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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial address (search)
before the world as one of the best and bravest of all our leaders. It was this same gift that enabled General Hill to select from the lieutenants of his regiment Robert F. Hoke to be made major of his regiment over ten competent captains. It was this intuitive perception of persistent pluck, dash and coolness that prompted him to love and honor George B. Anderson, William R. Cox, Bryan Grimes, Stephen D. Ramseur and Robert D. Johnston, and led him later to urge the advancement of Gordon, Colquitt and Doles, of Georgia. In June, 1861 (a few days after the fight at Bethel), in a letter to his wife he said of Stonewall Jackson, then a colonel in command of a brigade, I see that Jackson has had an engagement and taken many prisoners. I have predicted all along that Colonel Jackson would have a prominent place in the war. Battle of Bethel. On the 6th of June, 1861, Colonel Hill, then at Yorktown, was ordered to make a reconnoissance in force in the direction of Fortress Monroe, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
eorge D. Parker. Some fifteen minutes before the surrender, while lying on a stretcher near General Whiting, outside of the battery, witnessing the grand pyrotechnic display of the fleet over the capture of Fort Fisher, I was accosted by General A. H. Colquitt, who had been ordered to the fort to take command. I had a few minutes hurried conversation with him, informed him of the assault, of the early loss of a portion of the work and garrison, and that when I fell it had for a time demoralizriver, where she had watched the battle, should not be alarmed, spoke lightly of my wound. I asked him to carry General Whiting to a place of safety, as he came a volunteer to the fort. Just then the near approach of the enemy was reported and Colquitt made a precipitate retreat, leaving our beloved Whiting a captive, to die in a Northern prison. One more distressing scene remains to be chronicled. The next morning after sunrise a frightful explosion occurred. My large reserve magazine, w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
88. Charleston Convention of 1860, The, 154. Chew's Battery, 365. Chew, Col., Robt. Preston, 365. Chicago Light Artillery Co. A, its Claims as to Shiloh, 215. Chickamauga, Battle of, 141. Chickamauga. The C. S. Steamer, 278. Christmas of 1864, 272. Clark, Capt. M. H 310. Clayton, Gen. H. D, 146. Cleburne, Gen. P. R., 145; Anecdotes of, 299. Coke, Hon., Richard, 337. Coleman, Chew, 374. Cold Harbor. Battle of, 363, 368, 378, 380. Colorado, The, 269. Colquitt, Gen. A. H , 288. Colston, Gen. R. E., His Address before the Ladies' Memorial Association at Wilmington, N. C., 39. Confederate Camps, Papers of Value, 347. Confederate Point, 258 Confederate Soldier, The, his traits, 29, 221; trials, 34, 80; privations, 65, 359; morale of, 78; The Raw, 346. Confederate States Treasury Deposits, 304. Constitution, The Atlanta, Ga., cited, 165. Cornubia, The, 264. Crenshaw Battery, on the retreat from Gettysburg, 368. 374. Curtis, Gen.
, 199, 209, 250; IX., 348. Coldwater, Miss., II., 206; VI., 208. Cole, C. H., executed as a spy, VIII., 298. Cole, D., VIII., 281, 289. Coleman, C., VII., 21. Coleman, C. E., Confederate scout, VIII., 292. Colgrove, S., X., 203. Collins, N., VI., 271, 293, 294, 322. Colm's Battalion, I., 358. Colorado troops: Cavalry: First, I., 360: Second, I., 358, 360. Colorado,, U. S. S.: I., 352; III., 340; V., 267; VI., 48, 51, 188, 310. Colquitt, A. H., II., 67, 350; X., 113. Colston, F. M., I., 14; V., 72; X., 27. Colston, R. E., III., 322; X., 109. Colt,, C. S. S., VI., 106. Columbia, S. C.: State armory at, I., 33; III., 240, 241, 242, 243, 246, 251, 254, 256, 258, 342; V., 166; IX., 166: scene in, IX., 313. Columbia Flying Artillery I., 103. Columbia,, C. S. S., VI., 123. Columbia,, U. S. S., VI., 54. Columbiads: guns at Fort Totten, Va., V., 103; 10-inch guns, V., 133; 15-inch gu
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the war on the Rapidan. (search)
beyond the unfinished railroad, in order to take the enemy in the rear. A third brigade, under Colquitt, is sent to the neighborhood of Duerson's Mill to reinforce the extreme right. The battle is aroad: his own, under Colonel O'Neal, then Iverson's brigade to the left, Doles, and next to him Colquitt, on the right, Ramseur, with the fifth, remaining in rear, so as to fill up on the right the frve participated in the fight; for Iverson, on the left, has not encountered the Federals, while Colquitt, on the right, has remained in the rear in order to keep an imaginary enemy in check. Withous brigade, and then Iverson's, to the left of the road; on the other side Ramseur's and Doles'; Colquitt, still farther back, is held in reserve. As Hill's right was making the movement which was tght of the third Confederate line has not participated in the combat. Its turn comes at last. Colquitt, after several useless countermarches, is sent to the left to support Nicholls' brigade, whose
