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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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o and captured four, one of whom is shot twice and not expected to live. I captured two good horses, five shot-guns, one Hall's rifle, and two pistols. The names of the prisoners are as follows: W. D. Farley, First Lieutenant South Carolina Volunteers, Captain on General Bonham's staff; F. De Coradene, Lieutenant Seventh South Carolina Volunteers; P. W. Carper, Seventh South Carolina Volunteers; F. Hildebrand, A. M. Whitten, Thirtieth Virginia Cavalry, taken at Drainesville, on picket; Thos. Coleman, citizen of Drainesville, dangerously wounded. We killed or captured all we saw. I cannot close the report without speaking of the splendid manner in which both men and officers behaved. The fine manner in which Majors Jones, Byrnes, Second Lieutenant Fifth Cavalry, and Burrows acted, cannot be too highly appreciated. All acted well, and I cannot but thus publicly express my admiration for their truly admirable behavior. Very respectfully, Geo. D. Bayard, Colonel First Penn. Regim
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
er of Company F, First South Carolina volunteers in the war with Spain. William T. Russel, M. D., surgeon of the Confederate States army, and now retired from a long and successful practice as a physician at Spartanburg, was born at Lewes, Del., in 1827. He is the son of William Russel, a native of Delaware, and a soldier of the war of 1812. His paternal ancestors, originally English, first settled in Broad-Kiln Hundred, Sussex county, Del., prior to 1700; and his maternal ancestor, Thomas Coleman, born in the north of Ireland, of Scotch parents, married Elizabeth Roe, and settled at Cornwall, Orange county, N. Y., about 1700. Dr. Russel was educated at Newark academy and Delaware college, being graduated at the latter in 1847, after which he began the study of medicine, and received his medical degree from the university of Pennsylvania in 1850. His first practice was at Canandaigua, N. Y., whence he removed to Spartanburg in 1854. At the beginning of hostilities in 1861 he was
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Margaret Smith's Journal (search)
worn before, the 4th of September, 1656, Edward Rawson. Thomas Philbrick testifieth that Goody Cole told him that if any of his calves did eat of her grass, she hoped it would poison them; and it fell out that one never came home again, and the other coming home died soon after. Henry Morelton's wife and Goodwife Sleeper depose that, talking about Goody Cole and Marston's child, they did hear a great scraping against the boards of the window, which was not done by a cat or dog. Thomas Coleman's wife testifies that Goody Cole did repeat to another the very words which passed between herself and her husband, in their own house, in private; and Thomas Ormsby, the constable of Salisbury, testifies, that when he did strip Eunice Cole of her shift, to be whipped, by the judgment of the Court at Salisbury, he saw a witch's mark under her left breast. Moreover, one Abra. Drake doth depose and say, that this Goody Cole threatened that the hand of God would be against his cattle, and