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of skirmishers. These two squadrons promptly charged the enemy and drove him back. The enemy soon rallied and charged again; but Major Russell had his men well in hand, and met the enemy the second time and drove him back again, capturing one officer and one private. The enemy was satisfied with charging. All this time the rebels had four batteries playing at cross-fires upon the Unionists, and yet, strange to say, the only casualties in the regiment of First Maryland cavalry are Captain Joseph Cook, company D, slightly wounded; Corporal Jno. McCowhen, company G, killed; private John Otto, company F, wounded; private John Schmits, company A, wounded, and three privates missing. Never did men charge more gallantly, or behave better than did these sqadrons. They met more than double their number, and twice drove them back and held the field. Lieutenant Bankard, company A, distinguished himself by his cool and gallant conduct. The following circular was issued this day from
ide of the mountain at the left, the rebels again produced their pieces at the right of the Gap. Cook's Massachusetts battery of six pieces was now brought up to the support of Robertson's, and a conh their staffs, rode upon the field, where they remained during the continuance of the battle. Cook's battery took a favorable position for shelling the woods in advance of the division, but had han; Thomas Gallaway, first handspike man; John Farrell, second handspike man; McKenny, powder-man; Cook, First Captain; Griffin, Second Captain; Captain McGrath, who stood by directing the fire, was thght artillery was advanced to cover the movement; McMullin's, Durell's, Clark's, Muhlenberg's and Cook's batteries being placed on the heights to right and left, and somewhat to the front of Benjamin' the left of Gen. Wilcox. The advance was partly covered by Simmons's, Muhlenberg's, Clark's and Cook's batteries, the other batteries of the corps being in part out of ammunition, and part being kep
the Gap. A half an hour later all of the enemy's guns were silent, but upon the moving of Cox's division soon after to the edge of the woods on the side of the mountain at the left, the rebels again produced their pieces at the right of the Gap. Cook's Massachusetts battery of six pieces was now brought up to the support of Robertson's, and a concentrating fire was poured into the Gap, many of the shells bursting directly over the rebel guns. At first the enemy threw solid shot, but after a woods, and a few minutes later had entered for the purpose of getting round the enemy's right. At this juncture Generals McClellan and Burnside, with their staffs, rode upon the field, where they remained during the continuance of the battle. Cook's battery took a favorable position for shelling the woods in advance of the division, but had hardly got to work when the rebels fired a tremendous volley of musketry at the cannoneers. This was repeated several times in quick succession, until
ented. One lived for several moments, but died as we were lifting him into an ambulance. The men who were manning the gun at the time of the accident were as follows: Gough, first sponger and loader, killed; Flanagan, first sponger, killed; M. Kennedy, first shotman; Haney, first assistant sponger; Gorman, first train tackle man; Cunningham, first train tackle-man; Acaney, second train tackle-man; Thomas Gallaway, first handspike man; John Farrell, second handspike man; McKenny, powder-man; Cook, First Captain; Griffin, Second Captain; Captain McGrath, who stood by directing the fire, was thrown to the ground, and at first supposed to be killed. He soon recovered. While several members of company K, First Maryland, were taking breakfast, after the first repulse of the enemy, five different balls struck the table. W. Henior, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New-York, had his hat shot off; Gordon Williams, of the Thirty-second Ohio, had his right lock of hair shot away. A rebe
it by assault. The command was moved forward in columns as it had been formed the previous night, and promptly took position as directed, and the light artillery was advanced to cover the movement; McMullin's, Durell's, Clark's, Muhlenberg's and Cook's batteries being placed on the heights to right and left, and somewhat to the front of Benjamin's battery, to which a section of twenty-pounders from Simmons's battery was also temporarily attached. Wilcox's division was also brought up and heldto move in the same direction, first dislodging the enemy from his front, and then changing direction to his right, bringing his command in echelon on the left of Gen. Wilcox. The advance was partly covered by Simmons's, Muhlenberg's, Clark's and Cook's batteries, the other batteries of the corps being in part out of ammunition, and part being kept necessarily in position on the commanding ground on the left bank of the stream. The troops moved forward in perfect order, and with great enthus
