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James Russell Lowell, Among my books 56 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 8 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 7 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana. You can also browse the collection for Coleridge or search for Coleridge in all documents.

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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 2: education (search)
ad to see, in your account of miscellaneous reading, authors of such inoppugnable orthodoxy as Coleridge and Carlyle. To Coleridge, though I have read but a moiety of his writings, I look up as to aColeridge, though I have read but a moiety of his writings, I look up as to a spiritual father; to me he is a teacher of wisdom. Apropos of Carlyle, in a recent letter to Mr. Emerson he says, that in preparing a second edition of the History of the French Revolution for the h, as knowing people who hear them say, are beautiful and profound. Mr. Dana is a disciple of Coleridge in philosophy. Dr. Walker is to deliver a course of twelve lectures on Natural Theology at th and acuteness I have great respect. When I have read I may receive it also. Have you read Coleridge? If not, let me once more advise you to do so. If you can get hold of The Friend I advise youas lately published a book on Emancipation, which is fully worthy of him, and a little book of Coleridge's, called Confessions of an Inquiring Spirit, has lately been republished. As for my own re
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 3: community life (search)
by study, reflection, and composition. Surely and steadily the idealist and dreamer was laying down his illusions and taking up the methods of a practical business-man. He was then, and remained throughout his life, devoted to idealism, poetry, and romance, but never after that time did he allow either to lead him away from the practical duties of the hour. It is worthy of passing notice that Dana for a part of this period also kept a book of quotations which abounds in extracts from Coleridge, Longfellow, Wordsworth, Carlyle, Motherwell, Cousin, Considerant, Fourier, Schiller, Goethe, Spinoza, Heine, Herman, Kepler, Bruno, Novalis, Bohme, Swedenborg, Virgil, Horace, Cicero, Thucydides, Euripides, and Sallust. It is still more worthy of notice that they were made always in the script and language in which they were written, whether it was English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Danish, Latin, or Greek. These extracts consist of lofty thoughts and sentiments, wh
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Appendix: Brook Farm — an address delivered at the University of Michigan on Thursday, January 21, 1895: (search)
longer possessed the fine library that he had previous to our experiment; it was sold to pay off the creditors. We were all proud of the fact, though he never spoke of it. And in a general way our experience was duplicated by the other associations or phalanxes. Without our special misfortune they all came to a similar end. I don't know of one of them that lasted till 1860. That is the story of the socialist movement of that day, and it certainly went far beyond the dreams with which Coleridge and Southey and their friends are said to have entertained their youth a hundred years before. We may say that, as a reform of society, the movement accomplished nothing. But what it did accomplish was a great deal of good for those who were concerned in it and no great loss for any of those who furnished money. Still the questions remain: Is the theory sound? Is that sort of social reform practicable? Fourier said it was, and that in the revolutions of time it would be brought about
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
orcelains, 503-505. Chorpenning claim, 425. Chronotype, Daily, 59, 63. Cicero, 56. Citico Creek, 291. Clark, Bayard, 144. Clay, Clement C,, 359, 360. Clay, Henry, 98, 115, 152. Clayton, Senator, 142, 145. Cleveland, Grover, 460, 462, 465, 469, 472, 475, 480, 483, 490. Codman, J. T., 45. Coffee Club of Buffalo, 10, 29. Coffee, Titian J., 427. Cold Harbor, 320, 322-329. Coldwater River, 207. Collamer, Senator, 153. Collector of Customs, 407. Collins line, 131. Coleridge, 21, 26-28, 56. Colored troops, 235. Columbus, Tennessee, 204. Commerce, editorial on, 51. Commercial Advertiser, 62. Comstock, Colonel, 325, 352. Concord, Massachusetts, 26. Conkling, Roscoe, 45, 195, 357. Considerant, Victor, 56, 66, 136. Consolidation of military departments, Mississippi Valley, 267, 268. Continental Union Association, 477. Cooper, 47. Corbin's Bridge, 319. Corinto affair, 471. Cornell, Alonzo B., Surveyor of Port of New York, 413. Corpora