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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 13 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. You can also browse the collection for Coehorn or search for Coehorn in all documents.

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ected to forward a detachment of artillerists to relieve those of the 63d Georgia Volunteers who had become reduced by casualties and sickness, and had been ordered to return to Savannah. The Ordnance Department in Richmond was applied to for Coehorn mortars. The fire of the enemy on the 3d was not heavy, but his sharp-shooters annoyed the garrison of Wagner considerably. No casualties occurred during the day. Brigadier-General Mercer, at Savannah, was informed that transports were rpickets in the Marsh Battery, near Vincent's Creek. On the 5th the guns in Battery Wagner were all in fighting order. Our sharp-shooters, armed with Whitworth rifles, seemed to annoy the enemy greatly, who endeavored to silence their fire with Coehorn mortars. About nine o'clock on that night a picket of the enemy which had taken possession of our unfinished battery in Vincent's Creek, and, by signalling the arrival at night of our steamers at Cummings's Point, interfered materially with o
cts ample preparations for the event of the explosion of the mine were carefully made by General Beauregard. Batteries of 12-pounder Napoleons, 8 and 10 inch and Coehorn mortars, were erected on well-selected elevations in rear of and commanding the exposed points, assuring both a cross and front fire. Gorge-lines were also constping the ground in front of the crater. Major Haskell's battery of four 8 and 10 inch mortars, under Captain Lamkin, in rear on the Jerusalem plank road, and one Coehorn and two 12-pounder mortars of Lamkin's, in the ravine, about 200 yards to the left and rear of the crater, and two 8-inch mortars, were served with unremitting anastonished and demoralized them. Major Haskell's mortar-battery, in charge of Captain Lamkin, consisting of four Coehorns, on the Jerusalem plank road, and one Coehorn and two 12-pound mortars in the ravine, some two hundred yards to the left and rear of the breach, and two mortars to the left of Wright's battery, were all opene
ister into the enemy's left flank, and, with Wright's battery, to sweep the ground in front of the breach with a destructive cross-fire. It opened with a few rounds, but was soon deserted by officers and men (for which the officer was duly sentenced). The gun was afterwards manned and officered from Wise's brigade, and did excellent service under Colonel Goode. Major Haskell's mortar-battery, in charge of Captain Lamkin, consisting of four Coehorns, on the Jerusalem plank road, and one Coehorn and two 12-pound mortars, in the ravine some two hundred yards to the left and rear of the breach, and two mortars, to the left of Wright's battery, were all opened promptly on the assaulting columns. The practice of the four mortars on the plank road was admirable. Their shells dropped with precision upon the enemy's masses, huddled in disorder in front and in the crater. Some three mortars, on the right of Baxter road, commanded by Lieutenant Langhorn, opened and continued at interva