hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 13, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John H. Cook or search for John H. Cook in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Personal reminiscences of the last days of Lee and his Paladins. (search)
ried large pieces of meat, sides of middling, such as that I had just drawn at the last issue of rations to the Army of Northern Virginia, but we had no time for conversation with them. General Long crossed the river about that time, and knowing him very well, we crossed with him, and rode with him a short distance. In less time than an hour, I suppose, the army, prisoners and all, had passed over, and General Lee had given orders to burn the bridge behind us, which I think was done by Major Cook, one of his Inspectors, a gentleman who, after the war, became an Episcopal minister, and who had charge of a colored church in this place for many years. On the hills beyond Farmville, there seemed to be a great deal of artillery halted, or parked, as I afterwards learned, and it was here (we know now, that which few knew then), that General Lee opened his first correspondence with Grant in reference to the surrender of the army; and it was a short distance further on that they seemed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The correspondence of Gen. Robt. E. Lee. (search)
er with as many as can be drawn from the army of General Beauregard at Culpeper C. H., under the command of that officer. It should never be forgotten that our concentration at any point, compels that of the enemy, and his numbers being limited, tends to relieve all other threatened localities. Page 946.Abstract from the Department of North Carolina, Major General D. H. Hill Commanding, Headquarters near Richmond, Virginia, June 30th, 1863. Permanent force: Clingman's Brigade, Cook's Brigade,Officers, 1,308. Martin's Brigade, Colquitt's Brigade,Aggregate present, 22,822. Jenkins' Brigade. Ransom's Brigade, Unattached Infantry,Pieces of Field artillery, 104. Artillery, Cavalry. Major-General Elsey's command. Wise's Brigade. Corse's Brigade, of Pickett's Division.Numbers not given. Local troops. Mr. Davis' letter to General Lee, June 28, 1863. Giving reasons why he could not send General Beauregard to Culpeper C. H., or any troops to Culpeper C.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
tysburg; William H. Bailey; Dr. J. W. Brooks, G. W. Barksdale; W. G. Baldwin, lieutenant, died in service;——Brown; Jim Bailey; John Barksdale. Wiltshire Cardwell, disabled in first battle of Manassas; George George Chappell; C. C. Chappell; John H. Cook, died in service; M. L. Covington, second lieutenant and then captain, wounded at ——; James A. Calhoun; John Calhoun, wounded at Gettysburg; James T. Crawley, wounded at Gettysburg; J. J. Cook, wounded at Gaines' Mill; Thomas Carter; W. J. Chappell, killed at Drewry's Bluff; J. H. Cook; Thomas Cumby; Joseph Covington; George Covington, wounded at New Berne, N. C.; Shanghai Coleman, orderly (Louisiana Tiger); —— ——Childress, fifer of company. E. B. Davis; Winslow Dennis; Patrick H. Deanor; James Dickerson, wounded at Gaines' Mill; Robert Davis; R. P. Davis; Temple Davis, killed at Gettysburg; Francis Dean; Joseph W. Dickerson; ——--—— Dougherty, killed at Five Forks (Louisiana Tiger). E. P. Evans; P. L. Evans; Thom