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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Virginia division of Army of Northern Virginia, at their reunion on the evening of October 21, 1886. (search)
Carolina, and South Carolina cheered the Old Dominion. This was the account of the arrival of the First South Carolina Volunteers under Colonel Gregg, accompanied by General Bonham and his staff. Three days after, the Second South Carolina Volunteers, under Colonel J. B. Kershaw, arrived, and South Carolina had furnished the first organized brigade in Virginia. A brigade which, with some changes, became the First Brigade of the Army of the Potomac, and continued under Bonham, Kershaw, Conner, and Kennedy, a brigade throughout the war. A correspondent of the Charleston Mercury, who accompanied the first South Carolina Volunteers, writing on the 26th April, thus describes the appearance of Richmond on the arrival of this regiment: We reached Richmond on an auspicious day. The ordinance by which Virginia became a member of the Southern Confederacy had been adopted by the Convention in secret session and just made public. The people were wild with delight at the wished for c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 21 (search)
veneration are blooming above his peaceful grave. On the 12th of January last another of our companions-Captain DeRosset Lamar—was taken from us. He was an aide-de-camp at first to Brigadier-General Robert Toombs, then to Major-General William H. T. Walker, and lastly to Brigadier-General Alfred Cumming. When General Cumming was wounded, Captain Lamar was assigned to duty with Colonel Roman as an Assistant Inspector-General. Then, on the 15th of February, after a long illness, Private Eugene Conner, of the Washington Artillery, found friendly sepulture in our Confederate section. And, on the 18th of last month, Private William Teppe, of Company D, Fifth regiment, South Carolina cavalry, Butler's division, Hampton's corps, Army of Northern Virginia, responded to the trump which summoned him to the bivouac of the dead. Alas! the circle of our fraternity is narrowing. It will grow rapidly smaller as the years roll on; and soon, aye, very soon, so far at least as we are conc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign of 1864 and 1865. (search)
se brigades they were, but one I know was Harris's Mississippi brigade, one was Girardy's Georgia, one was Virginia, two were North Carolina, one commanded by General Conner, one Wright's, and the other I do not recollect. I should add that W. H. F. Lee's division of cavalry had also reported to me, and covered my left on the Chald be rallied (a majority of the North Carolina fighting well, its Colonel commanding being badly wounded) and that portion of the army which had been cut off—Colonel Conner, afterwards General Conner, being the senior, and in command of it, attacking at the same time in flank. This ended the fighting for that day. Our losses,General Conner, being the senior, and in command of it, attacking at the same time in flank. This ended the fighting for that day. Our losses, as might be inferred from such open, hard fighting, were heavy—the enemy's, though, much more so. Among the casualties in my division which now, at this distance of time, recur to me were: Colonel Little, commanding Eleventh Georgia, wounded; Colonel Jack Brown, of Georgia, my aide-de-camp, Lieutenant W. Roy Mason, badly wounded,