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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
r the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years of the war, and which was afterwards repaid to it by the Commonwealth, is as follows: In 1861, $72.83; in 1862, $311.03; in 1863, $319.50; in 1864, $240.00; in 1865, $225.00. Total amount, $1,168.36. Pittsfield Incorporated April 21, 1761. Population in 1860, 8,045; in 1865, 9,679. Valuation in 1860, $5,059,907; in 1865, $6,378,878. The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were John C. West, Henry Colt, and Chauncey Goodrich. The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was James Warriner; in 1865, James M. Barker. The town-treasurer during all of these years was Josiah Carter. 1861. A large meeting of the citizens of Pittsfield was held on the 18th of April; at which a committee was appointed to aid the volunteers of the Pittsfield company, which had been ordered to join the Eighth Regiment at Springfield and proceed to Washington for a service of three months; and to make suit
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
ch Samuel Hawkes, William H. Newhall, George H. Sweetser, Josiah Starr, and Artemas Edmonds were chosen a committee to fix upon what compensation should be paid to citizens of the town when called into the military service, and for the support of their families while they are absent. Five thousand dollars were appropriated, subject to the order of the committee. If a sufficient number of citizens volunteer to form a military company, each member was to be furnished with a uniform and one of Colt's best revolvers; the cost not to exceed one thousand dollars. 1862. July 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who should enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town. Four thousand dollars were appropriated to pay bounties and expenses of recruiting. August 25th, On motion of Herbert B. Newhall, it was resolved, That the citizens of Saugus believe it their duty to furnish at any cost its quota of three hundred thousand nine-months men
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
Lamson, A. W. Andrews, David T. Moore. Voted, that the uniforms be of such style and material as the volunteers may select; that each volunteer be provided with a Colt's revolver and a bowie-knife; that each be paid one dollar a day by the town while in the United States service, and one dollar for every half day spent in drillinl, J. S. Montague, and Charles Fales were chosen to carry this vote into effect. The committee furnished forty-four uniforms, at a cost of $523.63; thirty-seven Colt's army revolvers at a cost of $536.56, and paid for drilling $289. Total, $1,349.19. 1862. July 2d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of thher neighboring towns, said volunteers to be equipped by the State and tendered to the Government on call; that we will furnish each with a suitable uniform and a Colt's revolver, and pay each one dollar a day while in active service, and fifty cents for every half-day spent in drilling. Two thousand dollars were appropriated