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James Russell Lowell, Among my books 56 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 8 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 7 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life. You can also browse the collection for Coleridge or search for Coleridge in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 4: a world outside of science (search)
wholly outside of all science. There is absolutely no point at which science can even begin to investigate it, because the first essential of scientific observation — the recurrence of similar phenomena under similar conditions — is wanting. Coleridge's poem of Kubla Khan was left hopelessly a fragment by the inconvenient arrival of a man from Porlock; but there is no ray of evidence that its continuation could have been secured by placing Coleridge, at the same hour next day, before the samColeridge, at the same hour next day, before the same table, with the same pens and paper, and planting a piece of artillery before the front door to compel every resident of Porlock to keep his distance. We have now the key to that atrophy on one side of Darwin's nature. It was in his case the Nemesis of Science — the price he paid for his magnificent achievements. Poetry is not a part of science, but it is, as Wordsworth once said, the antithesis of science ; it is a world outside. Thus far, as a literary man, I am entitled to go, and f<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 33: the test of talk (search)
the information of those around us, and one of the most familiar tests is that of talk. Emerson says that every man reveals himself at every moment; it is he himself, and nobody else, who assigns his position. Each the herald is who wrote His rank and quartered his own coat. After spending an hour in the dark with a stranger, we can classify him pretty surely as to education, antecedents, and the like, unless he has had the wit to hold his tongue. In that case he is inscrutable. In Coleridge's well-known anecdote the stranger at the dinner-table would forever have remained a dignified and commanding figure, had not the excellence of the apple-dumplings called him for a moment forth from his shell to utter the fatal words, Them's the jockeys for me. After that the case was hopeless; he had betrayed himself in five words. Of course the speaker might still have been a saint or a hero at heart, but so far as it went the test was conclusive. In Howells's Lady of the Aroostook t