Your search returned 24 results in 7 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 19: events in the Mississippi Valley.--the Indians. (search)
, between Olive and Pine Streets. As some troops were passing, a pistol-shot was fired among them from a fire enginehouse. They were alarmed and confused, and commenced firing upon the people in the street, in all directions. Several persons were killed and others were wounded. Quiet was soon afterward restored. the city of St. Louis (which remained under Union control) was spared from other scenes of bloodshed during the war. Statements made to the author by Colonel F. A. Dick, John Coleman, Jr., and other eye-witnesses: Oration, by Charles D. Drake, on the Anniversary of the capture of Camp Jackson, May 11, 1868. Proclamation of General W. S. Harney, May 14, 1861. Life of General Lyon: by Ashbel Woodward, M. D. When all the facts became known, the conduct of Captain Lyon was approved by his Government, and by the loyal people of the country. By his promptness and skill, and with the assistance of hosts of loyal and zealous men, he W. S. Harney saved the Arsenal and the ci
head; Corporal W. Williams, in face; John Garner, A. Carnahan, killed; George A. Peet, dangerously wounded and missing; P. Brady, wounded in foot; Wm. Fischer, leg; H. S. Henneman, foot; J. Koltoff, head; P. Cramig, thigh; J. R. Lamb, leg, slightly; E. Myers, shoulder; T. S. Rice, arm and leg; T. Wright, hip, slightly. Company F--Lieut. James Kinkead, hand; Sergeant Jesse McLean, arm, (severe;) Sergeant James Carr, do.; Corporal Michael Boyle, leg; Corporal John Springmeyer, neck; Corporal John Coleman, leg; Corporal James Reynolds, hand; Corporal H. Brokamp, arm; privates, Reuben Daily, face; Charles Hinch, leg; Isaac Baum, wounded and missing; Charles Viner, hand; Richard Henniger, killed; privates, W. Drexillieus, killed; Henry Huier, killed; John Slossner, wounded in leg, (severe;) John McQuirk, do. Company G--Wounded: Lieut. C. F. McKenzie, arm; Sergeant Wilson Gregg, since died; Corporal C. B. Spennett, in leg; Thomas Mundy, in leg; W. F. Ransom, in wrist; R. Connolly, fac
head; Corporal W. Williams, in face; John Garner, A. Carnahan, killed; George A. Peet, dangerously wounded and missing; P. Brady, wounded in foot; Wm. Fischer, leg; H. S. Henneman, foot; J. Koltoff, head; P. Cramig, thigh; J. R. Lamb, leg, slightly; E. Myers, shoulder; T. S. Rice, arm and leg; T. Wright, hip, slightly. Company F--Lieut. James Kinkead, hand; Sergeant Jesse McLean, arm, (severe;) Sergeant James Carr, do.; Corporal Michael Boyle, leg; Corporal John Springmeyer, neck; Corporal John Coleman, leg; Corporal James Reynolds, hand; Corporal H. Brokamp, arm; privates, Reuben Daily, face; Charles Hinch, leg; Isaac Baum, wounded and missing; Charles Viner, hand; Richard Henniger, killed; privates, W. Drexillieus, killed; Henry Huier, killed; John Slossner, wounded in leg, (severe;) John McQuirk, do. Company G--Wounded: Lieut. C. F. McKenzie, arm; Sergeant Wilson Gregg, since died; Corporal C. B. Spennett, in leg; Thomas Mundy, in leg; W. F. Ransom, in wrist; R. Connolly, fac
enemy were repulsed; as they were also in two succeeding assaults. In the first assault, Major T. J. Hutchinson and John Coleman, of the Thirty-sixth Enrolled Militia of Franklin county, were wounded while working the guns in the fort. Major Hutchinson was wounded in the face, and John Coleman in the breast, both seriously, but neither mortally. Information was received through prisoners, that the enemy lost five men wounded; and there was one horse captured by us. Hostilities having ceaks, situated near the Owenton pike. The casualties of the assault were two wounded--Major T. J. Hutchinson, and private John Coleman of Thirty-sixth regiment of militia. Neither of the wounds are mortal; and both will soon recover. While you wsurrounding country. Of those in the fort, a young man named Hutchinson was shot in the mouth, and a man by the name of Coleman in the shoulder. Enemy's loss, if any, unknown. The females and children of Frankfort passed a tempestuous night. T
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
n of Edgefield county now called Saluda, September 12, 1836. His parents were Joel and Martha (Coleman) Abney. His great-grandfather, Nathaniel Abney, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, as was also his maternal grandfather, John Coleman. Mr. Abney was reared in Edgefield county on a farm, and farming has been the chief business of his life. During the excitement incident to the bombardmen of Edward and Caroline (Black) Coleman, both natives of Edgefield county. His grandfather, John Coleman, was a Revolutionary soldier, who served with the colonial troops from Virginia and fought in the battle of Eutaw Springs, besides several others. Mr. Coleman is of English descent on both sides. He was reared on his father's farm in Edgefield county. He determined to fit himself for the the Seneca oil mills. He was married in 1872 to Miss Ludie C. Merriman, of Greenwood, S. C. Mrs. Coleman is president of the federation of women's clubs of South Carolina, and is a woman of great ex
l, and proceeded about nine o'clock that night to the house, which they surrounded. A number of those in the house succeed ed in effecting their escape, but the following named parties (some of whom were in the North Point party arrested last June and subsequently discharged,) were taken into custody: John Clark, Edwin J. Clocker Amos Thompson, Jacob Smith, William Hoffman; Henry W. Ford, William Perry, John Watts, P. J. Swangler,--Ford, John Baldwin, Richard Stmpon, Willtan, Gross, John Coleman, Julius S. Bradford, Herman Stung, Patrick O'Rrten, J. F. Swatnisnec Weaver, Edward H. McCarthy, Jams Russell, John Fitzpatrick, David Some and Jack Hays, twenty-five in number They were all taken to the Eastern Pol Station, where they are at present detaine Interesting from Cairo — movement of the great expedition Southward; Cairo, Jan, 15. --Gen. Grant and staff embarked on the steamer Chancellor this morning, and took the field at Fort Jefferson. Dispatches had been
ime been sent to Richmond as a prisoner and lodged in Castle Thunder. Smurr, by his knowledge of the Valley and its people and their sentiments, was enabled to inflict much misery on his fellow-citizens, and richly deserved, if he has not received, condign punishment. Gen. Jones, our commander in the Valley, has seized on the following men and sent them to Richmond, to be retained in custody as hostages for the safe return of the citizens of Woodstock arrested by order of Milroy, viz: P. M. Jeffries, Wetzel county, Va., Duckett Gartree, Western Virginia; Rev. J. H. Jones, Ritchie co.; John Coleman, do.; Wm. White, do.; Patrick Croughan, do.; Henry Parker, Parkersburg, Va.; Wm. F. Sinsel, Taylor co., Va.; John Rooney, Patterson, Va.; A. C. Garey, Harrison co., Va.; Thos. D. Armstrong, Doddridge co.; Thos. Hill, Bridgeport, Va.; Wm. Brown, Preston, Va.; Geo. Snyder, Pendleton co., Va. Smurr was sent up to Rockbridge county two months ago to be tried for some of his numerous offences.