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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 15: the Maryland campaign. (search)
to send a brigade to the top of Solomon's Gap to cover Kershaw's rear. General Wright, of Anderson's division, was ordered with his brigade and two pieces of artillery along the crest ridge of South Mountain to its projection over Riverton. General Cobb was ordered with his brigade along the base of Elk Ridge, to be abreast of Kershaw's column. With the balance of his command, General McLaws moved down the Valley by the South Mountain road, connecting his march, by signal, with General Kerspping off on both sides, in rocky cliffs of forty or fifty feet, encountered breastworks of logs and boulders, struggled in a severe fight, captured the position, the enemy's signal station, and at four P. M. gained possession of the entire hold. Cobb's brigade was advanced, and took possession of Sandy Hook without serious opposition. The column near South Mountain was advanced to complete the grasp against the enemy at Harper's Ferry. Up to this hour General McLaws had heard nothing direct
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 17: preliminaries of the great battle. (search)
Confederates retreat from South Mountain Federals follow and harass them Franklin and Cobb at Crampton's Pass a spirited action fighting around Harper's Ferry its capitulation the Confed and thirty-three. Rebellion Record, vol. XIX. part i. p. 183. General McLaws had ordered General Cobb's brigade and the other regiments of Mahone's to reinforce the troops at the gap, but they onudden onslaught is evident from the assurances made him by the cavalry commander. His orders for Cobb were severe enough, but Franklin was too prompt to allow Cobb to get to work. Upon hearing the nCobb to get to work. Upon hearing the noise of battle, he followed his orders, riding with General Stuart, but the game was played before he could take part in it. Night came and gave him time to organize his forces for the next day. Had t But cavalry commanders do not always post artillery and infantry to greatest advantage. General Cobb made worthy effort to arrest the retreat and reorganize the forces, but was not able to fix a
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 18: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam. (search)
k to belong to Mansfield's command. In the mean time General Mansfield had been killed, and a portion of his corps (formerly Banks's) had also been thrown into confusion. Report of Committee, part i. p. 368. He passed Greene's brigade of the Twelfth, and marched through the wood, leaving the Dunker chapel on his left. As McLaws approached, General Hood was sent to give him careful instructions of the posture, of the grounds, and the impending crisis. He marched with his brigades, --Cobb's, Kershaw's, Semmes's, and Barksdale's. The leading brigade filed to the right, before the approaching march. Kershaw's leading regiment filed into line as Sedgwick's column approached the south side of the Dunker chapel wood,--the latter on a diagonal march,while Kershaw's regiment was in fair front against it. Relative positions of McLaws and other Confederates and Sedgwick at their opening. The regiment opened prompt fire, and the other regiments came into line in double time, opening
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
. A, Capt. William Hexamer; 2d U. S., Batt. D, Lieut. Edward B. Williston. Second Division, Maj.-Gen. William F. Smith:--First Brigade, (1) Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, Assigned to First Division, Second Army Corps, September 17. (2) Col. Amasa Cobb; 6th Me., Col. Hiram Burnham; 43d N. Y., Maj. John Wilson; 49th Pa., Lieut.-Col. William Brisbane; 137th Pa., Col. Henry M. Bossert; 5th Wis., Col. Amasa Cobb. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. H. Brooks; 2d Vt., Maj. James H. Walbridge; 3d VCol. Amasa Cobb. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. H. Brooks; 2d Vt., Maj. James H. Walbridge; 3d Vt., Col. Breed N. Hyde; 4th Vt., Lieut.-Col. Charles B. Stoughton; 5th Vt., Col. Lewis A. Grant; 6th Vt., Maj. Oscar L. Tuttle. Third Brigade, Col. William H. Irwin; 7th Me., Maj. Thomas W. Hyde; 20th N. Y., Col. Ernest von Vegesack; 33d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Joseph W. Corning; 49th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William C. Alberger, Maj. George W. Johnson; 77th N. Y., Capt. Nathan S. Babcock. Artillery, Capt. Romeyn B. Ayres; Md. Light, Batt. B, Lieut. Theodore J. Vanneman; N. Y. Light, 1st Batt., Capt. Andr
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
he Tenth, Fifty-first, and Fifty-third Georgia are given as reported for June 22 and July 31. Manning reported in command of Fiftieth Georgia, June 22. No commander reported on return for July 31. Brig.-Gen. . P. J. Semmes, Col. Goode Bryan; 10th Ga., Col. John B. Weems; 50th Ga., Col. W. R. Manning; 51st Ga., Col. E. Ball; 53d Ga., Col. James P. Simms. Wofford's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. Wofford; 16th Ga., Col. Goode Bryan ; 18th Ga., Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff; 24th Ga., Col. Robert McMillan; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. Luther J. Glenn; Phillips (Ga.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. E. S. Barclay. Artillery, Col. H. C. Cabell; 1st N. C. Art., Batt. A, Capt. B. C. Manly; Pulaski (Ga.) Art., Capt. J. C. Fraser, Lieut. W. J. Furlong; 1st Richmond Howitzers, Capt. E. S. McCarthy; Troup (Ga.) Art., Capt. H. H. Carlton, Lieut. C. W. Motes. Pickett's division, Maj.-Gen. George E. Pickett:--Garnett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. B. Garnett, Maj. C. S. Peyton; 8th Va., Col. Eppa Hunton; 18th Va., Lieut.
