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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
ront, .Jackson made his famous flank march, taking with him among other gallant commands the Georgia brigades of Thomas, Colquitt and Doles. The Twenty-third Georgia, of Colquitt's bri. gade, under Colonel Best, was left near the furnace to protect Colquitt's bri. gade, under Colonel Best, was left near the furnace to protect the wagon train. As the rear of this train was passing the furnace, an attack was made by the Federals. Colonel Best, aided by artillery, held the enemy in check until the train was safe, but a renewed attack resulted in the capture of the greater stopped the progress of the Federals in that quarter. In the advance that evening by Jackson's corps, the Georgians of Colquitt's and Doles' brigades were at the front, while Thomas was with that line under A. P. Hill which Jackson ordered in as hhe brigade went into action with 126 officers and 1,468 enlisted men, and lost 66 killed, 343 wounded and 28 missing. Colquitt's brigade was delayed in getting into the fight by a demonstration of Federal cavalry in flank, but reached the field in
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
ia and Florida, July to December, 1863. The operations on the south Atlantic coast during the summer of 1863 were mainly concentrated at Charleston, where General Colquitt and his brigade were on duty. Col. C. H. Olmstead's regiment (the First of Georgia), the Fifty-fourth and the Nineteenth were on duty at Battery Wagner prevn regiment, the Twelfth Georgia battalion. Other Georgia commands engaged at Charleston were the Sixth, Nineteenth, Twenty-third, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth, Colquitt's brigade; the Thirty-second and Fifty-fourth regiments, and Anderson's brigade, which arrived in September, including the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Eleventh and Fifty-ninth. Capt. J. R. Haines, commanding the Twenty-eighth, was killed September 5th by a mortar shell, and General Colquitt's aide, Lieut. James Randle, was mortally wounded August 29th. Others killed were Capt. C. Werner, First volunteers, July 11th, and Capt. A. S. Roberts, August 24th. Two batteries of the Twenty-second ar
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
chmond, and on May 15th the Fifty-sixth regiment was ordered up from Macon, and the Twelfth battalion and Forty-seventh and Fifty-fifth regiments from Savannah. Colquitt's Georgia brigade and Ransom's North Carolina brigade formed a division under General Colquitt, in Beauregard's forces for the defense of Petersburg. The brigadGeneral Colquitt, in Beauregard's forces for the defense of Petersburg. The brigade bore a creditable part in the battle near Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, which resulted in the bottling up of General Butler. Its loss was 11 killed and 146 wounded. In .the June battles before Petersburg, Colquitt's brigade fought in Hoke's division. Throughout the long siege which followed, the Georgians did their whole duty on tColquitt's brigade fought in Hoke's division. Throughout the long siege which followed, the Georgians did their whole duty on the Petersburg lines and before Richmond. Toward the last of June, Hampton's cavalry utterly defeated the expedition of Wilson and Kautz to the south and west of Petersburg. Again the Georgians of Young's brigade, under Col. G. J. Wright, had their full share of hardships and glory. Hampton in his report says: The pursuit
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
r defeated a movement of the enemy upon Hardee's right flank, and covered the retreat when Hardee withdrew. In the engagement at Rivers' bridge, February 3d, the Thirty-second and Forty-seventh regiments, Fifth reserves and Earle's battery, under Lieutenant-Colonel Bacon, were engaged and suffered a loss of 97 killed, wounded and missing. Hoke's division took a prominent part in the battle of Bentonville, and the heaviest losses in killed and wounded were sustained by the Georgians of Colquitt's brigade, the totals being 41 killed, 178 wounded, 23 missing. The last considerable military event in Georgia was the cavalry raid of Gen. James H. Wilson in April, 1865. He left Chickasaw, Ala., March 22d, with about 10,000 men, and after defeating and capturing a large part of what was left of General Forrest's cavalry at Selma, entered Georgia. Upton's division marched through Tuskegee toward Columbia, and Colonel LaGrange, with three regiments, advanced on West Point by way of Op
htly and fall back with a view of drawing him to the works. Next, Colquitt was ordered forward to support the cavalry and infantry, and next ossed the railroad. Here I halted for a moment, but observing General Colquitt forming his line, and seeing the position across the railroad ormed line of battle upon the left of that just established by General Colquitt. About this time the action became general. Being now at lonnd no ordnance train in sight. This I immediately reported to General Colquitt, who urged that we hold our ground, stating that ammunition wod their fire less rapid and effective. Under instruction from General Colquitt I now threw forward the Sixth and Thirtyond Georgia to flank rious arms for some miles, when night came on, and by order of General Colquitt we ceased firing and our line halted. Colonel Caraway Smithe I found our infantry and artillery under the command of Brigadier-General Colquitt, from whom I received orders to dispose of the cavalry on
