Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for P. H. Colquitt or search for P. H. Colquitt in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 39 (search)
Battery, Captain John W. Mebane. Slocomb's Battery, Captain C. H. Slocomb. Reserve corps. Major-General W. H. T. Walker. Walker's division. Brigadier-General S. R. Gist. Gist's brigade. Brigadier-General S. R. Gist. Colonel P. H. Colquitt. Lieutenant-Colonel L. Napier. Forty-sixth Georgia, Colonel P. H. Colquitt and Major A. M. Speer. Eighth Georgia Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel L. Napier. Sixteenth South Carolina,( Not engaged; at Rome.) Colonel J. McCullough. TColonel P. H. Colquitt and Major A. M. Speer. Eighth Georgia Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel L. Napier. Sixteenth South Carolina,( Not engaged; at Rome.) Colonel J. McCullough. Twenty-fourth South Carolina, Colonel C. H. Stevens and Lieutenant-Colonel E. Capers. Wilsan's brigade. Colonel C. C. Wilson. Twenty-fifth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel A. J. Williams. Twenty-ninth Georgia, Lieutenant G. R. McRae. Thirtieth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel J. S. Boynton. First Georgia Battalion (S. S.),—— —— Fourth Louisiana Battalion,—— —— Ector's brigade. Brigadier-General M. D. Ector. Stone's Alabama Battalion. Pound's Mississippi Battalion. Twent
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, 1864. (search)
tion across the railroad, with his masses immediately in front of our right and resting upon the railroad. The commanding General, seeing the right was the weak point of the enemy, determined upon this as the point of attack. The brigades of Colquitt and Ransom were ordered relieved by an extension of my line to the right, which placed my division in line of battle, commencing at Fort Stephens, with Hagood's brigade on the left, Johnson's on his right, then Clingman, with Corse upon his right. These two brigades, under the command of General Colquitt, were held in reserve immediately in rear of Hagood's brigade. The division commanded by Major-General Ransom, being in the field on our extreme left, was to turn the right of the enemy and pivot upon his right and connect with my left, while I was to engage the enemy in front with strong lines of skirmishers, and also open upon them with all my artillery. At the earliest dawn I ordered my entire artillery to open and advanced the s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations around Petersburg-General Hagood's report of 16th, 17th and 18th of June, 1864. (search)
sent me by Colonel Harris, Chief of Engineers, I finally determined upon the line of the creek, which empties into the Appomattox in rear of No. 1, and the west fork of which crosses the lines near No. 15, and established my command upon it. General Colquitt's brigade and the other brigades arriving shortly afterwards were established upon this line, General Hoke having approved the selection, and by daylight the position was partially entrenched. Colonel Tabb's regiment of Wise's brigade held ted to rally, but were driven back in confusion. The Twenty first, Twenty-seventh and Eleventh regiments repulsed this attack. South of the City Point road the skirmishing was heavy, but our line was not attacked. Later in the afternoon, when Colquitt's brigade was assailed, my right regiment fired a few volleys obliquely upon the attacking column. Lieutenant Harvey, Seventh battalion, was killed to-day, and Lieutenant Felder, Twenty-fifth, and Major Rion, Seventh battalion, were wounded.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations in front of Petersburg June 24th, 1864. (search)
sely supported by Anderson's brigade. When we had succeeded in driving them from their first line, Anderson was to occupy it till his support arrived, when he was to press on against their second and third lines, while, pivoting my three regiments, already spoken of, on their right, and bringing up the other two regiments of the brigade, I was to form my line along the City Point road, perpendicular to my first position. Then, taking the enemy's first line as a directrix, I was to clear Colquitt's front (on my right) as far as and including Hare's Hill, &c., &c. While General Hoke was still explaining the plan of battle to me, Lieutenant Andrews reported to me from General Anderson, stating that the latter was in position, and had sent him to keep in communication with me. In consultation with General Hoke my plan of attack was settled and every preparation made. The artillery opened precisely at 7 A. M. and ceased precisely at 7.30 A. M. At 7.20 A. M. I sent Lieut. Andrews t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
etely invested Harpers Ferry. Lee, with Longstreet, was near Hagerstown, D. H. Hill at Boonsboroa, with the brigades of Colquitt and Garland in the pass through the South Mountain, known to history and the reports as Turner's Gap, Hampton and Munform to believe on the night of the 13th, that only two Federal brigades were advancing on the National road, so he ordered Colquitt and Garland back from Boonsboroa, three miles off, and put them in the pass. Early next morning he ordered up Anderson' brigade, together with which, it held the Federal left back during the remainder of the day. It killed Reno however. Colquitt was placed in the centre astride of the turnpike. Later, Ripley was sent to the right to support Anderson, and Rodes toarpsburg as the Bloody Lane. Rodes and Anderson were in the road, and with them, probably, some of the men from Ripley, Colquitt and Garland, who had been driven from the field. French came on in three lines, but was stopped by the Sunken Road, unt