Your search returned 261 results in 42 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
tions. The opposition, recognizing this fact, in most cases acquiesced. At no time in the history of the Government have there been abler men in Congress than there were then. Among the senators were Sumner, Wade, Chandler, Morton, Fessenden, Conkling, Morgan, Sherman, Morrill, Voorhees, Trumbull, Anthony, and Wilson. In the House were Garfield, Colfax, Butler, Brooks, Bingham, Blaine, Shellabarger, Wilson, Allison, Cullom, Logan, Ames, Hooper, Washburne, Boutwell, Randall, and Voorhees. Su which they occupied temporarily. Therefore they extended a very cordial welcome to all who were entitled to be received. In both houses of Congress there were many of the most distinguished men of the nation. In the Senate Hamlin, Sumner, Conkling, Fenton, Fessenden, Frelinghuysen, Booth, McDougall, Simon Cameron, Chandler, Howard, Kellogg, Morrill of Vermont, Morrill of Maine, Wilson, Boutwell, Bayard, Morton, Williams of Oregon, Yates, Trumbull, and others, made it one of the ablest bod
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 10: (search)
of Iowa, then a member of the House, and one of the impeachment committee, was very strongly urged by President Grant to accept the position of Secretary of State. He even consented at one time to consider the matter favorably, but, subsequently learning that Mr. Washburne desired to name a number of the appointees to the diplomatic service, he reconsidered his promise and declined to have any connection with the cabinet, after which Mr. Fish was chosen at the request of Senator Morgan, Mr. Conkling, and other New York friends of President Grant. Had Mr. Wilson accepted this position, who can tell the effect upon the policy of the administration? Cuba might have been one of our strongest allies and a prosperous republic before the expiration of President Grant's second term. Upon reflection it will be remembered that very early in Grant's administration the Cuban question came up as one of the most important of the time. I recollect that many earnest and prolonged conferences
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 11: (search)
sensation by her magnificent dress and diamonds, represented the Diplomatic Corps. The ladies of the cabinet who were not assisting in the reception accompanied their husbands and sustained themselves admirably as representative American women. In the throng there were such distinguished persons as Gail Hamilton-Mrs. Blaine's cousin-Sydney Hyde, Mary Clemmer Ames, Miss Foote, John W. Forney, Ben Perley Poore, and many other representatives of literary circles, while Senators Fenton, Conkling, Chandler, Bayard, Morton, Ferry, Howard, Drake, Carpenter, Thurman, Edmunds, Frelinghuysen, Fessenden, William Pitt Kellogg, and hosts of others represented the Senate. Of the House, there was Wilson, of Iowa; Frye and Blaine, of Maine; Hawley, of Connecticut; Pomeroy, of Kansas; Farnsworth and Burchard, of Illinois, and many others whose names are associated with the stirring events of that era. To this brilliant galaxy were added our army, navy, and marine corps, all in the full-dre
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 12: (search)
tion of anything which he opposed. He used effectively weapons of sarcasm and ridicule. But he was no match for Senator Conkling in this line of debate. Schurz had dubbed Senator Conkling The Powter Pigeon of the Senate, but Conkling was probabSenator Conkling The Powter Pigeon of the Senate, but Conkling was probably the author of the cognomen Mephistopheles which had been conferred upon Schurz in virtue of his peculiar physiognomy. It is needless to add that Carl Schurz was not re-elected to the Senate from Missouri, but he was subsequently appointed SecretaConkling was probably the author of the cognomen Mephistopheles which had been conferred upon Schurz in virtue of his peculiar physiognomy. It is needless to add that Carl Schurz was not re-elected to the Senate from Missouri, but he was subsequently appointed Secretary of the Interior by Mr. Hayes. He was a very remarkable man, but could never quite get over his revolutionary ideas. He was wont to say that the Roman punch was the life-saving station in Mrs. Hayes's temperance dinners. Mrs. Schurz and her daug she had made a mistake, she said: Two born in America, and one in Japan. One is named Ulysses Grant, and one other Roscoe Conkling. They were hospitable entertainers, and when you went there to a dinner they had many favors at your plate, which w
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 13: (search)
rganized the Freedmen's Bureau investigation leaders of the Senate, Anthony, Conkling, Hamlin, Carpenter, Morton, Cameron, Sherman, Thurman, Gordon, Allison, and otevery question that might in any way lessen the influence of New England. Roscoe Conkling was probably the handsomest man in the Senate, and was most fastidious in great State of New York never had a more able or faithful senator than was Roscoe Conkling. He eschewed all social functions, as his family were rarely with him, anal for him to be reserved, but no more faithful friend could be found than Roscoe Conkling when he once allowed himself to become attached to a brother senator. In striking contrast to Senator Conkling was his colleague, Senator Fenton. He had a most genial disposition and agreeable manner. He had not the intellectual power of Conkling, but probably accomplished more through his diplomacy. He had a charming family, consisting of his wife and the Misses Fenton, who were very popular in
