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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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eneral Doles (now commanding Ripley's brigade) pays a tribute to the memory of Major Robert S. Smith, Fourth Georgia, and speaks in the most complimentary terms of Colonel De Rosset, and Major Thurston, Third North Carolina, (the former severely, and the latter slightly, wounded,) and Captains Meares, McNair, and Williams, of the same regiment. Lieutenant-Colonel H. A. Brown, and Captain J. A. Hannell, acting Major of the First North Carolina regiment, are also highly commended. Lieutenant-Colonel Phil Cook, Captains Willis, De Graffenreid, and Lieutenants Hawkens, Bisel, Hulbert, Gay, (wounded,) Stephens, Exell, Snead, Cobb, (killed,) Macon, (severely wounded,) all commended themselves to my special notice by their gallant and meritorious conduct. Captain Rey, commanding Forty-fourth Georgia, and Captain Reid, