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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for James Cochran or search for James Cochran in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
rprised just at daybreak, and the entire post taken, though it was a fortified place. Part of the winter of 1862-‘63 was spent at Salem, Va., where the company was put into the 14th Virginia cavalry, and became company B of that regiment. James Cochran was colonel, John A. Gibson lieutenant-colonel, and B. F. Eakle major. This company and the Churchville cavalry constituted the charging squadron of the regiment, and Jenkins's brigade, with myself first, and Captain James A. Wilson, of the and its services were highly commended by all when I returned. In March, 1865, I came back to our regiment, then transferred to Beale's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It was near Five Forks. I was put in command of our regiment by Colonel Cochran (the only field officer present), who was too unwell to command. From Five Forks to Appomattox we were hard pressed, with little food and rest. All the way we were attacked on every side. Our ranks were thinned out by sickness, fatigue, h