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Pennsylvania. (search)
ople had hoped that by a bold stroke the Fourth army corps might be placed in possession of this city. The Confederate government had sent all the troops it could dispose of to Lee, reducing those which guarded the capital and the coast to a figure which, compared with the garrison of Washington, was indeed insignificant, but less so than the clamors of the inhabitants of Richmond had led the Federals to suppose. Only three brigades had been left in North Carolina: Clingman at Washington, Colquitt at Kinston, and Martin at Weldon. But five brigades were stationed at Richmond and in its vicinity: Ransom and Jenkins, at the south, extended their lines as far as Petersburg; Wise and Cook along the suburbs of the city; finally, Corse at Hanover Junction. It is true that on the 24th the latter was sent to Gordonsville, leaving only one regiment behind him; but notwithstanding his departure the Confederates could yet muster eight or nine thousand men in the works which surrounded the ca
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 6 (search)
, 22d Batt. Va. 2d brigade, Brig.-gen. McGowan—1st, 12th, 13th, 14th S. C., Orr's Rifles. 3d brigade, Brig.-gen. Thomas—14th, 31st, 41st, 49th Ga. 4th brigade, Brig.-gen. Lane—17th, 18th, 28th, 33d, 37th N. C. 5th brigade, Brig.-gen. Archer—1st, 7th, 14th Tenn., 5th, 13th Batt. Ala. 6th brigade, Brig.-gen. Pender—13th, 16th, 22d, 34th, 38th N. C 2d division, Brig.-gen. Rodes (temporarily). 1st brigade, Brig.-gen. Rodes—3d, 5th, 6th, 12th, 26th N. C. 2d brigade, Brig.-gen. Colquitt—6th, 19th, 23d, 27th, 28th Ga. 3d brigade, Brig.-gen. Doles—4th, 12th, 21st, 44th Ga. 4th brigade, Brig.-gen. Ramseur—2d, 4th, 13th, 14th N. C. 5th brigade, Brig.-gen. Iverson—5th, 12th, 20th, 21st N. C. 3d division, Brig.-gen. Early. 1st brigade, Brig.-gen. Hays—5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th La. 2d brigade, Brig.-gen. Gordon—13th, 26th, 31st, 38th, 60th, 61st Ga. 3d brigade, Brig.-gen. Hoke—6th, 21st, 24th, 57th, 1st Batt. N. C. 4th brigade, Brig.
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the editor (search)
a, Col. J. M. Hall, Lt.-col. E. L. Hobson, Capt. W. T. Renfro, Capt. T. M. Riley. 6th Alabama, Col James N. Lightfoot. 12th Alabama, Col. Saml. B. Pickins. 26th Alabama, Col. E. A. O'Neal, Lt.-col. John S. Garvin, Lieut. M. J. Taylor. Colquitt's brigade. Brigadier-general A. H. Colquitt. 6th Georgia, Col. John T. Lofton. 19th Georgia, Col. A. J. Hutchins. 23d Georgia, Col. Emory F. Best. 27th Georgia, Col. C. T. Zachry. 28th Georgia, Col Tully Graybill. Ramseur's brigade. Brigadier-general A. H. Colquitt. 6th Georgia, Col. John T. Lofton. 19th Georgia, Col. A. J. Hutchins. 23d Georgia, Col. Emory F. Best. 27th Georgia, Col. C. T. Zachry. 28th Georgia, Col Tully Graybill. Ramseur's brigade. Brigadier-general S. D. Ramseur. Colonel F. M. Parker. 2d North Carolina, Col. W. R. Cox. 4th North Carolina, Col. Bryan Grimes. 14th North Carolina, Col. R. T. Bennett. 30th North Carolina, Col. F. M. Parker. Doles' brigade. Brigadier-general George Doles. 4th Georgia, Col. Philip Cook, Lt.-col. D. R. E. Winn. 12th Georgia, Col. Edward Willis. 21st Georgia, Col. J. T. Mercer. 44th Georgia, Col. J. B. Estes. Iverson's brigade. Brigadier-general Alfred Iverson. 5th North C
face badly; Serg'ts Elikbride Taylor, contusion of the arm; C M Fadeley, severely in the right shoulder; Corp'l G W Peacock, slightly in the arm; Private J P Bass, severely in the arm. Company I--Wounded: Private W A Dennis, in the arm. Company K--Wounded: Lieut I L Lake, in head and leg; Private E Redman, badly in the face. This regiment went into action with two hundred and twenty muskets. Total — killed, 4; wounded, 42; killed and wounded, 48. Casualties in Col. A. H. Colquitt's State Georgia regiment. Lieut Col Newton, slightly wounded. Adjutant Jas M Reid, severely wounded. Company A, Capt Arnold.--Killed: Ord'ly Sgt S M Knowles, Corp'l Geo F Lewis, Privates Duncan Brown, Jesse Hardeman, J A Perdu. Wounded: G M Amos, A M Hutchinson, John Keough, Sidney Blount, Irvin Johnson, F McClain, Jno T Tyus, Sgt S P Burnett, W H Brett, K Johnson, Jas Rogers, Missing: Sgt W H Stewart, W Martin. Company B, Capt Hannah.--Killed: Sgt A P Stovall, Pri
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