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Daoz, marine, slightly; Francis Pepper, marine, slightly; John Brogan, marine, slightly; John C. Harris, lieutenant of marines, slightly; Shultz Gerard, Acting Master, slightly; John C. Hadley, Third Assistant Engineer, slightly; Wilson Goodrich, boatswain, slightly; Joseph B. Cox, carpenter, slightly; Alfred Reynolds, Master's Mate, slightly; George Dolliver, slightly. Total, thirty-three. On the Richmond — John Gordon, seaman, severely; Charles A. Benson, ordinary seaman, slightly; Ed. Collins, ordinary seaman, slightly; John Ford, seaman, slightly. Total, four. On the Iroquois — James Noland, seaman, mortally; Walter J. White, corporal of marines, mortally; Robert Lewis, armorer, severely; George Clark, gunner, severely; Robert Greenleaf, seaman, severely; John Smith, boy, severely; Martin Winter, boatswain's mate, severely; John Brown, captain of maintop, slightly; John Conway, ship's corporal, slightly; George Higgins, seaman, slightly; Benjamin Rockwell, seaman, slightl
nd on the west. March 13, 1657: Samuel Adams sells to Ed. Collins forty acres of land; bounded on the east by Zachariah Sy, on the south and west by James Garrett. Paid £ 10. Ed. Collins sells to Edward Michelson five and a half acres on the hnd long meadow. March 13, 1675: Caleb Hobart sells to Ed. Collins, for £ 660, five hundred acres in Meadford, now in posserooks's and Wheeler's lands westerly. March 29, 1675: Ed. Collins sells a piece of land to Daniel Markham; bounded by the orth, and by Caleb Hubbard on the east. Jan. 3, 1676: Ed. Collins sells thirty acres of land to George Blanchard. Ed. ColEd. Collins was now seventy-three years old. The Blanchard farm was a large one, and is frequently mentioned in the records. Me few, but rich: he came over in June, 1632. The names of Collins and Russell survived only a short period. The first boundr his death, a part of his farm in Medford was sold to Mr. Ed. Collins, who pays to Mrs. Cradock £ 120, to Samuel Cradock and
ptain Cooke, Mr. Holliocke, and Mr. John Oliver, the contents of four mile square. Mr. Carter, the first minister of Woburn, was ordained 1642, when seventy-seven ministers had been ordained in New England. 1642.--Confederation against the Indians recommended by the General Court. May 10, 1643.--The General Court appointed a committee to lay out a road from Cambridge to Woburn. 1643.--Middlesex was the first to recommend and adopt the division of territory into counties. Mr. Edward Collins was chosen by Cambridge a representative in the General Court; but he did not attend. They required him to give reasons for his neglect, or pay twenty shillings. 1644.--Medford was called to mourn the death of its founder, Matthew Cradock, Esq.; and, in 1649, lost a friend and neighbor, in the death of Governor Winthrop. 1644.--It was customary with the early settlers in Medford to attend public worship in the neighboring towns when they had no preaching within their own plantat
rook, Whitmore's, Marble, &c., 9. Brooks family, 506. Brooks, 19, 29, 34, 36, 43, 49, 51, 53, 55, 65, 72, 106, 109, 112, 114, 126, 127, 161, 164, 185, 197, 225, 255, 265, 285, 307, 315, 411, 545, 563, 569, 570. Brown, 509. Brude, 87. Buel, 51. Bugbe, 36. Bunker, 43. Burden, 36. Burgess, 441. Burying-grounds, 425. Call, 36. Chadwick, 509. Chairmen, Board of Selectmen, 126. Child, 315. Chubb, 509. Clark, 509. Cleaveland, 509. Clough, 509. Collins, 34, 36, 41, 42, 43, 93. Colman, 208, 221, 232, 304. Communion-plate, 265. Converse, 3, 36. Cooke, 36. Crackers, Medford, 388. Cradock family, 509, 510. Cradock, 2, 3, 14, 33, 39, 40, 41, 42, 44, 46, 47, 59, 83, 87, 88, 92, 410, 431, 480. Crimes and Punishments, 431. Crisp, 36, 43. Cummings, 510. Currency, 401. Curtis family, 511. Dady, 37, 44. Danforth, 36. Davidson, 37, 42, 59, 74. Daustin, 36. Deane, 36. Degrusha, 109. Dexter family,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers who died of wounds. (search)
14. 1862.Oct. 3, 1862. Cole, John F.,35th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864.Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa., June 13, 1864. Cole, Rufus H., Jr.,19th Mass. Inf.,Sept. 17, 1862,Smoketown, Md., Oct. 5, 1862. Coleman, Martin J.,5th Batt. Mass. L. A.,– –Gettysburg, Pa., July 15, 1863. Colleran, Thomas,11th Mass. Inf.,– –Satterlee Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 7, 1864. Collingwood, Joseph W., Capt.,18th Mass. Inf.,Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.Near Falmouth, Va., Dec. 24, 1862. Collins, Edward,9th Mass. Inf.,– –Annapolis, Md., Nov. 28, 1861. Collins, Joseph H.,21st Mass. Inf.,Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.Near Falmouth, Va., Jan. 3, 1863. Collins, Samuel E.,19th Mass. Inf.,– –Fair Oaks, Va., June 25, 1862. Collins, William H.,1st Mass. H. A.,– –Washington, D. C., June 17, 1864. Collyer, James H. Name and rank.Command.When and Where Wounded.Date and Place of Death. Collyer, James H.,20th Mass. Inf.,– –Nov. 25, 1861. Coney, Barney,15th Ma
