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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
e Confederate veterans on furlough because of wounds or sickness. Of this last class were Colonel Flournoy and Colonel Eaton Coleman. Colonel Flournoy got together a small party of horsemen and pushed forward to reconnoitre the enemy and report his progress. Colonel Coleman assumed the command of the forces at the bridge and prepared its defences. He was a clever engineer and a veteran of several years' active service. He moved two hundred and fifty men across to the end of the bridty yards of the bridge, and every eye of the assailants was fixed upon the field-works and men beyond the river, when at Coleman's command the force under the bank arose, and as one man poured in their unexpected fire. The centre of the Federal line killed were the Rev. Mr. Burke, of the Episcopal Church, and Dr. Sutphin, a prominent physician of Halifax county. Colonel Coleman was severely wounded. A remarkable victory. Never in the history of modern war has such a force achieved suc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Another account of the fight. (search)
er gives another account of this remarkable battle: Randolph, Charlotte county, Va., Aug. 24, 1891. General D. H. Maury: My Dear General: * * * My brother, then under eighteen years of age was engaged in the battle. He assures me that there were in the fort not more than between four and five hundred men and boys—men over forty-five from the surrounding counties, and a few army men and officers on furlough; that of this number not more than two hundred and and fifty, under command of Coleman, were engaged in the fight in repelling the Federal assault upon the bridge; that only two Confederates were killed, viz.: The Rev. Mr. Burke, an Episcopal minister in the neighborhood, and Dr. Sutphin, a prominent physician of Halifax county—and only several severely wounded. I have not heard their dead estimated at less than sixty. Many, if not all of their dead, were buried where they fell upon the river flats. Subsequent freshets have exhumed and scattered their bones over the land.