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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 33 7 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 3 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 1, 1864., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 11, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Napoleon Collins or search for Napoleon Collins in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 6 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
he following is a list of vessels which comprised the fighting squadron of Flag Officer Dupont, which operated in line ahead, steaming in an ellipse from the commencement to the close of the action. Steam frigate Wabash (flagship), Commander C. R. P. Rodgers; steam frigate Susquehanna, Captain I. L. Lardner; steam sloop Mohican, Commander S. W. Godon; steam sloop Seminole, Commander J. P. Gillis; steam sloop Pawnee, Lieut.-Commanding R. H. Wyman; steam gunboat Unadilla, Lieut-Commanding N. Collins; steam gunboat Ottawa, Lieut.-Commanding T. H Stevens; steam gunboat Paulina, Lieut.-Commanding J. P. Bankhead: sailing sloop Vandalia, Commander F. S. Haggerty, towed by steamer Isaac Smith. Bombardment and capture of forts Walker and Beauregard at Port Royal entrance by the naval expedition under Flag officer S. F. Dupont. The flanking squadron consisted of the steam gunboat Bienville, Commander Charles Steedman, leading ship; steam gunboat, Seneca, Lieut.-Commanding Daniel Ammen;
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
h and the repulse of Yankee gun-boats. Ogeechee Sound and the Great Ogeechee River were examined and no batteries found. A full reconnoissance was accomplished, by which the Commander--in chief was placed in possession of information that would much facilitate any operations of the Army and Navy which might be decided on in the future. On December 5th Commander Drayton again proceeded on a reconnoissance to Saint Helena Sound in the Pawnee, accompanied by the gunboats Unadilla, Commander N. Collins, Isaac Smith, Lieut. Commander J. W. Nicholson, and Coast Survey steamer Vixen, Captain Boutelle. He reached the anchorage off the fort on Otter Island at mid-day; pushed on up Mosquito Creek (no doubt appropriately named), but found no traces of white people, except some burning buildings on Hutchison's Island. Very little was effected to repay this expedition, yet what fine harbors were found for blockade runners, what places of safety for our fleets to lie in during winter stor
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
dgers, the leading ship; the frigate Susquehanna, Captain J. L. Lardner; the sloop Mohican, Commander S. W. Godon; the sloop Seminole, Commander J. P. Gillis; the sloop Pawnee, Lieutenant-Commander R. H. Wyman; the gun-boat Unadilla, Lieutenant-Commander N. Collins; the gun-boat Ottawa, Lieutenant-Commander T. H. Stevens; the gun-boat Pembina, Lieutenant-Commander J. P. Bankhead; and the sailing sloop Vandalia, Commander F. S. Haggerty, towed by the Isaac Smith, Lieutenant-Commander J. W. A. Niave found it expedient to take. Any information you may have it in your power to collect, concerning the state of the surrounding country, will be valuable. S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Lieutenant Napoleon Collins, U. S. N., United States Gun-boat Unadilla, Port Royal harbor. Letter commending the officers of the Curlew by Acting-Lieutenant-Commander Watmough. United States Gunboat Curlew, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 17, 1861. Sir-It a
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
dgers, the leading ship; the frigate Susquehanna, Captain J. L. Lardner; the sloop Mohican, Commander S. W. Godon; the sloop Seminole, Commander J. P. Gillis; the sloop Pawnee, Lieutenant-Commander R. H. Wyman; the gun-boat Unadilla, Lieutenant-Commander N. Collins; the gun-boat Ottawa, Lieutenant-Commander T. H. Stevens; the gun-boat Pembina, Lieutenant-Commander J. P. Bankhead; and the sailing sloop Vandalia, Commander F. S. Haggerty, towed by the Isaac Smith, Lieutenant-Commander J. W. A. Niave found it expedient to take. Any information you may have it in your power to collect, concerning the state of the surrounding country, will be valuable. S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Lieutenant Napoleon Collins, U. S. N., United States Gun-boat Unadilla, Port Royal harbor. Letter commending the officers of the Curlew by Acting-Lieutenant-Commander Watmough. United States Gunboat Curlew, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 17, 1861. Sir-It a
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
rles Pease, Engineers: Acting-Chief, John Yates; Acting-First-Assistant, Wm. Tipton; Acting-Second-Assistants, J. S. G. Aspinwall and E. A. Bushnell; Acting-Third-Assistants, G. E. Savory, John Moquon, Leonard Pratt and E. B. Dyer; Boatswain, John Bates; Gunner, Andrew Wilson; Carpenter, G. E. Anderson. Steamer Michigan. Commander, John C. Carter; Paymaster, C. C. Jackson; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants, Win. Baas, Bennet Jones and Robert Reilly. Steamer Wachusett. Commander, Napoleon Collins; Lieutenant-Commander, L. A. Beardslee; Surgeon, Wm. M. King; Assistant-Paymaster, W. W. Williams; Acting-Master, J. H. Stimpson; Ensign, E. M. Shepard; Acting-Ensigns, Nicol Ludlow and C. J. Barclay: Acting-Master's Mates, C. R. Haskins, Reuben Rich and John Hetherington; Engineers: Chief, Win. H. Rutherford; Second-Assistants, Geo. W. Melville, M. Knapp and Edmund Lincoln; Third-Assistants, H. D. McEwen, R. S. Stedman and J. A. Barton; Boatswain, John Burrows; Acting-Gunner, Joh
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
tured. All this had its effect, and Commander Napoleon Collins, of the Wachusett, determined that tot do any more damage if he could prevent it. Collins thought of the violation of neutrality, and dfterwards claimed by the Brazilians that Commander Collins had promised to desist from his purpose ion. It would have been much better for Commander Collins to have waited outside for the coming of. The Federal Government at once disavowed Collins' action, and made ample apology, which the Gor. Secretary Welles give his sympathy to Commander Collins. and, although the Secretary did not ex have been disposed of in the same manner. Collins' action, indeed, met with the popular approvas' action in the case of the Florida. Commander Collins made little effort to defend his course.emand. The only punishment inflicted on Commander Collins was an order to take the Florida back told have been a most humiliating duty for Commander Collins to perform. When the sinking of the ves[3 more...]