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 15: (search)
hields of Missouri; Daniel Voorhees of Indiana; Roscoe Conkling of New York; Platt of Connecticut; Hill of Colontense was the excitement before the holidays that Conkling, Cameron, and Logan were called The Triumvirate beduring the whole year of 1880. Early in April, Conkling, Cameron, Carpenter, Chandler, and other Republicamost to suffocation. As soon as quiet reigned, Roscoe Conkling arose in his place and began his speech with th-inspired utterances bring soulful responses. Senator Conkling's speech, though a literary and oratorical tricontrast in style and delivery to that of Senator Conkling, which was equally fruitless in its effect upon ths appointments. It was unfortunate that it took Mr. Conkling a long time to be reconciled to the nomination oOhio, when a desperate effort was made to induce Mr. Conkling to appear with General Grant, thus committing himself to the support of Garfield and Arthur. This Conkling could not be induced to do. General Grant delighte
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 16: (search)
d rupture between the administration and Senator Conkling assassination of the President admirablers. There was a particular desire to have Mr. Conkling return to the Republican fold that he migho help carry out the policy of that party. Mr. Conkling's prejudices were very strong when he was aences to bring about a sudden rupture between Conkling and Garfield was the imbroglio about the app This appointment was strenuously opposed by Conkling but his opposition was in vain. President Gapointment and Judge Robertson was confirmed. Conkling immediately left the Senate taking with him hr Howe, from Wisconsin, Postmaster-General. Mr. Conkling was tendered a seat on the Supreme Bench, boln, President Arthur, James G. Blaine, ex-Senator Conkling, General Grant, and Governor Foster, ofspite of the expressed will of the people. Mr. Conkling and other influential men in the party decling Voorhees, Thurman, Vice-President Arthur, Conkling, Cullom, Miller, and Slocum, depicts General [1 more...]
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 6: from Manassas to Leesburg. (search)
en the strongest man on the Harvard boat crew about the time I held the like prominent position among the boating men of Yale. In the account of the battle, given by one of the Northern papers, I noticed, with great interest and pleasure, that Crowninshield, rather than surrender, swam the river and made good his escape, after his right arm had been shattered by a Minie ball. It was really a plucky and splendid feat. Then, too, I very much enjoyed a newspaper report of a speech of Roscoe Conkling, delivered in the House of Representatives at Washington, upon this battle, in the course of which, extolling the valor of the Federal troops, he quoted from Tennyson's Charge of the light brigade the lines: Cannon to right of them, Cannon to left of them, Cannon in front of them, Volleyed and thundered. This was at once amusing and aggravating, as we had felt peculiarly chagrined at not being able to fire even. so much as one shot while the battle roared in the thicket in f
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
Mountain, Va., 186, 232 Cobb, Thomas Reade Rootes, 113, 138 Cold Harbor, 26, 238, 263, 270-309, 339, 347; Ellyson's barn at, 301 Columbia University, 32, 145 Combat conditions described, 104, 278-80, 282-83, 330-34. Committee on the Conduct of the War, 106, 126, 180, 211,219, 306 Conestoga horses, 200 Confederate enlisted men, tributes to, 19, 48-58, 358-68. Confederate Infantry: Naval Battalion, 329, 333 Confederate Museum, 357 Congressional Globe, 29 Conkling, Roscoe, 62 Connecticut Infantry; 27th Regiment, 174-75. Couch, Darius Nash, 165 Courts-martial, 351 Cowardice, 135, 274, 276-77. Crouch, Frederick William Nicholls, 49, 296 Crowninshield, Casper, 62 Culpeper Court House, Va., 73, 127, 192 Cumming, Alfred, 113 Currency, 63, 87-88. Custer, George Armstrong, 237 Dahlgren Raid, 236-37. Dame, William Meade, 240-44, 252- 53, 288-89. Daniel, John Warwick, 214 Davis, Henry Winter, 27 Davis, James Lucius, 82 Davis,
al Government within her limits to be suspended. Any other course would be madness; as it would at once enlist all the Southern States in the controversy, and plunge the whole country into a civil war. The first gun fired in the way of forcing a seceding State back to her allegiance to the Union, would probably prove the knell of its final dismemberment. As a matter of policy and wisdom, therefore, independent of the question of right, we should deem resort to force most disastrous. Mr. Roscoe Conkling attests that, when the proceedings of this Convention reached Washington, they were hailed with undisguised exultation by the Secessionists still lingering in the halls of Congress; one of whom said to him triumphantly, If your President should attempt coercion, he will have more opposition at the North than he can overcome. The New York Herald of November 9th--the third day after that of the Presidential election — in its leading editorial, had said: For far less than this [th
1 2 3 4 5