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Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Robert E. Park, Macon, Georgia, late Captain Twelfth Alabama regiment, Confederate States army. (search)
Sixty-first Alabama regiments, of which the brigade was composed, were sent in different directions to guard roads. The Twelfth Alabama remained on picket all night, leaving outpost for the brigade at three o'clock P. M. July 8th Rhodes' division was taken within a short distance of the Ferry, halted for an hour or two, and then marched across the mountain at Crampton's Gap, where General Howell Cobb's brigade of Georgians fought in 1862, and where Lieutenant-Colonel Jeff. Lamar, of Tom Cobb's Legion, was killed. Here Tom Irvine, of Oxford, Georgia, one of my earliest schoolfellows, and a very intelligent and promising youth, was also slain. We passed through Burkettsville and stopped near Jefferson. The sun was very hot indeed to-day, and marching very uncomfortable. The mountain scenery in this section is very beautiful. July 9th Marched through and beyond Frederick City, but neither saw nor heard anything of the mythical Barbara Freitchie, concerning whom the aboli
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 9: Malvern Hill and the effect of the Seven Days battles (search)
hen, and is now, that the Federal skirmishers often refrained from firing upon him simply because they did not care at the time to expose their position. Many of our soldiers knew him, especially the Georgians, Virginians and Mississippians. Georgia was his native State. In his early days he had done a great deal of evangelistic work in all parts of it, and many young men and boys in the army had heard their parents speak of him. I remember one evening, after a most impressive sermon to Cobb's or Cummings' brigade, overhearing a lot of soldiers talking at a spring, when one of them, anxious to appear a little more familiarly acquainted with the preacher than the rest, said, I've heard my mother talk of the old Doctor many a time. I reckon the old fellow's given me many a dose of physic for croup. An incident occurred, on or near the Nine-Mile road, some time before the week of battle opened which is strongly illustrative at once of my father's faith and of the childlike simp
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 11: religious life of Lee's Army (search)
at Gettysburg. No account of my experience as a Confederate soldier would be complete if it failed to refer to the religious life of the army. This was an element of importance in all our armies, from the outset to the end, and was recognized and fostered as such by our leading generals, many of whom attended the religious services held among the men of their commands, some of them taking loving direction of these services. I remember on one occasion, when my father was preaching to Tom Cobb's brigade, on the lines about Richmond in 1862, that the service was interrupted by sharp firing in front and the command marched off into the woods. It proved a false alarm, however; the troops soon returned and the service was resumed. But the men were preoccupied, nervous, and widely scattered, and everything dragged, until the general, rising, begged my father to wait a moment, and called out: Men, get up close together here in front, till your shoulders meet. You can't make a fire i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
miles from Crampton's Gap, and the 3rd, 5th, 6th, 12th and 61st Ala., of which the brigade was composed were sent in different directions to guard roads. The 12th Alabama was on picket all night, leaving outpost for the brigade at 3 o'clock P. M. Rodes' division was taken within a short distance of the Ferry, halted for an hour or two, and then marched across the mountain at Crampton's Gap, where Gen. Howell Cobb's brigade of Georgians fought in 1862, and where Lieut-Col. Jeff Lamar, of Tom Cobb's Legion, was killed. On July 9th we marched through and beyond Frederick City, but neither saw nor heard anything of the mythical Barbara Freitchie, concerning whom the gentle Quaker poet, Whittier, erred sadly as to facts in his poem. We found the enemy, under Gen. Lew. Wallace, posted on the Heights, near Monocacy river. Our sharpshooters engaged them, and private Smith of Co. D. was killed. Gen. Gordon attacked the enemy with his division, and routed them completely, killing a la
ur Georgia exchanges, has been appointed a Colonel in the Provisional Army, and is raising a regiment in the sixth Congressional District of that State for the war. The Vice President of the Confederate States, Hon. Alex. H. Stevens, possesses too weak a frame to enter into military service; but he is devoting his appended intellectual powers in another and equally important service. T. R. R. Cobb, of Georgia, brother of the President of Congress, is raising a legion to be called "Tom Cobb's Legion." Louis, T. Wigfall, of Texas, has been for several weeks in our city, devoting his time and faculties in a most useful way, and we doubt if he can much longer be kept from a closer observation of the enemy, and a participation in the actual conflict. General Waul, of Texas, is likewise in Richmond, forwarding the interests of the people of his State, who are desirous of being allowed a full participation in the war. Hon. Henry Marshall, delegate from Louisiana, has
The Daily Dispatch: July 18, 1861., [Electronic resource], What Georgia has done and is doing. (search)
pendent — is now organized under Col. Ector who fought in the Mexican war, and the 11th and 12th regiments will organize in Atlanta next week, under command, doubtless, of Hon. W. E. Stiles and Hon, Thomas W. Thomas. To these must soon be added Tom Cobb's Legion. Col. Cobb's independent regiment, Col. Hammond's, Col. McMillain's and Col. Underwood's, which will increase Georgia's fighting force, including the Regulars and Phillips' Brigade, to near twenty-five thousand effective troops, And th11th and 12th regiments will organize in Atlanta next week, under command, doubtless, of Hon. W. E. Stiles and Hon, Thomas W. Thomas. To these must soon be added Tom Cobb's Legion. Col. Cobb's independent regiment, Col. Hammond's, Col. McMillain's and Col. Underwood's, which will increase Georgia's fighting force, including the Regulars and Phillips' Brigade, to near twenty-five thousand effective troops, And this is only one-half or one-third or what Georgia can and will do, if necessary.