allantly. Each regiment did its whole duty. I am also greatly indebted to Adjts. A. H. Pickett and Samuel H. Moore, of the Third and Twenty-sixth Alabama regiments, who acted as aides, for valuable services in fearlessly carrying and delivering orders. (954) Mentioned also in Col. J. M. Hall's report. (955-957) Report of Col. M. F. Bonham, commanding regiment. (959, 960, 961, 976) Mentioned in reports of Colonel Lightfoot, Sixth Alabama, of Colonel Pickens, Twelfth Alabama, and of Gen. A. H. Colquitt. (1052) Confederate roll of honor, battle of Chancellorsville, Third regiment of infantry of Alabama: Sergt. Walter Ransom, Company C; Sergt. George H. Ellison, Company E; Corp. H. H. Hardy, Company G; Private C. D. Rouse, Company H; Corp. W. H. Powers, Company K. Companies A, B, D, F and L declined voting. No. 44—(287) Third Alabama, Col. C. A. Battle, O'Neal's brigade, Rodes' division, army of Northern Virginia, at the battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863. (332, 342) 12 kil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Georgia Infantry. (search)
opography of the ground, that it was almost impossible to preserve the continuity of the line, and my left became temporarily detached from Colonel Mercer's right. I made a very rapid and oblique march towards the left to fill up the interval, which was not done until the charge through the thicket. As we emerged from the woods into the open field, we were greeted with heavy discharges of grape, but the gallant regiment advanced unfalteringly. I now discovered for the first time that General Colquitt's brigade was not on my right. I received instructions from General Doles, under these circumstances, to guard carefully my right flank. I continued to advance rapidly, and threw my left forward, in order to protect my right. Not seeing any enemy, and deeming the right secure—at least for a time—I determined to advance and fall in upon the flank of the battery which was still firing. To do this I advanced my right, retired the left, formed an oblique line of battle, and ordered a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
to end, was a memorable one. Although the most extensive preparations had been made to receive the large number of visitors, no one expected to see the host that visited the city, yet they were all cared for, and no complaints were heard. It is asserted on all sides that the parade, decorations, and everything connected with the jubilee excelled anything every witnessed in the South. The marshals. General Fitzhugh Lee, chief marshal; General John R. Cooke, chief of staff. Generals A. H. Colquitt, P. M. B. Young, Robert Ransom, Jr., Joseph R. Anderson, Cadmus M. Wilcox, James A. Walker, Robert F. Hoke, L. L. Lomax, W. B. Taliaterro, William R. Cox, Thomas L. Rosser, William H. Bate, Eppa Hunton, William H. Payne, James H. Lane, William McComb, G. M. Sorrel, T. M. Logan, E. M. Law, C. A. Battle, M. C. Butler, W. P. Roberts, Joseph Wheeler; Colonels William A. Morgan, William H. Palmer, Hilary P. Jones, Thomas H. Carter, R. H. Dulany, F. M. Boykin, H. Kyd Douglass, Henry T. Do
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee's Lieutenants. (search)
Columbia, S. C. James R. Chalmers, Vicksburg, Miss. Thomas L. Clingman, Charlotte, N. C. George B. Cosby, Kentucky. Francis M. Cockrell, St. Louis, Mo. A. H. Colquitt, United States Senate. R. E. Colston, Washington, D. C. Phil. Cook, Atlanta, Ga. John R. Cooke, Richmond, Va. M. D. Corse, Alexandria, Va. D. H. Cooper, rt B. Vance, have served in the House of Representatives, while Generals Wade Hampton, John B. Gordon, W. B. Bate, E. C. Walthall, J. T. Morgan, M. C. Butler, A. H. Colquitt, R. L. Gibson, and M. W. Ransom, have graced the United States Senate, and Generals Gordon, Hampton, Buckner, Fitzhugh Lee, Bate, Kemper, Bonham, Colquitt, HaColquitt, Haygood, Lowry, Marmaduke, McGowan, Nicholas, O'Neale, and Scales, have been Governors of their respective States. Time and space forbid further particulars, but we do not hesitate to say that after that sad day at Appomattox our Confederate soldiers—generals, colonels, captains, and privates alike—as a rule, instead of sitting d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.4 (search)
ppi. John Bratton, South Carolina. J. L. Brent, Baltimore. C. A. Battle, Newbern, North Carolina. R. L. T. Beale, The Hague, Virginia. Hamilton P. Bee, San Antonio, Texas. W. R. Boggs, Winston, North Carolina. Tyree H. Bell, Tennessee. William L. Cabell, Dallas, Texas. E. Capers, Columbia, South Carolina. James R. Chalmers, Vicksburg, Mississippi. Thomas L. Clingman, Asheville, North Carolina. George B. Cosby, California. Francis M. Cockrell, United States Senate. A. H. Colquitt (Georgia), United States Senate. R. E. Colston, Washington, D. C. Phil. Cook, Atlanta, Georgia. M. D. Corse, Alexandria, Virginia. Alexander W. Campbell, Tennessee. Alfred Cumming, Augusta, Georgia. X. B. DeBray, Austin, Texas. William R. Cox, Penelo, North Carolina. H. B. Davidson, California. T. P. Dockery, Arkansas. Basil W. Duke, Louisville, Kentucky. Joseph Davis, Mississippi City. John Echols, Louisville, Kentucky. C. A. Evans, Atlanta, Georgia. Samuel W.
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