hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 85 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 39 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 23 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 12 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for R. E. Colston or search for R. E. Colston in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.58 (search)
Watching the Merrimac. R. E. Colston, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. In March, 1862, I was in command of a Confederate brigade and of a district on the south side of the James River, embracing all the river forts and batteries down to the mouth of Nansemond River. My pickets were posted all along the shore opposite Newport News. From my headquarters at Smithfield I was in constant and rapid communication through relays of couriers and signal stations with my department commander, Major-General Huger1 stationed at Norfolk. The situation of affairs, both Federal and State, at Norfolk, on the morning of the 19th of April, 1861], says J. T. Scharf in his History of the Confederate States Navy, was that the Federal authorities had there the U. S. frigate Cumberland, 24 guns, fully manned, ready for sea, and under orders for Vera Cruz; the brig Dolphin, 4 guns, fully manned, and ready for sea; the sloop Germantown, 22 guns, fully manned, ready for sea; the sloop Plymouth, 22 guns