h Mass. Inf.,– –Smoketown, Md., Oct. 5, 1862. Colby, James J., Sergt.,34th. Mass. Inf.,– –Winchester, Va., Nov. 14, 1864. Colby, William C., Corp.,35th Mass. Inf.,South Mountain, Md., Sept. 14. 1862.Oct. 3, 1862. Cole, John F.,35th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864.Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa., June 13, 1864. Cole, Rufus H., Jr.,19th Mass. Inf.,Sept. 17, 1862,Smoketown, Md., Oct. 5, 1862. Coleman, Martin J.,5th Batt. Mass. L. A.,– –Gettysburg, Pa., July 15, 1863. Colleran, Thomas,11th Mass. Inf.,– –Satterlee Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 7, 1864. Collingwood, Joseph W., Capt.,18th Mass. Inf.,Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.Near Falmouth, Va., Dec. 24, 1862. Collins, Edward,9th Mass. Inf.,– –Annapolis, Md., Nov. 28, 1861. Collins, Joseph H.,21st Mass. Inf.,Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.Near Falmouth, Va., Jan. 3, 1863. Collins, Samuel E.,19th Mass. Inf.,– –Fair Oaks, Va., June 25, 1862. Collins, William H.,1st Mass. H. A.,– –Washing
. J., 448 Colby, W. C., 448 Colby, W. W., 346 Cole, A. M., 506 Cole, Andrew, 65 Cole, F. B., 346 Cole, J. F., 448 Cole, R. H., Jr., 448 Cole, W. H., 506 Coleman, C. S., 506 Coleman, H. D., 346 Coleman, L. M., 506 Coleman, M. J., 448 Coleman, P. M., 346 Coleman, W. J., 65 Colgrove, S., 96, 101 Collar, H. A., 346 Colleran, Thomas, 448 Collingill, John, 346 Collingwood, J. W., 79, 448 Collins, A. J., 506 Collins, Albert, 506 Collins, C. R., 506 Collins, E. G., 506 Collins, Edward, 448 Collins, G. S., 346 Collins, Garrett, 346 Collins, H. A., 346 Collins, H. S., 346 Collins, J. H., 77, 448 Collins, James, 491 Collins, John, 22d Mass. Inf., 346 Collins, John, 39th Mass. Inf., 506 Collins, Patrick, 9th Mass. Inf., 346 Collins, Patrick, 39th Mass. Inf., 506 Collins, Peter, 346 Collins, S. E., 448 Collins, Timothy, 11th Mass. Inf., 346 Collins, Timothy, 21st Mass. Inf. 346 Collins, W. E., 506 Collins, W. H., 448 Collins, W. S., 436 Collins, William
e buy a house in the town; also to Bro. Edward Oakes, Tho. Oakes, and Richard Hildreth, each of them a farm for their encouragement, if they see it may make for their support and desire it. Further, it is granted to Mr. Henry Dunster and Mr. Edward Collins liberty to have their small farms at Shawshine, and to be considered in their quantity more than others in regard of their work and place. April 1649. Agreed, that Mr. Henry Dunster, President of Harvard College, should have 500 acres, whereof 400 is granted by the town to his own person and heirs, to enjoy freely forever, and the other 100 acres for the use of Harvard College. Item, unto Mr. Daniell Googine 500 acres. Item, unto Mr. Edward Collins, in lieu of his small farm within the town bounds, with some addition in respect of his place in the Deacon's office, it was agreed that he should have 500 acres. June 9, 1652. It was agreed by the Church that Shawshine should be divided as followeth:— To M
ither again; which made him take a more particular leave than otherwise he would have done. Sixth day, Nov. 10, 1699. Mr. Danforth is entombed about 1/4 of an hour before 4 P. M. Very fair and pleasant day; much company. Bearers: on the right side, Lt-Governor, Mr. Russell, Sewall; left side, Mr. W. Winthrop, Mr. Cook, Col. Phillips. I helped lift the corpse into the tomb, carrying the feet. In the long and perilous conflict on behalf of chartered rights, Gookin and Danforth were supported by their brethren the Deputies from Cambridge, all good men and true. Deacon Edward Collins was Deputy from 1654 to 1670, without intermission; Edward Oakes, 1659, 1660, 1669-1681; Richard Jackson, 1661, 1662; Edward Winship, 1663, 1664, 1681-1686; Edward Jackson, 1665-1668, 1675, 1676; Joseph Cooke, 1671, 1676-1680; Thomas Prentice, 1672-1674; Samuel Champney, 1686, and again, after the Revolution, from 1689 to 1695, when he died in office. Their names should be in perpetual remembrance.
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
r; but his second attempt was successful, and he arrived at Boston Oct. 3, 1635, with his wife, child, brother Samuel, Mr. Harlakenden, Mr. Cooke, &c. Besides these, he mentions among the brethren who shared his unsuccessful attempt to cross the ocean, and who afterwards became members of his church, brothers Champney, Frost, subsequently Ruling Elders, Goffe, and diverse others, most dear saints. He also acknowledges special acts of kindness rendered to him in England by Mr. Russell, Mr. Collins, and Mrs. Sherborne,— names afterwards familiar in Cambridge. Two days afterwards, he came to Cambridge and took lodgings at the house of Mr. Stone. The reasons, says he in his Autobiography, which swayed me to come to New England, were many. 1. I saw no call to any other place in Old England nor way of subsistence in peace and comfort to me and my family. 2. Diverse people in Old England of my dear friends desired me to go to New England, there to live together, and some went befor
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