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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 11 3 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for E. R. Colhoun or search for E. R. Colhoun in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The boat attack on Sumter. (search)
s Island, requested the admiral to send a monitor up as near as practicable to Battery Gregg to frustrate any attempt in this direction, and the present Rear-Admiral E. R. Colhoun with the Weehawken was finally selected for the duty. In carrying out these orders the monitor grounded badly within easy range of the Confederate battgrounded monitor landed in Moultrie and exploded a magazine; this elicited loud cheers from sailors and soldiers, and the admiral signaled, Well done, Weehawken. Colhoun was defending his vessel vigorously and valiantly when, by 11 A. M., the iron-clads moved into position and opened a strong fire on the Sullivan's Island batteries. Colhoun was then left in peace and afforded an opportunity to arrange for the liberation of his vessel from her extremely perilous position. About 4 p. M. she floated. About 1:30 P. M., as we were heaving up the Patapsco's anchor, in obedience to the signal, Withdraw from action, our engine was disabled from the effect of our
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.7 (search)
Dawn, Act. Lieut. John S. Barnes, Act. Master James Brown, 2 32-pounders, 1100-pounder Parrott, 1 20-pounder Parrott, 1 12-pounder howitzer; Mercedita, Com. H. S. Stellwagen; Quaker City, Com. J. M. Frailey; Commnodore McDonough, Lieut.-Com. George Bacon, 1 9-inch pivot, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 2 50-pounder ]Dahlgren rifles, 2 24-pounder S. B. howitzers; Potomska, Act. V.-Lieut. William Budd, 5 guns; E. B. Hale, Act. Lieut. E. Brodhead, 4 32-pounders, 130-pounder Parrott pivot; Lodona, Com. E. R. Colhoun, 1100-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 30-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 9-inch, 4 24-pounder S. B. howitzers; Norwich, Com. J. M. Duncan, 4 8-inch, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 1 12-pounder rifle howitzer; Wamsutta, Act. V.-Lieut. J. W. Kittredge, 4 32-pounders, 1 20-pounder Parrott, 1 12-pounder rifle howitzer; Keystone State, Com. W. E. Le Roy, 6 8-inch, 2 32-pounders, 1 50-pounder Dahlgren, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 2 12-pounder rifle howitzers; Madgie, Act. Master F. B. Meriam, 1 30-pounder Parrott pivot
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
nd appeared as though seen through a smoked glass. One Sunday morning a man was seen waving a white handkerchief in front of a handsome dwelling. Captain Phelps and myself stopped and went ashore to inquire the reason. He told us his name was Colhoun; that he was a brother of Captain Colhoun of the United States navy; that, being over age, he had taken no part in the conflict, but had remained at home cultivating his plantation. With tears in his eyes he told us that that night his cotton pCaptain Colhoun of the United States navy; that, being over age, he had taken no part in the conflict, but had remained at home cultivating his plantation. With tears in his eyes he told us that that night his cotton pile, of 5000 bales, had been set on fire, and his ginhouse, costing $30,000, destroyed. He was a rich man the night before, and the morning found him penniless. A bale of cotton was worth at that time $400 in New Orleans, so that he had lost at a single blow $2,000,000. He was but one of many innocent persons who suffered the loss of all their property through this indiscriminate destruction. [See p. 372.] Our supply of coals having given out, we were dependent upon fence rails for fuel.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
ision, Commodore Joseph Lanman; Third division, Commodore Jas. Findlay Schenck; Fourth division, Commodore S. W. Godon; iron-Clad division, Commodore Wm. Radford. Flag-ship. Malvern, Lieut. William B. Cushing (1st attack); Lieut. B. H. Porter (k), (2d attack). Iron-Clads. Canonicus, Lieut.-Com. George E. Belknap. Mahopac, Lieut.-Com. E. E. Potter (1st attack); Lieut.-Com. A. W. Weaver (2d attack). Monadnock, Com. E. G. Parrott. New Ironsides, Commo. William Radford. Saugus, Com. E. R. Colhoun. Screw frigates. Colorado, Commo. H. K. Thatcher. Minnesota, Commo. Joseph Lanman. Wabash, Capt. M. Smith. Side-wheel steamers (1st class). Powhatan, Commo. J. F. Schenck. Susquehanna, Commo. S. W. Godon. Screw sloops. Brooklyn, Capt. James Alden. Juniata, Capt. W. R. Taylor (1st attack); Lieut.-Com. T. S. Phelps (2d attack). Mohican, Com. D. Ammen. Shenandoah, Capt. D. B. Ridgely. Ticonderoga, Capt. C. Steedman. Tuscarora, Com. J. M. Frailey. Screw gun-vessels.