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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 6 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for T. R. R. Cobb or search for T. R. R. Cobb in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
must be sent. General Longstreet took the letter to his own quarters, where he found General T. R. R. Cobb, of this State. He gave it to General Cobb, pledging him to observe secrecy with regardGeneral Cobb, pledging him to observe secrecy with regard to it, but not saying a word as to the construction he placed on it. After reading the letter attentively General Cobb said there was no doubt in his mind that General McClellan wanted General LeeGeneral Cobb said there was no doubt in his mind that General McClellan wanted General Lee to help in the restoration of the Union by marching to Washington with the combined forces. General Longstreet told me of the circumstances more than once, and always added that he thoroughly coincided in General Cobb's views, but that General Lee, for the reason stated, declined to meet General McClellan. The copy which General Lee gave General Longstreet was sent, after the war, to Colonel ading Northern States gave large Democratic majorities. It was, therefore, not difficult for General Cobb and General Longstreet in 1862 to believe that in proposing an interview after the battle of