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Ferry, Goose Creek, and other Passages on Monday morning details of the battle of Leesburgh General Baker killed Colonel Coggswell, with eight hundred men taken prisoners great slaughter victory of the Confederate forces retreat of the enemy t strewn with the dead and wounded in hundreds. General Baker having been killed shortly after our fierce onset, Colonel Coggswell now commanded the enemy, and thought to make good his retreat by a flank movement to Edwards's Ferry. While he delaged with great fury, and it seemed to us there was no end to the stream of fresh troops relieving the enemy. But Colonel Coggswell had succeeded to the command in a luckless hour. Endeavoring to move by the left flank, in order to effect a junctchief in command, marched to the rear. The fighting still continued in the centre, as if the troops were unaware of Coggswell's surrender, but as it was not our object to shed blood unnecessarily, we all ceased firing for a few moments. Our com
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 12: (search)
right, E. B. Wight, George A. Townsend, J. Russell Young, subsequently librarian of the Congressional Library, W. Scott Smith, Eli Perkins, Charles Lanman, Don Piatt, Ben Perley Poore, E. V. Smalley, Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, and a host of correspondents who have made enviable reputations in their calling. Among the women reporters who wielded influential pens as correspondents of important newspapers were Mary Clemmer Ames, Mrs. Lippincott, Mrs. H. M. Barnum, Mrs. Olivia Briggs, Mrs. Coggswell, Mrs. and Miss Snead, and Miss Mary E. Healey. General Grant soon nominated his cabinet, retaining those who had served during his first term, with the exception of the Secretary of the Treasury. The members of the cabinet were: Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State; William A. Richardson, Secretary of the Treasury; W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War; George M. Robeson, Secretary of the Navy; Columbus Delano, Secretary of the Interior; John A. Creswell, Postmaster-General; George H. Willia
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
olunteers. 102d New York Volunt'rs. 137th New York Volunt'rs. 149th New York Volunt'rs. Third division. Brevet Major-General W. T. Ward. First Brigade. Colonel H. Case. 70th Indiana Volunteers. 79th Ohio Volunteers. 102d Illinois Volunteers. 105th Illinois Volunteers. 129th Illinois Volunteers. Second Brigade. Colonel Daniel Dustin. 19th Michigan Volunteers. 22d Wisconsin Volunteers. 33d Indiana Volunteers. 85th Indiana Volunteers. Third Brigade. Brevet Brig.-General Coggswell 20th Connecticut Volun. 26th Wisconsin Volunt'rs 33d Massachusetts Volun. 55th Ohio Volunteers. 73d Ohio Volunteers. 136th New York Volunt'rs detachments. Artillery Brigade. Captain Winnegar. Battery I, 1st New York. Battery M, 1st New York. Battery C, 1st Ohio. Battery E, Independent Pennsylvania. Pontoniers, 58th Indiana Veteran Volunteers. Mechanics and Engineers, 1st Michigan. Army of the Ohio. Major-General John M. Schofield commanding.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 2.-fight at Port Royal, S. C. January 1, 1862. (search)
ts were, consequently, very often aground; but so admirably are they adapted to this kind of service that we never felt any solicitude for their safety. Lieutenant Coggswell, a signal officer of the army, was directed to report to me for duty, and furnished me with the means of constantly communicating with General Stevens with by passing shells directly over the heads of our troops. The duty of signalizing from the land to the ships was in charge of First Lieutenant Taft and Second Lieut. Coggswell, of Gen. Stevens's staff and was done in a manner which brings credit to both these gentlemen. Lieut. Taft being detailed with the skirmishing party, and Coggswell on the ships, one other officer occupying a position near the reserve, kept up a complete communication. The big twelve-pounder cannon, captured from the enemy, now stands in front of Gen. Stevens's headquarters. brier Wood. Philadelphia press account. Port Royal, Jan. 5, 1869. A very skilfully planned an
alion of his brigade with him. Edward's Ferry, Oct. 21, 1851, 9.30 P. M. To Gen. McClellan: I am occupied in preventing further disaster, and try to get into a position to redeem. We have lost some of our best commanders — Baker dead, Coggswell a prisoner or secreted. The wounded are being carefully and rapidly removed, and Gorman's wing is being cautiously withdrawn. Any advance from Dranesville must be made cautiously. All was reported going well up to Baker's death, but in the cweight of his attack being on our centre and left. At about four our artillery was silenced, and Col. Devens was ordered to send two of his companies to support the left of our line; shortly after he learned that Col. Baker had been killed. Col. Coggswell then assumed command, and, after a vain attempt to cut his way through to Edward's Ferry, was obliged to give the order to retreat to the river-bank and direct the men to save themselves as best they could. I have gone thus much into detai
