hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for A. H. Coleman or search for A. H. Coleman in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 6 document sections:

Ramsay, August 30, 1862. Captain G. M. Bascom, A. A.G.: sir: I send, herewith, the reports of Colonel White and Lieut.-Col. Coleman, commanding the Twelfth and Eleventh Ohio regiments in the recent affair at Bull Run. I have already rendered a rness to engage the enemy, and fight against every odds of numbers. I have made especial mention of Col. White and Lieut.-Col. Coleman and Hines. I should add the name of Major Jackson, of the Eleventh; and though such mention may seem a matter of merous officers killed and wounded, we have to mourn the loss of Col. Henry W. Kingsbury, Eleventh Connecticut; Lieut.-Col. A. H. Coleman, commanding Eleventh O. V. I.; Lieut.-Col. M. Clark, commanding Thirty-sixth regiment O. V. I., and Lieut.-Col.s. Furbay and Duffield, Thirtieth regiment volunteers, acting as aids to Col. Ewing, and who were both killed; Lieut.-Colonel A. H. Coleman, commanding Eleventh regiment volunteers, killed while gallantly leading his men; Lieut.-Col. J. D. Hines, Twe
Commanding First Division. Colonel Scammon's report. headquarters First provisional brigade, Kanawha division, Fort Ramsay, August 30, 1862. Captain G. M. Bascom, A. A.G.: sir: I send, herewith, the reports of Colonel White and Lieut.-Col. Coleman, commanding the Twelfth and Eleventh Ohio regiments in the recent affair at Bull Run. I have already rendered a report of the march, and I have only to transmit the detailed reports, with such remarks as I deem necessary to preserve a truby any troops whatever — for there was no faltering among them, nor was there the slightest appearance of any thing but eagerness to engage the enemy, and fight against every odds of numbers. I have made especial mention of Col. White and Lieut.-Col. Coleman and Hines. I should add the name of Major Jackson, of the Eleventh; and though such mention may seem a matter of course, I should be unjust were I not to bear witness to the coolness and efficient energy of Lieutenants Kennedy and Botsfor
fifty-seven were killed, one thousand seven hundred and forty-two wounded, and one hundred and twenty-three missing. Among numerous officers killed and wounded, we have to mourn the loss of Col. Henry W. Kingsbury, Eleventh Connecticut; Lieut.-Col. A. H. Coleman, commanding Eleventh O. V. I.; Lieut.-Col. M. Clark, commanding Thirty-sixth regiment O. V. I., and Lieut.-Col. Bell, commanding Fifty-first Pennsylvania. All these gallant officers were killed in the action whilst heroically leading tnels George Crook, commanding Second brigade, and Hugh Ewing, commanding First brigade, for energy and skilful bravery; Lieuts. Furbay and Duffield, Thirtieth regiment volunteers, acting as aids to Col. Ewing, and who were both killed; Lieut.-Colonel A. H. Coleman, commanding Eleventh regiment volunteers, killed while gallantly leading his men; Lieut.-Col. J. D. Hines, Twelfth regiment volunteers; Color-Sergeants White and Carter, who were both killed, and Corporals Howett, of company D, and Buc
Perry, in the arm; Timothy Dacey, in the arm; Thomas Rodgers, in arm and hand; Henry G. Rose, shoulder. Of the Zouaves none were killed, though many slight wounds were received. On the Shawsheen, Thos. Smith was seriously wounded through the head, and a few others on the same boat received some slight wounds. On the Perry, one powderboy — a contraband, named Stephen Jones — was killed, while bravely performing his duty, and Daniel Donovan, a seaman on the same boat, was wounded, and Mr. Coleman, the executive officer of the Ceres, had his pants torn by a rebel bullet while in the act of fixing a shell for the enemy, and a splinter sent into his throat from a ball which struck the deck near his head. Captain Woodward, Capt. Macdiarmid, and Capt. Flusser each had very narrow escapes. This victory is of great importance, inasmuch as it clears the way to Weldon. It is impossible to estimate the loss to the enemy, who, it is said, left some forty or fifty dead on the field. S
e half-section of light battery L, Second Missouri artillery, the whole under the command of Captain Bradway, marched from this place to attack the notorious Col, Coleman, who was said to be encamped at a place known as the Mountain Store, situated about twenty-five miles from here. When within five miles of the store, the advance-guard of the detachment came suddenly upon a band of sixty of Coleman's men, led by himself. We killed three of the rebels, wounded several, took fifteen prisoners, three horses, and six guns. From the prisoners we learned that Coleman had moved his camp to the right-hand fork of the Big Piney, near a Mr. Harrison's, and that whColeman had moved his camp to the right-hand fork of the Big Piney, near a Mr. Harrison's, and that when we met him, he was on his way to camp. On the morning of the twenty-sixth, we moved to attack the enemy's camp. After we had marched about two and a half miles, our advance met the enemy's pickets and drove them in. Hearing heavy and continuous firing, Capt. Bradway sent forward Capt. Call, with twenty men of his company, to
straggling was allowed, and although no discipline was observed, implicit obedience was maintained; for if a man declined or moved tardily, a blow from sabre or butt of a pistol enforced the order. It was stated by the men that four of the army had been shot for straggling since leaving Leesburgh. They were entirely in the dark as to their future movements, expecting, however, to go either to Baltimore or to Pennsylvania. During the day several medical officers called, among others a Dr. Coleman, Medical Director of Jackson. He was an Oily Gammon sort of an individual; very anxious about my instruments, quinine, etc.; but as we had either sent away or hidden these things, he got none. In the afternoon I saw brought in, a prisoner, one of the men of Best's battery--Sergeant Driscoll. Although no communication took place between us, I felt very certain that Banks's force was near at hand. From this circumstance all our hopes were much raised, but doomed to disappointment; fo