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Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 8 2 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 4 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 1 1 Browse Search
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rch. Bragg resists Lew Wallace. the Kentucky brigade. Beauregard retreats. the rear-guard. abortive pursuit. arrest repulses Sherman. the artillery. Rev. Robert Collyer's account. losses. the fiercest fight of the War. the consequences. Grant, Sherman, and Buell. amenities in War. end of the campaign. Appendices p.rch. Bragg resists Lew Wallace. the Kentucky brigade. Beauregard retreats. the rear-guard. abortive pursuit. arrest repulses Sherman. the artillery. Rev. Robert Collyer's account. losses. the fiercest fight of the War. the consequences. Grant, Sherman, and Buell. amenities in War. end of the campaign. Appendices p.d by Sherman, and Lieutenant Brotzman by Hurlbut; and Buell speaks in high terms of the services of Mendenhall's, Terrell's, and Bartlett's batteries. The Rev. Robert Collyer, who went up to Pittsburg Landing with one of the first boats sent with comforts for those wounded in the battle, contributed to the Chicago Tribune some
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 7: Cambridge in later life (search)
cushions and they have to be put under ether and each quill pulled out by forceps. July 31, 1890 Last night I got up an entertainment in the Town Hall for the Dublin Library. There were beautiful tableaux arranged by artists, in a full-sized frame — mostly simple figures, Venetian, Swiss, etc. The unique one was a Madonna with children holding lilies (by Bellini), the Madonna being Mary Thayer, the artist's daughter, who has a singularly beautiful face. Dublin, July 13, 1902 Heard Collyer in a really remarkable sermon in his familiar way on the importance of being our individual selves in the future life. Animals he thought might live forever on earth, for they had no individuality to go on developing, apparently; but human beings needed spheres for constant development. The angel life as commonly described too vague; the angels never had fathers and mothers, never fell in love. He quoted a man who said he preferred hell to annihilation. Told us several good stories; as
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Index. (search)
Chapman, Mrs. Maria W., described by Whittier, 9-11; letter to, 68, 69. Child, Mrs., Lydia Maria, 82. Civil War, preparation at Worcester for, 154, 155; Bull Run, 156; Manassas, 157; Fort Donelson, 165, 166; Union sentiment at South, 166; anxiety, 166; effects of, 322, 323. Clarke, James Freeman, 162. Clemens, Samuel L., 234, 235; at home of, 270; fame of, 300; at Dublin, N. H., 330. Cleveland, Grover, political campaign, 324, 325. Colfax, Schuyler, Speaker, 250, 253. Collyer, Robert, 329. Conway, Moncure D., 279, 280, 286, 287. Cox, Hannah, 76. Crosby, Prof., Alpheus, 40, 41. Curson, Mrs., 6. Curtis, George William, described 46; slavery attitude, 71, 72. Curtis, Judge, 70. Cushing, Mrs., Betsey, 34, 35 Cushman, Charlotte S., 244, 265. D Dabneys, the; of Fayal, 125, 126, 133, 134, 136, 137; letter to, about Kansas, 142-44. Dame, Mrs., and Newport boardinghouse, 235, 246, 264. Dana, Charles, described, 13, 14, 46. Darley, Felix O. C., th
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XVI: the crowning years (search)
n 1905, Margaret was married, with her father's cordial approval, to a young Boston physician. The ceremony took place in the village church at Dublin, and Dr. Robert Collyer officiated. Fortunately his views about the heathen obey coincided with those of the bride's father. This clergyman was wont to relate in his own amusinghip with Colonel Higginson. When living in Chicago, he heard Higginson speak on physical training and utter an impressive warning against the use of mince pie. Dr. Collyer's curiosity was excited, and after the lecture he invested in one of the condemned viands. The consequence was, he declared, that his larder was ever after sto I e'er seem wise or bold With him a fortnight older? I never could be blithe as he Since he was always jollier: So I'll his faithful collie be With him forever Collyer. It is said that Higginson's opposition to church organization lessened in later life. He said himself, I am not sure of any change of attitude, though doubt
daughter of John Bright, 360. Clarke, Dr., Edward, 23. Clarke, James Freeman, influence of, 68, 85. Cleveland, Grover, impression of, 309. Coleridge, Lord, and Higginson, 360. Coleridge, E. Hartley, and Higginson, 349, 350. Collyer, Dr., Robert, and Higginson, 392, 393. Conference for Education in the South, at Birmingham, Ala., 365, 366. Conway, Moncure D., Higginson preaches for, 326, 327; at Besant trial, 329, 330; parish of, gives present to Higginson, 346, 347; Convenent, 388; musical poems, 388, 389; lectures before Lowell Institute, 389; 390; at Emerson celebration, 390; eightieth birthday celebration, 391; sons of Veterans Post named for, 391; at work on Stephen Higginson and Part of a Man's Life, 392; Robert Collyer, 392, 393; and church organization, 393, 394; activity, 394; delight in grandchildren, 394, 395; gradual withdrawal from active life, 395-99; Carlyle's Laugh and Descendants of the Reverend Francis Higginson, 396; interested in Simplified Sp
