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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
n, Capt. W. M. Smith; 5th Tenn., Col. G. W. McKenzie; 9th Tenn., Maj. J. H. Akin, Capt. J. W. Greene, Maj. J. H. Akin. Harrison's Brigade, Col. Thomas Harrison: 3d Ark., Col. A. W. Hobson; 4th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. P. F. Anderson; 8th Tex., Lieut.-Col. Gustave Cook, Maj. S. P. Christian, Lieut.-Col. Gustave Cook; 11th Tex., Col. G. R. Reeves. Grigsby's (or Williams's) Brigade, Col. J. Warren Grigsby, Brig.-Gen. John S. Williams: 1st Ky., Col. J. R. Butler, Lieut.-Col. J. W. Griffith, Col. J. R. ButLieut.-Col. Gustave Cook; 11th Tex., Col. G. R. Reeves. Grigsby's (or Williams's) Brigade, Col. J. Warren Grigsby, Brig.-Gen. John S. Williams: 1st Ky., Col. J. R. Butler, Lieut.-Col. J. W. Griffith, Col. J. R. Butler; 2d Ky., Maj. T. W. Lewis; 9th Ky., Col. W. C. P. Breckinridge; 2d Ky. Batt'n, Capt. J. B. Dortch; Allison's Squadron, Capt. J. H. Allison; Hamilton's Batt'n, Maj. Jo. Shaw. Roddey's command, Brig.-Gen. P. D. Roddey. (The only mention of Roddey in the reports of this time speaks of his having 600 men.) artillery, Lieut.-Col. Felix H. Robertson, Maj. James Hamilton: Ark. Battery, Lieut. J. P. Bryant, Lieut. J. W. Callaway; Ga. Battery (Ferrell's, one section), Lieut. W. B. S. Davis; Te
er Gen. J. E. Johnston in 1864 were General Granbury's brigade, including the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Texas, Capt. R. Fisher and Capt. B. R. Tyus; Seventh Texas, Captain Collet and Capt. O. B. Forrest; Tenth Texas, Col. R. Q. Mills, Lieut.-Col. R. B. Young, Col. C. R. Earp; Seventeenth and Eighteenth Texas, Capt. D. G. Manion and Capt. F. L. Knight; Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Texas, Col. F. C. Wilkes and Capt. J. F. Mathews. Col. Thos. Harrison's brigade, composed of the Eighth Texas, Col. G. Cook; Eleventh Texas, Col. G. R. Reeves; Douglas' battery, Lieut. J. H. Bingham, Lieut. Ben Hardin; and Gen. L. S. Ross' cavalry brigade. Hynson's battery, Capt. H. C. Hynson, was with General Marmaduke in the Missouri expedition under General Price, after his return to the Trans-Mississippi department. The services of the Texas troops in Louisiana and Arkansas in the years 1863 and 1864 were as follows: Early in the spring of 1863 Sibley's brigade was ordered to Louisiana, and with Lou
or's brigade, including the Ninth infantry, Colonel Young, and Tenth, Fourteenth and Thirty-second cavalry, dismounted, under Cols. C. R. Earp, J. L. Camp, and Julius A. Andrews. The Seventh Texas, under Granbury, was in Gregg's brigade, Bushrod Johnson's division. Jerome B. Robertson's brigade, Hood's division, Longstreet's corps, from Virginia, included the Third Arkansas; First Texas, Capt. R. J. Harding; Fourth, Col. John P. Bane; Fifth, Maj. C. J. Rogers. The Eighth cavalry, Lieut.-Col. Gustave Cook; Eleventh, Col. G. R. Reeves, formed part of the brigade of Col. Thomas Harrison, in Gen. John A. Wharton's division, Wheeler's cavalry corps. It will be remembered that on the morning of the first day Forrest's cavalry, supported by Colonel Wilson's Georgia brigade and Ector's brigade (mainly Texans) opened the battle, gallantly contesting the Federal advance on the Confederate right. In his report, General Walker said, General Ector is absent, his brigade having been ordered
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
through we hurry on to Jackson. But Vicksburg falls 'ere we can cross the Big Black, and Sherman tries to intercept, but strikes us only in our works at Jackson. Four stands of colors lie amid a thousand killed and wounded before the muzzles of Cook's and Slocomb's guns. Bragg calls in turn and Breckinridge is sent. The Fifth is pushed to Rome and Chattanooga. The echoes of the first guns salute them as they reach there. We strike at Glass's Mill, and plunging through the Chickamauga, lle flag of the Fifth Texas, with its 56 bullet holes through it, and General Lee brought down the house by his eloquent allusion to it. General Lee, the dashing cavalryman of the Army of Northern Virginia, was appropriately introduced by Judge Gustave Cook, the gallant Colonel of the Texas Rangers, who in few but well-chosen words presented to the audience the soldier-orator of Virginia. Nowhere has General Lee's lecture excited more appreciative or enthusiastic applause. Then followed a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
