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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 154 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 137 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 105 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Thomas R. R. Cobb or search for Thomas R. R. Cobb in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1862., [Electronic resource], Important from Fredericksburg — the enemy Recrosses the Rappahannock. (search)
ington Artillery, (whose ammunition had been exhausted,) and ended the contest for the day. The enemy was supported in his attacks by the fire of strong batteries of artillery on the right bank of the river, as well as by his numerous heavy batteries on the Stafford heights. Our loss during the operations, since the movements of the enemy began, amounts to about 1,800 killed and wounded. Among the former I regret to report the death of the patriotic soldier and states man, Brig' Gen. Thomas R. R. Cobb, who fell upon our left; and among the latter, that brave soldier and accomplished gentleman, Brig-General Maxcy Gregg, who was very seriously, and, it is feared, mortally wounded, during the attack on our right. The enemy to-day has been apparently engaged in earing for his wounded and burying his dead. His troops are visible in their first position in line of battle, but, with the exception of some desultory cannonading and firing between skirmishers, he has not attempted to
Particulars of Gen. Morgan's last exploit --Capture of Two Thousand One Hundred Prisoners.--The successful attack by Gen. Morgan, upon Hartsville, Tenn., was one of the most extraordinary feats of the war. The forces engaged in the affair on our side were the 9th and 2d Kentucky infantry, commanded by Col. Thos. H. Hunt, numbering 680 men, and the cavalry regiments of Chensult, Duke, dennett, and Huffman, with Cobb's Kentucky battery. All told, our force was about 1,3 The enemy was the 39th brigade of Dumont's division, composed of three regiments, one battalion, a squadron of cavalry, and a section of artillery. It was commanded by Col. Abraham B Moore, of Peru, Lasalle co., Illinois. The Rebel Banner says: The attack was made just after sunrise; but in stead of surprising the Yankees, they were found strongly posted on the top of a sleep hill, and in perfect time of battle. Our line was formed under the fire of the enemy, but it was done with great precision and perfe