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nment as far as possible. Times are very hard here. Merchants are doing but little. There have been some failures. But we hope for a better day. Frederick Coleman. Esq., the Senator from this District, is very ill, and fears are entertained as to his recovery. Dr. Coleman, of your city, and Prof. Coleman, of the Univo his recovery. Dr. Coleman, of your city, and Prof. Coleman, of the University, arrived here this evening to see him. The little folks are anticipating a joyful time, as Christmas is so near. The Commissioners from South Carolina to the Federal Government passed on to-day, in company with Mr. Cushing. Yours, &c., o his recovery. Dr. Coleman, of your city, and Prof. Coleman, of the University, arrived here this evening to see him. The little folks are anticipating a joyful time, as Christmas is so near. The Commissioners from South Carolina to the Federal Government passed on to-day, in company with Mr. Cushing. Yours, &c.,
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1860., [Electronic resource], A Mayor getting his election expenses out of gamblers and Houses of Ill Fame. (search)
The late Frederick Coleman. With sentiments of profound sorrow, we are called upon to announce the death of Frederick Coleman, of Fredericksburg, and the representative of that district in the Senate of Virginia. Intellectually and physically a giant, he looked like a man who had before him a century of life. In the prime of his years, and strength and usefulness, he has been cut down. He leaves behind hosts of admiring friends to lament his loss and cherish his memory. Mr. Coleman waf admiring friends to lament his loss and cherish his memory. Mr. Coleman was long engaged in the instruction of youth in Virginia, and many of the most distinguished men of the State were educated, moulded, fashioned, and made what they are by him. We may hereafter have occasion to speak again of some of the peculiar, original and attractive characteristics of this remarkable man, who, in every position which he ever held, would have done honor to the best days and the best men of Virginia.
Candidates. --There are two candidates for the vacancy occasioned in the Virginia Senate by the death of Frederick Coleman, from the Fredericksburg district. They are Messrs. W. S. Gilman and Dr. W. D. Quisenberry.
a Notary Public. Joe Cox, free negro, was granted a new register. License was granted to the proprietors of the Exchange Hotel to keep an ordinary. The prosecution against them for keeping an ordinary without license grew out of their mistaking the Sheriff's receipt for the tax on their license for the license itself. A nolle prosequi was entered in the case, they paying the costs. (Absent--Messrs. Beveridge and Sadler.) License to keep an ordinary was granted to Frederick Coleman. Edward S. Gentry's case, an appeal from the decision of the Mayor, who had ordered him to be whipped for using insulting language to a white person, came up, and the said decision was reversed, and the appellant discharge. The Court, however, though formally applied to, refused to grant said Gentry a certificate that he is a person of mixed blood, and not a negro; to which latter opinion of the Court Gentry excepted, and took leave to file his bill of exceptions to-day. Mis