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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 148 18 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 75 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 62 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 40 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 39 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 27 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 25 3 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 25 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Howell Cobb or search for Howell Cobb in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
jutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., and of which Major General Lewis Wallace, United States Volunteers, is President, was arraigned and tried Henry Wirz. Finding—The Commission, after having maturely considered the evidence adduced, find the accused guilty, as follows: Of specification to Charge 1, guilty, after amending said specification as follows: In this, that the said Henry Wirz did combine, confederate and conspire with them, the said Jefferson Davis, James A. Seddon, Howell Cobb, John H. Winder, Richard B. Winder, Isaiah H. White, S. Reed, R. R. Stephenson, S. P. Moore,——Keer (late hospital steward at Andersonville), James Duncan, Wesley W. Turner, Benjamin Harris, and others whose names are unknown, maliciously and traitorously and in violation of the laws of war, to impair and injure the health and to destroy the lives of a large number of Federal prisoners, to-wit, 45,000 soldiers, etc. The court implicated with Wirz, President Davis and members of his Cabi<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
ome people into the incubating Confederacy. At the birth of the new nation, he was popularly accepted as its chief. There were—as was inevitable in an infant coalition of the disjecta membra of an old one—cliques cabals and office greed. At Montgomery, other candidates were spoken of. Alexander H. Stephens was often mentioned; Toombs was talked of, and what was known as the South Carolina clique —in which were Louis T. Wigfall, Lawrence M. Keitt, William W. Boyce and others—advocated Howell Cobb, late of the Buchanan Cabinet. But Mr. Davis was unanimously chosen Provisional President and was inaugurated with wild acclaim, at the Capitol, on Feb. 18. 1861. When the permanent Government went into power, he was re-elected without opposition, and was inaugurated at the Washington statue, in the Richmond Capitol grounds, on Feb. 22, 1862. At this time, Mr. Davis was the idol of the people and almost equally of the army. This is no time and place—even did limits permit—to d