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D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 8 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 6 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 6 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Colston or search for Colston in all documents.

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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 5 (search)
Wilcox's and A. P. Hill's brigades were sent to the assistance of the troops engaged, and, as the Federal force on the field continued to increase, Pickett's and Colston's brigades also reenforced ours. At noon the fighting was reported by Longstreet and Stuart to be so sharp, that D. H. Hill's division, which had marched seveground — the southeastern part of that in which Williamsburg stands. The contest was just leaving the wood and entering the open ground when I first saw it. Here Colston's brigade joined the Confederate, and Kearney's division the Federal troops engaged. But in the open ground the Confederates were more rapidly successful than inoon, being reinforced apparently, the Federals (several brigades) assumed the offensive, and attacked him. In the mean time General Hill had sent two regiments of Colston's brigade to him. Although largely outnumbered, Pickett met this attack with great resolution, and after a brisk but short action repulsed the enemy, who disappea