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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 10: Favorites of a day (search)
the forgotten novel called The Lamplighter had a wider English circulation than any American book had hitherto conquered except Uncle Tom's Cabin? or why The Wide, Wide World achieved such a success as still to retain its hold on English farmhouses? They were no better than the works of a native author named Roe, and probably not so good. In this country the authors who have achieved the most astounding popular successes are, as a rule, now absolutely forgotten. I can remember when Sylvanus Cobb, Jr., received by far the largest salary then paid to any American writer, and Dr. J. H. Robinson spent his life in trying to rival him. The vast evangelical constituency which now reads Ben-Hur then read Ingraham's Prince of the House of David; the boys who now pore over Oliver Optic had then Mayne Reid. Those who enjoy Gunter and Albert Ross then perused, it is to be presumed, the writings of Mr. J. W. Buel, whose very name will be, to most readers of today, unknown. His Beautiful Story
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 10: forecast (search)
ice had yet appeared in Europe. If there was such a thing as literary foresight during the past century, its fountain was to be found in the New World, not the Old. In speaking of the soundness of the judgment of the American public, one cannot, of The Popular course, include the vast number of Verdict. people who read some sort of books. In this country the authors who have achieved the most astounding popular successes, are, as a rule, absolutely forgotten. I can remember when Sylvanus Cobb, Jr., received by far the largest salary yet paid to any American writer, and Dr. J. H. Robinson spent his life in trying to rival him. The vast evangelical constituency which now reads Ben Hur then read Ingraham's Prince of the house of David; the boys who now pore over Henty would then have had Mayne Reid. Those who enjoy Gunter would have then read, it is to be presumed, the writings of Mr. J. W. Buel, whose very name will be, to most readers of to-day, unknown. His Beautiful story re
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
an's, 232. Charlotte Temple, Mrs. Rowson's, 92, 241. Chasles, M. Philarete, 244. Chastellux, Marquis de, 54. Chatham, Lord, 44, 45. Child, Lydia Maria, 125, 126. Choate, Rufus, 112. Christabel, Coleridge's, 219. Christianus per Ignem, Mather's, 17. Christus: a Miystery, Longfellow's, 144. Clara Howard, Brown's, 70. Clarissa Harlowe, Richardson's, 251. Clemens, Samuel M. See Mark Twain. Cliff-dwellers, Fuller's, 255. Closed gate, Mrs. Moulton's, 264. Cobb, Sylvanus, Jr., 262. Coleridge, Ernest Hartley, 43. Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, 35, 46, 66, 68, 69, 211, 219, 258. Coleridge, Sara, 142. Collins, Wilkie, 208. Columbus, Irving's Life of, 87, 119. Commemoration Ode, Lowell's, 225, 264. Common sense, Paine's, 55. Concord, Battle of, 41. Congress, Continental, 49. Congress, General, 45, 79. Conspiracy of Pontiac, extract from Parkman's, 121. Constitution, Federal, 51, 52. Contemplations, Anne Bradstreet's, 12. Conversati
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
ark, William, 518 Clarke, C. F., 211 Clarke, James F., 451, 496 Clarke, W. N., 205, 212 Clarkson, Thomas, 344 Clay, Henry, 337 Clemens, Orion, 2, 3, 14 Clemens, Samuel Langhorne, 1-20, 24, 27, 36, 68, 77, 86, 91, 154, 155, 267, 271, 570, 615 Cleopatra, 38 Cleveland, Grover, 48, 354 Cliff-dwellers, the, 92 Climate of Hawaii, the, 156 Clinton, DeWitt, 397, 398, 411, 415 Clouds, the, 460, 463 Coan, Titus, 155 Coan, Titus, Munson, 156 Cobb, Irvin S., 498 Cobb, Sylvanus, 66 Cody, William F., 66, 133 Cogswell, J. G., 451, 452, 456 Cohan, George M., 289-290, 498 Cohn, Gustav, 443 Coin's financial Fool, 358 Coin's financial school, 357 Colden, Cadwallader, 179 Coleridge, 54, 228, 234, 475 Colgate College, 205 Colleen Bawn, the, 268 College Fetich, A, 459 n. College of Mirania, 394 College widow, the, 289 Collier, J. P., 481, 482 Collier's weekly, 293, 333 Collins, J. A., 437 Colman, John, 426 Colonel Carter of Carters
hich has become famous. She told me, also. that Mr. Tufts was one day at work in a large field, when, becoming weary, he lay down under a tree and fell asleep. He dreamed of the great institution now planted on College Hill. This was a prophetic dream, and the fulfillment of it was not realized at the time when related by Mrs. Tufts. The founding of the college was no mere accident, for as early as 1840 Mr. Tufts had made plans for such an institution. In 1847 Samuel Frothingham, Sylvanus Cobb, and Mr. Tufts, with others, were incorporated for the purpose of establishing the Tufts institution for learning. This was several years before Tufts College was thought of. Historical address John F. Ayer In the Somerville of to-day there is little to remind one of the town of fifty years ago. Being in 1854 but twelve years of age, it still retained, to a great extent, its baby looks. Many of its inhabitants were then engaged in agricultural or kindred pursuits, although ther
