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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for A. H. Colquitt or search for A. H. Colquitt in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
L. Plane (H), J. A. Barclay (I), J. T. Lofton (K). This regiment served in Virginia until after Chancellorsville, then in North Carolina; also in Florida at Olustee, again in Virginia in 1864, and in North Carolina with Joe Johnston in 1865. Colonel Colquitt was promoted to brigadier-general and succeeded by J. T. Lofton, then by S. W. Harris. Lieut.-Col. James M. Newton being killed, his successors were W. C. Cleveland, J. T. Lofton, S. W. Harris and W. M. Arnold, who was killed in action. Maj. Beall (H), John T. Chambers (I), John W. Hooper (K). The greater part of the service of this regiment was in the army of Northern Virginia. At the time of the battle of Gettysburg it was in North Carolina. It went with the other regiments of Colquitt's brigade to Florida and shared in the victory at Olustee in February, 1864, and returned to Virginia in time for the defense of Petersburg. In 1865 it participated in the campaign of the Carolinas, surrendering with Johnston, April 26, 1865.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
ourth, 179 strong, under Capts. J. W. Beck and Samuel P. Lumpkin, were still at the front in this as in subsequent battles. Toward the close of this battle Longstreet and Jackson threw their forces to the relief of A. P. Hill, and defeated the Federal army. The Eighteenth Georgia, under Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff, took part in the famous assault of Hood's brigade, losing 16 killed and 126 wounded. Among the killed and mortally wounded were Lieutenants Dowton, McCulloch, Cone and Jones. Of Colquitt's brigade Gen. D. H. Hill said: The Sixth and Twenty-seventh Georgia, of this brigade, commanded by those pure, brave, noble, Christian soldiers, Lieut.-Col. J. M. Newton and Col. Levi B. Smith, behaved most heroically, and maintained their ground when half their number had been struck down. Lawton's brigade of the Stonewall division went into action about 5 o'clock in the evening, moving forward in perfect order through the woods and miry soil, guided only by the sound of the firing. I
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
ront, .Jackson made his famous flank march, taking with him among other gallant commands the Georgia brigades of Thomas, Colquitt and Doles. The Twenty-third Georgia, of Colquitt's bri. gade, under Colonel Best, was left near the furnace to protect Colquitt's bri. gade, under Colonel Best, was left near the furnace to protect the wagon train. As the rear of this train was passing the furnace, an attack was made by the Federals. Colonel Best, aided by artillery, held the enemy in check until the train was safe, but a renewed attack resulted in the capture of the greater stopped the progress of the Federals in that quarter. In the advance that evening by Jackson's corps, the Georgians of Colquitt's and Doles' brigades were at the front, while Thomas was with that line under A. P. Hill which Jackson ordered in as hhe brigade went into action with 126 officers and 1,468 enlisted men, and lost 66 killed, 343 wounded and 28 missing. Colquitt's brigade was delayed in getting into the fight by a demonstration of Federal cavalry in flank, but reached the field in
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
ia and Florida, July to December, 1863. The operations on the south Atlantic coast during the summer of 1863 were mainly concentrated at Charleston, where General Colquitt and his brigade were on duty. Col. C. H. Olmstead's regiment (the First of Georgia), the Fifty-fourth and the Nineteenth were on duty at Battery Wagner prevn regiment, the Twelfth Georgia battalion. Other Georgia commands engaged at Charleston were the Sixth, Nineteenth, Twenty-third, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth, Colquitt's brigade; the Thirty-second and Fifty-fourth regiments, and Anderson's brigade, which arrived in September, including the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Eleventh and Fifty-ninth. Capt. J. R. Haines, commanding the Twenty-eighth, was killed September 5th by a mortar shell, and General Colquitt's aide, Lieut. James Randle, was mortally wounded August 29th. Others killed were Capt. C. Werner, First volunteers, July 11th, and Capt. A. S. Roberts, August 24th. Two batteries of the Twenty-second ar
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
chmond, and on May 15th the Fifty-sixth regiment was ordered up from Macon, and the Twelfth battalion and Forty-seventh and Fifty-fifth regiments from Savannah. Colquitt's Georgia brigade and Ransom's North Carolina brigade formed a division under General Colquitt, in Beauregard's forces for the defense of Petersburg. The brigadGeneral Colquitt, in Beauregard's forces for the defense of Petersburg. The brigade bore a creditable part in the battle near Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, which resulted in the bottling up of General Butler. Its loss was 11 killed and 146 wounded. In .the June battles before Petersburg, Colquitt's brigade fought in Hoke's division. Throughout the long siege which followed, the Georgians did their whole duty on tColquitt's brigade fought in Hoke's division. Throughout the long siege which followed, the Georgians did their whole duty on the Petersburg lines and before Richmond. Toward the last of June, Hampton's cavalry utterly defeated the expedition of Wilson and Kautz to the south and west of Petersburg. Again the Georgians of Young's brigade, under Col. G. J. Wright, had their full share of hardships and glory. Hampton in his report says: The pursuit
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
r defeated a movement of the enemy upon Hardee's right flank, and covered the retreat when Hardee withdrew. In the engagement at Rivers' bridge, February 3d, the Thirty-second and Forty-seventh regiments, Fifth reserves and Earle's battery, under Lieutenant-Colonel Bacon, were engaged and suffered a loss of 97 killed, wounded and missing. Hoke's division took a prominent part in the battle of Bentonville, and the heaviest losses in killed and wounded were sustained by the Georgians of Colquitt's brigade, the totals being 41 killed, 178 wounded, 23 missing. The last considerable military event in Georgia was the cavalry raid of Gen. James H. Wilson in April, 1865. He left Chickasaw, Ala., March 22d, with about 10,000 men, and after defeating and capturing a large part of what was left of General Forrest's cavalry at Selma, entered Georgia. Upton's division marched through Tuskegee toward Columbia, and Colonel LaGrange, with three regiments, advanced on West Point by way of Op