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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Joseph Conrad or search for Joseph Conrad in all documents.

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gment recalled me before actual contact could take place. Of course Terrill reported me for this, and my ire was so inflamed by his action that when we next met I attacked him, and a fisticuff engagement in front of barracks followed, which was stopped by an officer appearing on the scene. Each of us handed in an explanation, but mine was unsatisfactory to the authorities, for I had to admit that I was the assaulting party, and the result was that I was suspended by the Secretary of War, Mr. Conrad, till August 28, 1852--the Superintendent of the Academy, Captain Brewerton, being induced to recommend this milder course, he said, by my previous good conduct. At the time I thought, of course, my suspension a very unfair punishment, that my conduct was justifiable and the authorities of the Academy all wrong, but riper experience has led me to a different conclusion, and as I look back, though the mortification I then endured was deep and trying, I am convinced that it was hardly as mu
nnoissance, so to speak, for that was the real nature of these excursions-and on one occasion the colonel in command, Colonel Conrad, of the Fifteenth Missouri, informed me that he got through without much difficulty; in fact, that everything had gonhis time it appeared to be known only to each other. The story was straight and the circumstance clear, so, convinced of Conrad's continued sanity, I directed the provost-marshal to bring in arrest to my headquarters the two disturbers of Conrad's pConrad's peace of mind. After some little search the East Tennessee woman was found in camp, somewhat the worse for the experiences of the day before, but awaiting her fate contentedly smoking a cob-pipe. She was brought to me, and put in duress under chargm B. McCreery. Second brigade: Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri, Major Arnold Beck. Fifteenth Missouri, Colonel Joseph Conrad. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Colonel Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel William A. Presson
The manoeuvres by which Rosecrans had carried his army over the Cumberland Mountains, crossed the Tennessee River, and possessed himself of Chattanooga, merit the highest commendation up to the abandonment of this town by Bragg on the 8th of September; but I have Second brigade: Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, Colonel James F. Jaquess. Second Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel Arnold Beck. Fifteenth Missouri, Colonel Joseph Conrad. First Missouri Light Artillery, Battery G. Captain Henry Hescock, chief of division artillery. Lieutenant Gustavas Schueler. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Luther P. Bradley. (2) Colonel Nathan H. Walworth. Twenty-Second Ilinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Seventh illinois, Colonel Jonathan R. Miles. Forty-Second Illinois (1), Colonel Nathan H. Walworth. Forty-Second Illinois (2), Lieutenant-Colonel John A. Hottenstien. Fifty-First Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Samue
Demi-Brigade, Colonel Silas Miller. Second Demi-Brigade, Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel Arnold Beck. Fifteenth Missouri (1), Colonel Joseph Conrad. Fifteenth Missouri (2), Captain Samuel Rexinger. Twenty-second Indiana, Colonel Michael Gooding. Thirty-sixth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Porter C. Olsonand a battery located there opened fire along the crest, making things most uncomfortably hot. Seeing the danger to which I was exposed, for I was mounted, Colonel Joseph Conrad, of the Fifteenth Missouri, ran up and begged me to dismount. I accepted his excellent advice, and it probably saved my life, but poor Conrad was punishedConrad was punished for his solicitude by being seriously wounded in the thigh at the moment he was thus contributing to my safety. Wildly cheering, the men advanced along the ridge toward Bragg's headquarters, and soon drove the Confederates from this last position, capturing a number of prisoners, among them Breckenridge's and Bates's adjutant