left about two hundred yards. I then filed the regiment to the left about battalion distance, where I was met by Gen. Rousseau. He ordered me to move to the front to support a battery, which I promptly did. I must here mention that company A, Captain Cook, and company F, Captain Clark, by order of Colonel Webster, from the first were left to the immediate support of the Nineteenth Indiana battery, and remained in that position, under the command of Capt. Cook, during a continuous and heavy fireCapt. Cook, during a continuous and heavy fire of musketry, which was as effectually returned until the moving to the rear of the battery, when the two companies moved off, supporting the battery in perfect order. The officers and men under my command behaved coolly and bravely through the entire engagement. It would be injustice to make any distinction. Captain Carr, of company D, fell in the charge while boldly leading his men on. Captain Carter, of company I, fell as gloriously, with his face to the foe, as a soldier should. Lieut. K
find the enemy. Major James M. Deems was sent with three companies eight miles towards Sperryville, as far as Devil's Run, but no enemy in force was found. A few bushwhackers were seen, and three of them taken prisoners. The Major returned to town at sundown, when he was again ordered, and with six companies, namely, company L, Capt. Thistleton; company I, Captain Charles Russell; company H, Captain Grafflin; company B, Capt. John Hancock; company D, Lieut. Marsdorf, and company E, Lieut. Joseph Cook. The order was to proceed at once to Rapidan station, and burn the large railroad bridge over the Rapidan River. Six miles from Fairfax the command was fired upon by the enemy, when a brisk skirmish for ten miles in succession took place, the enemy being driven rapidly before us. On the arrival at the railroad bridge, where the enemy's guards were stationed, a sharp encounter took place, in which a secesh Lieutenant by the name of Maxwell was killed. Lieut. Maxwell was from the Distr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cook, Joseph 1838- (search)
Cook, Joseph 1838- Lecturer; born in Ticonderoga, N. Y., Jan. 26, 1838; graduated at Harvard College in 1865; studied theology but never settled as a pastor; travelled in Europe and northern Africa in 1871-73; and returning to the United States became a lecturer of national repute on such topics as religion, science, and current reform. In 1895 broken health compelled him to relinquish public work. His lectures relating to the United States include Ultimate America; England and America as competitors and allies; Political signs of the times, etc. He died in Ticonderoga, N. Y., June 24, 1901.
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, The close of the War (search)
id and serious. He asked a blessing on the American people; on all those who had suffered from the war; on the government of the United States; and on our defeated enemies. When the short service had ended, Doctor Hill came forward and said: It is not fitting that any college tasks or exercises should take place until another sun has arisen after this glorious morning. Let us all celebrate this fortunate event. On leaving the chapel we found that Flavius Josephus Cook, afterwards Rev. Joseph Cook of the Monday Lectureship, had collected the members of the Christian Brethren about him, and they were all singing a hymn of thanksgiving in a very vigorous manner. There were some, however, who recollected on their way to breakfast the sad procession that had passed through the college-yard six months before,--the military funeral of James Russell Lowell's nephews, killed in General Sheridan's victory at Cedar Run. There were no recent graduates of Harvard more universally beloved
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
43. Population in 1860, 1,105; in 1865, 591. Valuation in 1860, $550,780; in 1865, $463,558. The selectmen in 1861 were Samuel Porter, William Moulton, John Gentlee; in 1862, Samuel Porter, John Gentlee, Solomon E. Kimball; in 1863, Rufus A. Dodge, Francis M. Dodge, Solomon E. Kimball; in 1864, Rufus A. Dodge, John Gentlee, Solomon E. Kimball; in 1865, Rufus A. Dodge, Francis M. Dodge, William B. Morgan. The town-clerk in 1861 was Benjamin C. Putnam; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Joseph Cook. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Stephen Dodge; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Amos Gould. 1861. At a legal town-meeting held on the 7th of May, one thousand dollars were appropriated to aid the families of citizens who have enlisted, or may enlist, in the service of their country in the present war. The selectmen, together with Amos F. Hobbs and Amos Gould, were appointed to visit the families and appropriate the money as in their judgment it is needed. In addition to the appropr
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