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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 154 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 137 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 105 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Thomas R. R. Cobb or search for Thomas R. R. Cobb in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Barksdale's Mississippi Brigade at Fredericksburg. (search)
ws' Division, composed of Kershaw's South Carolina, Semmes' Georgia, Cobb's Georgia and Barksdale's Mississippi Brigades, was under Jackson at Heights, where we remained until the morning of the 13th. General Thos. R. R. Cobb, with his brigade of Georgians, took position in the sunk McLaw's division was posted from the foot of Marye's Hill, where Cobb occupied the cut, extending towards the south, with Kershaw on his rWashington Artillery was posted on Marye's Hill, just in the rear of Cobb, and behind Kershaw and Barksdale were two batteries of the Richmondmoved forward, and halted about one hundred yards from the cut where Cobb was concealed. The line was dressed, and every man stood in his plabehaved with greater credit. During that dreadful engagement, General Cobb was seriously wounded, and died soon afterwards. General Cobb wGeneral Cobb was a distinguished man in peace, and could have won even greater fame in war had he lived. Soon after he was wounded, General McLaws observ
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
. Stephens and me. Mr. Toombs was in the seat behind. Mr. Stephens, said Chestnut, the delegation from my State has' been conferring and has decided to look to Georgia for a President. Well, sir, Mr. Stephens replied, we have Mr. Toombs, Mr. Cobb, Governor Jenkins and Governor Johnson. Either will suit; I will give my vote to either. We are only looking to you and Mr. Toombs, Mr. Stephens, Chestnut answered positively. No other names were mentioned, and the majority of the delegatill night caucusing; that Toombs was the second choice with the members of Congress, but the delegates from the undecided States did not consider him radical enough. They said he would make Mr. Stephens his premier, and be guided by his advice. Cobb and Rhett's names were both considered, but the radicals would not accept either. After further skirmishing Jeff Davis' name was presented, and the radicals made no objections. For the sake of harmony, the other delegates fell into line, and t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
nd hole of the minie-ball. The slaughter below the Heights. As the party stood upon the hill top, the story of the awful slaughter at the foot of Marye's Heights was retold. In the road below was the monument which marked the spot where General Cobb was killed, with the house still standing over which came the shell that struck him. Longstreet's dtscription was recalled. A fifth time the Federals formed and charged and were repulsed, he says. A sixth time they charged and were driven back, when night came to end the dreadful carnage and the Federal withdrew, leaving the battle-field literally heaped with the bodies of their dead. Before the well-directed fire of Cobb's Brigade, the Federals had fallen like the steady dripping of rain from the eaves of a house. Our musketry alone killed and wounded at least 5,000, and these, with the slaughter by the artillery, left over 7,000 killed and wounded before the foot of Marye's Hill. The dead were piled sometimes three deep, and w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
or Reconstruction, 256 Arbitrary Imprisonment of, 260 Capitol, Location of the Old, 29 Catlett's Station Raid, The, 213 Cavalry Raid in the War of Secession, 280 Chalmers, Gen. A. H,, 184 Chancellor-House Field and Ford, 199 Chiltou, Gen. R. H., 10 Chimborazo Hospital History of, 86 Organization of, 91 Its Trading Boat 90 Christian, Judge, Geo. L., 160 Churchville Cavalry, Roster of 218 Clark Hon. Champ, Pithy Address of, 74 Clay, Henry on Secession, 67 Cobb, Gen. T. R. R., Killed 24 Cohesive Power of Public Plunder. 324 Coles Hon, Edward, Began Reform with His Own Slaves, 32 Co E, 19th Va. Infantry, Officers and Roster, 237 Confederate Army, Its Grand Achievements Privations and Fortitude 72 Confederate Constitution, Adoption of the, 244 Original Manuscript of, 371 Confederate Generals from Va. 105 Confederate Memorial Literary Society, Manuscripts of, 372 Confederate Money Depreciation of, 31 Confederate Presidency Offered A.