raise that soldiers could expect; and Anthony and Reid are left to mark its passage. Vicksburg is sore beset, and Johnston calls and Breckinridge is going, and the Fifth Company asks to follow. Mobile, in passing, gives us new recruits, as rushing through we hurry on to Jackson. But Vicksburg falls 'ere we can cross the Big Black, and Sherman tries to intercept, but strikes us only in our works at Jackson. Four stands of colors lie amid a thousand killed and wounded before the muzzles of Cook's and Slocomb's guns. Bragg calls in turn and Breckinridge is sent. The Fifth is pushed to Rome and Chattanooga. The echoes of the first guns salute them as they reach there. We strike at Glass's Mill, and plunging through the Chickamauga, leave on its banks a holocaust of dead. 'Tis Blair meeting a fate he had just predicted, and Morel, and Anderson, and Belsom, and Bailey and Daigle! We laid them shrouded in their blankets, and move to strike elsewhere. Morning finds us on the ri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
gain at our earliest opportunity. The General was escorted to Gray's Opera-House by the Houston Light Guard and the committees, and was greeted there by a large and enthusiastic audience. Among the flags which decorated the stage was the old battle flag of the Fifth Texas, with its 56 bullet holes through it, and General Lee brought down the house by his eloquent allusion to it. General Lee, the dashing cavalryman of the Army of Northern Virginia, was appropriately introduced by Judge Gustave Cook, the gallant Colonel of the Texas Rangers, who in few but well-chosen words presented to the audience the soldier-orator of Virginia. Nowhere has General Lee's lecture excited more appreciative or enthusiastic applause. Then followed a magnificent banquet in the beautiful dining-hall of the Capitol Hotel, which was presided over by Hon. J. C. Hutcheson, and at which there were a number of good speeches in response to appropriate toasts. General George D. Johnston, our able and
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
ner, the other of infantry under Mower—which were at Corinth start toward the north-west to bar the passage to Forrest as soon as Smith's manoeuvre shall have determined his retreat. Colonel Prince, with several regiments of cavalry, has posted himself to the northward of the Memphis and Corinth Railway to cover the approaches thereto. He has established his headquarters at Sommerville, and pushes his outposts as far as the left bank of the Hatchie. Thomas gave on the 20th the order to General Cook, who commanded the second cavalry division of the Army of the Cumberland, to quit Huntsville with his two brigades, leaving the care of guarding the railways to Sherman's troops, and to move rapidly toward the north-west, via Prospect on the Elk River, to head off Forrest if he should cross the Tennessee River. The time has come for the latter quickly to return to the State of Mississippi. He has collected nearly four thousand men, well mounted, but badly armed and little inured to w
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the Editor. (search)
d GeorgiaLieut.-col. R. Thompson. 4th GeorgiaCol. I. W. Avery. Second Brigade. Col. Thomas Harrison. 3d ConfederateCol. W. N. Estes. 1st [3d] KentuckyCol. J. R. Butler. 4th [8th] TennesseeLieut.-col. P. F. Anderson. 8th TexasLieut.-col. G. Cook. 11th TexasLieut.-col. J. M. Bounds. Artillery. Tennessee Battery Capt. B. F. White, Jr. Martin's division. Brig.-gen. Will. T. Martin. First Brigade. Col. James Hagan. 1st AlabamaMaj. A. H. Johnson. 3d Alabamouisiana Battalion Sharpshooters)Maj. J. E. Austin. 4th Louisiana BattalionMaj. S. L. Bishop. Joseph Wheeler's cavalry corps. John A. Wharton's division. First Brigade. 3d ArkansasLieut.-col. M. J. Henderson. 8th TexasLieut.-col. Gustave Cook. 11th TexasLieut.-col. J. M. Bounds. 65th North Carolina [6th Cavalry]Col. G. N. Folk. Second Brigade. 1st TennesseeCol. J. T. Wheeler. Col. James E. Carter. 2d TennesseeCol. H. M. Ashby. 4th TennesseeCol.— 11th Tennessee