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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 2 0 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The Mexican war-the battle of Palo Alto-the battle of Resaca de la Palma-Army of invasion- General Taylor-movement on Camargo (search)
oubt, by the same vessel that carried it. This kept him out of the battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma. Either the resignation was not accepted, or General Worth withdrew it before action had been taken. At all events he returned to the army in time to command his division in the battle of Monterey, and served with it to the end of the war. The second occasion on which General Taylor was said to have donned his uniform, was in order to receive a visit from the Flag Officer [David Conner] of the naval squadron off the mouth of the Rio Grande. While the army was on that river the Flag Officer sent word that he would call on the General to pay his respects on a certain day. General Taylor, knowing that naval officers habitually wore all the uniform the law allowed on all occasions of ceremony, thought it would be only civil to receive his guest in the same style. His uniform was therefore got out, brushed up, and put on, in advance of the visit. The Flag Officer, knowing
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Conner, David 1792-1856 (search)
Conner, David 1792-1856 Naval officer; born in Harrisburg, Pa., about 1792; entered the navy in January, 1809, and as acting-lieutenant was in the action between the Hornet and Peacock. He was made a lieutenant in 1813, and remained on the Hornet. In her action with the Penguin, Conner was dangerously wounded, and for his brave conduct was presented with a medal by Congress, and by the legislature of Pennsylvania with a sword. He was promoted to the rank of commander in March, 1825, andConner was dangerously wounded, and for his brave conduct was presented with a medal by Congress, and by the legislature of Pennsylvania with a sword. He was promoted to the rank of commander in March, 1825, and to captain in 1835. During the war with Mexico (1846-48) he commanded the American squadron on the Mexican coast, and assisted in the reduction of the fortress of San Juan de Ulloa in the spring of 1847. He captured Tampico in November, 1846. His last service was in command of the Philadelphia navy-yard. He died in Philadelphia, March 20, 1856.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mexico, War with (search)
s in the Southwest, to go to Texas and take a position as near the Rio Grande as prudence would allow. This force, about 1,500 strong, was called the Army of Occupation for the defence of Texas. At the same time a strong naval force, under Commodore Conner, sailed to the Gulf of Mexico to protect American interests there. In September Taylor formed a camp at Corpus Christi, and there remained during the autumn and winter. He was ordered, Jan. 13, 1846, to move from his camp at Corpus Christies. The conquest of all northern Mexico was now complete, and General Scott was on his march for the capital. He had landed at Vera Cruz, March 9, with an army of 13,000 men. It had been borne thither by a powerful squadron, commanded by Commodore Conner. He invested the city of Vera Cruz (q. v.) on the 13th, and on the 27th it was surrendered with the castle of San Juan de Ulloa. Scott took possession of the city two days afterwards, and, on April 8, the advance of his army, under General
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Santa Ana, Antonio Lopez de 1798- (search)
ts and Centralists, taking part with the former, he was virtually dictator of Mexico from Oct. 10, 1841, to June 4, 1844, under the title of provisional President. He was constitutional President from June 4 to Sept. 20, 1844, when he was deposed by a new revolution, taken prisoner near Tlacolula, Jan. 15, 1845, and banished for ten years. He took up his residence in Cuba, where he secretly negotiated for the betrayal of his country to the United States. He was allowed to pass through Commodore Conner's fleet into Mexico, where he was appointed generalissimo of the army, and in December was again elected provisional President. With an army of 20,000 men he lost the battle of Buena Vista. He was afterwards defeated in battle at Cerro Gordo, and about the middle of September, 1847, was driven with nearly 2,000 followers from the city of Mexico. He was deposed, and in April, 1848, fled from the country to Jamaica, W. I. He returned to Mexico in 1853, where he was received with great
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tampico, (search)
Tampico, A seaport town of Mexico, in the State of Tamaulipas, on the Panuco River, 5 miles from the Gulf of Mexico; was taken possession of by the fleet of Commodore Conner, Nov. 14, 1846, in the early part of the war with Mexico.