hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 5 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Thomas Reed Rootes Cobb or search for Thomas Reed Rootes Cobb in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 5 document sections:

Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
, asking if he would sanction the movement of Georgia volunteers going to the aid of South Carolina; but this generous impulse was very properly checked, pending the action of the State convention. By act of the legislature, a sovereign convention had been summoned to meet at Milledgeville on January 6, 1861, to decide upon the action to be taken by the State of Georgia. Among the delegates were some of the ablest men that Georgia has produced. Immediate secession was advocated by Thomas R. R. Cobb, Francis S. Bartow and Robert Toombs, while Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin H. Hill and Herschel V. Johnson used all their influence for delay until there could be a congress of the Southern States to take united action. But all parties pledged Georgia to resist any effort at coercion of a sovereign State. On the 9th of January, 1861, the ordinance of secession was adopted, and the president of the convention, ex-Gov. George W. Crawford, briefly and impressively announced that the S
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
s promoted to lieutenant-colonel and afterward was commissioned colonel. Other organizations of this early period were the Georgia legion, commanded by Col. Thomas R. R. Cobb, with P. M. B. Young as lieutenant-colonel and Ben C. Yancey, major. It was composed of seven companies of infantry, four of cavalry and one of artilleryomas Hutchison; Twenty-fourth volunteers, Col. Robert McMillan; Twenty-fifth volunteers, Col. C. C. Wilson; Georgia legion, infantry, cavalry and artillery, Col. T. R. R. Cobb; Phillips legion, infantry, cavalry and artillery, Col. William Phillips; First battalion infantry, Lieut.-Col. J. B. Villepigue; Second battalion infantry,I, and J. R. Cooper of Company K. The Georgia legion, composed of infantry, cavalry and artillery, was organized before the battle of First Manassas, with Thomas R. R. Cobb as colonel, P. M. B. Young, lieutenant-colonel, Ben C. Yancey, major, J. C. Rutherford, adjutant. The infantry captains were W. D. Conyers (A), C. A. McDani
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
my attention frequently during the action—now serving No. 1, and now as gunner, and still directing and disposing the whole with perfect self-command and a devotion to his duty that was, I believe, scarcely ever equaled. This battery and Hamilton's and Lane's were assigned to the reserve artillery under Colonel Pendleton. In General Magruder's district, the peninsula, the Sixth, Tenth and Sixteenth, under Alfred H. Colquitt, Lafayette McLaws and Howell Cobb, and Cobb's legion under T. R. R. Cobb, well sustained the reputation of the State. McLaws was promoted brigadier-general and assigned to important command, and Colonel Colquitt was given charge of a brigade including the Sixth and Sixteenth. Late in the year the Twenty-third regiment, unarmed, was sent forward to Yorktown. An unfortunate incident in the history of Cobb's legion is preserved in the official reports of General Magruder. It appears that a scouting party had been fired upon, and he had sent forward an ambusc
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
g the slain. But the most famous incident of this battle, as often quoted among the glorious defenses of military history as is the charge at Cemetery hill among the assaults, was the performance of Cobb's brigade at Marye's hill. His heroic command was now composed of the Sixteenth regiment, Col. Goode Bryan; Eighteenth, Col. W. T. Wofford; Twenty-fourth, Col. Robert McMillan; Cobb's legion, Lieut.-Col. L. J. Glenn, and Phillips' legion, Col. W. Phillips, under the command of Brig.-Gen. Thomas R. R. Cobb, who had succeeded Gen. Howell Cobb. On the night of December 11th, the brigade had taken its position in the Telegraph road, a sunken highway at the base of Marye's hill, on the side of which, next the town, was a stone wall, shoulder high, against which the earth was banked, making an almost impregnable defense. When on the morning of the 13th the Federals in great masses of troops advanced from the town of Fredericksburg, they could not see the fatal sunken road, nor know tha
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
r in the Union should be the hour of her independence out of the Union. He and his brother, T. R. R. Cobb, aided largely in bringing about the secession of Georgia. The Congress of the seceded Souttings and in the assembly he was pre-eminent, both as orator and statesman. Brigadier-General Thomas Reed Rootes Cobb Brigadier-General Thomas Reed Rootes Cobb was born at Cherry Hill, JeffersoBrigadier-General Thomas Reed Rootes Cobb was born at Cherry Hill, Jefferson county, Ga., on the 10th of April, 1823. His grandfather, Howell Cobb, of Virginia, was a distinguished congressman from 1807 to 181 2. His father was John A. Cobb, of North Carolina, who marriedacing his own and Law's brigades. At Fredericksburg the Eighteenth Georgia formed a part of T. R. R. Cobb's brigade. After the death of that noble officer, Colonel Wofford was promoted to brigadierde-camp to Gen. W. H. T. Walker, was appointed adjutant of the Georgia legion commanded by Thomas R. R. Cobb in July, promoted to major of the same command in September, and to lieutenantcolo-nel in