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 12 (search)
me as newspaper correspondent during the Civil War. He abandoned journalism after ten years or thereabouts, and became a member of the New York Stock Exchange without giving up his literary life, a combination apt to be of doubtful success. He married, at twenty, Laura Hyde Woodworth, who died before him, as did one of his sons, leaving only one son and a grand-daughter as his heirs. His funeral services took place at the Church of the Messiah on January 21, 1908, conducted by the Reverend Dr. Robert Collyer and the Reverend Dr. Henry van Dyke. Those who happen to turn back to the number of the Atlantic Monthly for January, 1898, will read with peculiar interest a remarkable paper entitled Our two most honored poets. It bears no author's name, even in the Index, but is what we may venture to call, after ten years, a singularly penetrating analysis of both Aldrich and Stedman. Of the latter it is said: His rhythmic sense is subtle, and he often attains an aerial waywardness of
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
me, but perhaps a little better for yesterday's massage. Gifts of flowers from many friends began early to arrive, and continued till late in the evening. The house was resplendent and fragrant with them. I worried somewhat about the evening's programme and what I should say, but everything went well. Kind Dr. Baker Flynt helped me, cushion and all, into Music Hall, and several gentlemen assisted me to the platform, where I was seated between the Chairman of the Festival Committee and Robert Collyer. ... I desired much to have the word for the occasion, but I am not sure whether I had. June 2. My first day of solitary confinement. ... To Laura 241 Beacon Street, June 2, 1897. As poor Susan Bigelow once wrote me:-- The Buffalo lies in his lonely lair, No friend nor agent visits him there. She was lame at the time, and I had once called her, by mistake, Mrs. Buffalo. Well, perfidious William, Dr. Wesselhoeft. rivalling in tyranny the Sultan of Turkey, has forbid
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 (search)
stand but little. May 5. A visit from Contessa di Taverna to confer with me about the new departure [the International Council of Women]. She says that the ladies will not promise to pay the stipulated contribution, five hundred lire once in five years, to the parent association. .. May 8. An exquisite hour with dear Maud on the terrace — the roses in their glory, red, white, and yellow; honeysuckle out, brilliant. We sat in a sheltered spot, talked of things present and to come. Robert Collyer to lunch. I asked him to say grace, which he did in his lovely manner. He enjoyed Maud's terrace with views of St. Peter's and the mountains. In the afternoon took a little drive. Several visitors called, among them Louisa Broadwood, from whom I learned that the little Committee for a Woman's Council is going on. The ladies have decided not to join the International at present, but to try and form an Italian Council first. Some good results are already beginning to appear in the
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
strated for some days, and made the return journey while still too weak to travel. Florence, who was with her, protested in vain. I would go, she said, if the hearse was at the door I A serious illness followed on her return. A month and more passed before she began to regain strength and spirits.1 March 31. Had a happy lighting up when I lay down for afternoon rest. Felt the immensity of God's goodness and took heart for the future. In April she records a delightful visit from Robert Collyer, accompanied by Annie Fields. I asked him: Robert, what is religion? He replied, To love God with all one's heart, Christ helping us. He began his prayer last Sunday thus: Our Father who art in heaven, on earth, and in hell! On April 13, she was out for the first time since February 14, when I returned sick from Baltimore ... . Another week and she was at her church, for the first time since January 18. It had been a long and weary time, yet one remembers not so much the suff
t, E. H., II, 320; verse by, 335. Cleveland, I, 365, 377; II, 139. Cleveland, Henry, I, 74. Cobb, Dr., II, 410. Cobbe, Frances P., I, 266, 314; II, 62. Cobden-Sanderson, Mr., II, 367. Cobden-Sanderson, Mrs., II, 367. Cochrane, Jessie, II, 240, 246, 249. Coggeshall, Joseph, I, 253; II, 57. Cogswell, J. G., I, 46, 104, 184. Colby, Clara, II, 180. Cole, Thomas, I, 42. Colfax, Schuyler, I, 378. Collegio Romano, II, 255. Colliers' Weekly, II, 391. Collyer, Robert, II, 62, 230, 255, 344. Cologne, I, 92; II, 173. Colonial Dames, II, 198. Colorado, I, 372. Columba Kang, II, 91. Columbia University, II, 227. Columbian Exposition, II, 107, 178, 181, 182, 184. Columbus, Christopher, I, 323; II, 178, 194, 244, 357. Combe, George, I, 95. Commonwealth, I, 141, 142. Concord, Mass., I, 152, 177; I, 57, 61, 77, 128, 194. Concord, N. H., I, 254. Concord Prison, II, 252. Concord School of Philosophy, II, 118, 119, 120, 1