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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 54 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 46 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for John A. Collins or search for John A. Collins in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
93, 149; Mss. Feb. 23, 1841, R. Wardlaw to J. A. Collins, and May 2, 1841, Collins to W. L. G.; andtemporarily Lib. 11.11; Ms. Mar. 2, 1841, J. A. Collins to W. L. G. Lib. 11.23, 55, 79; 14: 31; Msnd. In fact, Phelps's Mss. Apr. 3, 1841, J. A. Collins to W. L. G., May 2, 1841, E. Pease to Collnal American A. S. Society Unchanged. By John A. Collins, Representative of the A. A. S. S. Glasgo return of our friends Phillips, Chapman, and Collins infuses new life into the general mass. The tate House on Jan. 27, 1842 (Lib. 12.26). Collins, at Mr. Garrison's instance, Lib. 15.75, froion, with his diploma written on his back, as Collins used to say, proved an invaluable accession tFrench and two other boys, as Quincy wrote to Collins, print it for nothing, asking only board and y said, and as was, Ms. Jan. 30, 1841, to J. A. Collins. indeed, the fashion of a come-outer perio farm. . . . in the spring. Ms. Quincy to J. A. Collins. The idea of Brook Farm, as it was hencefo[7 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
l (ante, 2: 434). Early on Monday morning, I left in the cars for Rochester, Nov. 14. and arrived at that place in the afternoon, where I met with a most cordial reception from friends Post, Burtis, and others. Isaac Post, Lewis Burtis, J. A. Collins. Dear bro. Collins, to our astonishment, arrived from Buffalo the same evening, in feeble, but improved, health. Collins is now acting as General Agent, pro tempore, of the National Society (Ms. July 8, 1842, W. L. G. to G. W. Benson). Abbybeen a special curiosity to see and hear me; and it is a satisfaction to me to know that my remarks have been received with much favor generally. On Friday afternoon, I started from Rochester for Farmington, Nov. 18. 1842. in company with J. A. Collins, J. C. Hathaway, and Abby Kelley, in Joseph's team. It was a very blustering and severe day, and Joseph C. Hathaway. we suffered considerably from the cold, but had a warm reception on our arrival at Farmington. The next day, we had two N
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
who sustained them, passed by an almost unanimous vote. The Non-Resistance question, the Property question (on which Collins is horsed just at present, and galloping away at a great Lib. 13.67. rate), as well as the Temperance question and multd and in fact done by them. In this Committee the question of the removal to Boston was urged vehemently by Garrison, Collins, Foster, Abby Kelley, and others, and was apparently well received by all the rest except the members of the Boston Cliqdiscussion of the questions pertaining to the reorganization of society and the rights of property, Lib. 13.91. in which Collins took a leading part. He heard nothing which attracted him to the doctrines advocated. On Dec. 16, 1843, Mr. Garrison wrote to H. C. Wright in Dublin (Ms.): John A. Collins is almost entirely absorbed in his Community project at Skaneateles, and is therefore unable to do much directly for the antislavery cause. He goes for a community of interest, and against all