st and Literary Companion, which was, in 1846, merged in the Western Evangelist, published in Buffalo, N. Y. As the agent of the Massachusetts Universalist Home Missionary Society, he preached in various parts of that state, organizing, and being for several years pastor of the church in Somerville, where for nine years he was also superintendent of the public schools. From 1858 to 1864 he edited the Universalist Quarterly. From November, 1862, to May, 1864, he was associated with Sylvanus Cobb, D. D., in editing the Trumpet and Christian Freeman. The name of the paper was changed to the Universalist in 1864, and Dr. Emerson was sole editor until 1867, when he moved to New York, where he edited the Christian Leader until 1872. At the same time he was pastor at Huntington. Returning to Boston in April, 1872, he resumed his connection with the Universalist, and was its editor, under its various names of the Universalist, the Christian Leader, and the Universalist Leader, until
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XXIV (search)
been sold, and another called Delaplaine, that had gone up to forty-five thousand. Another author of the same school, known as Ned Buntline, is said to have earned sixty thousand dollars in a single year by his efforts; and still another, Sylvanus Cobb, Jr., is known to have habitually received a salary of ten thousand dollars for publications equally popular. No community can do without such books, but in America they are not usually counted as literature. Their authors scarcely obtain evenots are gravely discussed, compared, and criticised; he is himself admitted into the Contemporary Review as a valued contributor; Mr. Lang writes books with him; his success lies not merely in his publisher's balance, like that of Mr. Walworth, Mr. Cobb, or Ned Buntline, but it is a succes d'estime. When, on the other hand, one opens an American daily paper to see what is said about the latest Haggard publication, one is likely to happen upon something like this: We grudge it the few necessa
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
a, Jacques, 41. Catullus, 99. Cervantes, Miguel de, 229. Champlain, Samuel de, 192. Channing, E. T., 94 Channing, Walter, 214. Channing, W. E., 46, 66, 155. Channing, W. E. (of Concord), 103. Chaucer, Geoffrey, 179. Cherbuliez, Victor, 79. Chapelain, J., 91. Chaplin, H. W., 76. Chicago Anarchists, the, 68. Choate, Rufus, 213. Cicero, M. T., 4, 13,16, 171. City life, limitations of, 80. Claverhouse, Earl of, 47. Clemens, S. H., 29, 57. Cleveland, Grover, 110. Cobb, Sylvanus, 199, 200. Coleridge, S. T., 197, 215, 217. College education, value of, 113. Comte, Auguste, 32. Contemporaneous posterity, a, 51. Conway, M. D., 31. Cooper, J. F., 58, 62, 155. Corneille, Pierre, 92. Cosmopolitan standard, a, 43. Coster, John, 6. Court of England not sought by literary men, 74. Cousin, Victor, 216. Creighton, Dr., 34. Cruger, Mrs. Julie (Julien Gordon), 11. Crusoe, Robinson, 17. D. Dante, Alighieri, 48,114, 185, 186, 187, 189, 196. Da
d. The Universalist Society of Waltham was gathered in the Bank Hall, and the first preaching held in the fall of 1836. The desk was supplied by the Rev. Thomas Whittemore and others till the following summer, when the society engaged the Rev. William C. Hanscom, from New Market, N. H., as their pastor, who entered upon his duties August 29, 1837. His health gave way and he preached his last sermon on the first Sabbath in January 1838. He died May 23d following, at the age of 23. Rev. Sylvanus Cobb, of Malden, succeeded him in April, 1838, and in July a church was formed, numbering 33 members, which was publicly and duly recognized September 13th of the same year. In 1839 about twenty families of the old First Parish residing in the northeast part of the town proposed and effected a union with the Universalist Society and assisted them in building a church on the corner of Lyman and Summer Streets, near the site of the old church, upon land given by Hon. Theodore Lyman, who a
Edward Everett. This polished craven, who has served both God and Mammon; who has been preacher, politician, sycophant, conservative, fanatic, by turns, and any and everything where thrift might follow after, is still writing for Bonner's Ledger. His latest essay under the patronage of Sylvanus Cobb, is on "Intervention." He declaims most bitterly against anything of the kind. He thinks it impossible that England can do anything so monstrous. Of course he does. And he cunningly argues that the Southern statesmen have always been the enemies of England. Also, of course. Fearing England, he would now frown on her ! He declares that, "to go to war with the United States to obtain a supply of cotton, would be a violation of the law of nations." He urges on England not to think of any such thing! Of course England will respect the reasons and the remonstrances of the accomplished sycophant, who is defending a war of rapine against sovereign States, and maintaining outrages of h
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