virginia, 340; hastes to join the traitors, 342; calls his Legislature together, 348; his letters to L. P. Clover, of Ill., 397; considers New England past forgiveness, 438; his answer to the President's requisition, 459; 465; proclaims the adoption of the Confederate Constitution, 516; proclamation calling out the militia, 516 to 517; his Message on the proceedings in West Virginia, etc., 519. Lewinsville, Va., reoccupied by our army, 620. Lex, Charles E., speech at Philadelphia, 365. Lexington, Mo., a Border Ruffian rendezvous, 283; the siege and battle of, 586 to 589; Col. Mulligan's offi