The schooner has on board the former mate Mr. James L. Wilson of Virginia, who was a sergeant in an artillery corps attached to the secession army.--N. Y. Tribune, August 1. To-day an ordinance passed the Cincinnati (Ohio) City Council, to appropriate the sum of $23,000 to loan the Hamilton County commissioners for the purpose of relieving the wives and families of the volunteers.--Louisville Journal, August 2. The Fifth Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers, under the command of Colonel Amasa Cobb, passed through Baltimore, Md., on the route to Washington. They left Madison, Wisconsin, where they had been in camp four weeks, on Wednesday last, coming by way of Janesville, Chicago, Toledo, Cleveland, and Pittsburg. Their trip was a triumphal march. All along the journey they were met at every station by crowds of people, who not only cheered them by their presence, but also furnished them bountifully with refreshments of all kinds. Not a single accident happened on the whole
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
ol. Frank Wheaton. Brigade loss (7th Mass.): k, 1; w, 2== 3. Artillery, Maj. Robert M. West: C, 1st Pa., Capt. Jeremiah McCarthy; D, 1st Pa., Capt. Edward H. Flood: E, 1st Pa., Capt. Theodore Miller; H, 1st Pa., Capt. James Brady. Second division, Brig.-Gen. William F. Smith. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock (also in temporary command of Davidson's Third Brigade): 6th Me., Col. Hiram Burnham; 43d N. Y., Col. Francis L. Vinton; 49th Pa., Col. William H. Irwin; 5th Wis., Col. Amasa Cobb. Brigade loss: k, 8; w, 76; m, 1 == 85. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. H. Brooks: 2d Vt., Col. Henry Whiting; 3d Vt., Col. Breed N. Hyde; 4th Vt., Col. Edwin H. Stoughton; 5th Vt., Lieut.-Col. Lewis A. Grant; 6th Vt., Col. Nathan Lord. Brigade loss: w, 2. Third Brigade (temporarily under Hancock's command): 7th Me., Col. Edwin C. Mason; 33d N. Y., Col. Robert F. Taylor; 49th N. Y., Col. Daniel D. Bidwell; 76th N. Y., Col. James B. McKean. Brigade loss (33d N. Y.): w, 10. Artillery,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
nearly east, the right being on the railroad about five hundred yards west of Fair Oaks, the left in the woods on the north of theNine-mile road, and the other three brigades within close supporting distance. There were six brigades in Magruder's command. Two of them were guarding the Mechanicsville and Meadow Bridge roads. The positions of the other four brigades are given in a note, dated 11 P. M., May 31st, addressed to me by their immediate commander, General McLaws. He says: General Cobb, five regiments, [posted] from the Mechanicsville road to General Harvey's place; General Kershaw from General Harvey's to Baker's; Generals Griffith and Semmes from General Kershaw's right to New Bridge, and on the line down New Bridge road. Magruder's six brigades were the only forces guarding the crossings of the Chickahominy from New Bridge to Meadow Bridge. On the Federal side Keyes's corps, with abundant artillery, occupied that part of the Federal third line of defense which
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
95th Pa., Col. John M. Gosline (in w), Lieut.-Col. Gustavus W. Town. Brigade loss: k, 40; w, 279; in, 114==433. Artillery, Capt. Edward R. Platt: 1st Mass., Capt. Josiah Porter; 1st N. J., Capt. William Hexamer; D, 2d U. S., Lieut. Emory Upton. Artillery loss: k, 1; w, 13; m, 4==18. Second division, Brig.-Gen. William F. Smith. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock: 6th. Me., Col. Hiram Burnham; 43d N. Y., Col. Francis L. Vinton; 49th Pa., Col. William H. Irwin; 5th Wis., Col. Amasa Cobb. Brigade loss: k, 9; w, 93; m, 98 == 200. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. H. Brooks (w): 2d Vt., Col. Henry Whiting; 3d Vt., Lieut.-Col. Wheelock G. Veazey; 4th Vt., Col. Edwin H. Stoughton; 5th Vt., Lieut.-Col. Lewis A. Grant; 6th Vt., Col. Nathan Lord, Jr. Brigade loss: k, 45; w, 271; m, 139 == 455. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John W. Davidson; 7th Me., Col. Edwin C. Mason; 20th. N. Y., Col. Francis Weiss; 33d N. Y., Col. Robert F. Taylor; 49th N. Y., Col. Daniel D. Bidwell; 77th N. Y
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
h, as also that of the 27th,--see p. 367,--is known as Golding's and Garnett's Farms.] Also on the 28th a detachment of Cobb's Georgia Legion (cavalry) had a skirmish at Dispatch Station with the pickets of the 8th Illinois Cavalry.--Editors. Thatrd's, Pettit's, and Osborn's batterries were engaged on the Union side. The Confederate infantry north of the railroad (Cobb's, Toombs's, and Anderson's brigades) did not take an active part in the battle. Anderson's brigade is not shown, its posnsisted of Semmes's and Kershaw's brigades, Kemper's battery, and two regiments of Barksdale's brigade opposite our left. Cobb's division and two guns of Hart's battery were north of the railroad to the right of our line. Cobb's infantry was not enCobb's infantry was not engaged. About a half-hour after the fight was ended, I suggested to General Sumner that if he had no objection I would carry out the commanding general's orders, so far as I was concerned, and cross the White Oak Swamp with General Smith's division
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