89 ; erroneous statement, 533 ; report of cabinet meeting, 544. Cheat Mountain, Va., 63. Chickahominy river, Va., 123, 241, 337, 340-343, 346-351, 354, 355, 358, 362-368, 376-379, 382, 385-390, 393-399, 402-401, 410-429, 443, 448, 468, 469, 505-508, 540, 551. Christian, Col., 581. Clark, Capt., 578, 605. Clarke, Gen. H. F., 83, 114, 130, 131. Cluseret, Gen., offers services, 143. Coast expedition, plans, 205, 206. Cockletown, Va., 260. Coggins's Point, Va., 491, 493. Coggswell, Col., 171, 185, 190. Colburn, Col. A. V., at Washington, 90, 123; Yorktown, 308, 311, 315 ; Pope's campaign, 537. Cold Harbor-see Gaines's Mill. Colston, Gen., 324. Comstock, Lieut. C. R., 124. Confederacy, proclaimed, 38; prepared 39. Congress, Federal, thanks McClellan, 82 ; resolution on war, 149. Conrad, Capt. F. A., 431. Constitution, power of amending, 32; violations, 33. Cooke, Gen., P. St. G.. 321, 417. Cooke, Capt., 577, 578, 605. Cooper, Capt., 430, 431. Corps
s endeavored to put out the conflagration, but much property was destroyed. In the afternoon the wind moderated and the fire was controlled. Ruins of the unfinished courthouse at Columbia The Congaree river bridge The empty prison The Presbyterian lecture-room Hunt's house Freight depot, South Carolina railroad The catholic convent: as Columbia looked after Sherman's army passed, in 1865 Home of state surgeon-general Gibbs The Lutheran church Evans and Coggswell's printing shop Deserted main street The Methodist episcopal church, Washington street The South Carolina railroad offices: what war brought to the capital of South Carolina it was decided that Sherman should march through the Carolinas, destroying the railroads in both States as he went. A little more than a month Sherman remained in Savannah. Then he began another great march, compared with which, as Sherman himself declared, the march to the sea was as child's play. The s
s endeavored to put out the conflagration, but much property was destroyed. In the afternoon the wind moderated and the fire was controlled. Ruins of the unfinished courthouse at Columbia The Congaree river bridge The empty prison The Presbyterian lecture-room Hunt's house Freight depot, South Carolina railroad The catholic convent: as Columbia looked after Sherman's army passed, in 1865 Home of state surgeon-general Gibbs The Lutheran church Evans and Coggswell's printing shop Deserted main street The Methodist episcopal church, Washington street The South Carolina railroad offices: what war brought to the capital of South Carolina it was decided that Sherman should march through the Carolinas, destroying the railroads in both States as he went. A little more than a month Sherman remained in Savannah. Then he began another great march, compared with which, as Sherman himself declared, the march to the sea was as child's play. The s
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
Died in defence of his country. As the hour waned, McClure looked at his watch. Beall noticed the movement, smiled, and inquired the hour. It was twelve o'clock. The execution, by the order, was to take place between twelve and two. His voyage was, therefore, drawing rapidly to a close. The sails could be seen in heaven coming up from the under-world. Destiny was making the last entry in the log-book of life. The harbor and the steeples of the city were in sight. Very soon Major Coggswell came in to bid his prisoner farewell. This officer himself had once been held in Richmond as a hostage, with the sword of Damocles above him, and he could, therefore, sympathize with a soldier under similarly trying circumstances. Like all around him, also, he had been drawn into the magnetic circle of Beall's friendship. After partaking of some nourishment, which Dr. Weston and Mr. McClure shared with him, Beall was left alone with his spiritual adviser. After him, the officers o
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
for furnishing rations for such volunteer companies as may be encamped within the limits of the city, to be expended under the direction of the Joint Special Committee appointed April 19th. On the 26th of April an order was passed directing the Joint Special Committee to expend from the appropriations already made five hundred dollars for uniforms for the members of the Light Artillery Company of Salem, and two hundred dollars for uniforms for the new volunteer company organized by Captain Coggswell. Seven hundred dollars were appropriated for building barracks on the camp ground on Winter Island. December 9th, Five thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers for the months of December and January ensuing; and the treasurer, under the direction of the Joint Standing Committee on Finance, was authorized to borrow the money. 1862. January 27th, Twenty thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families
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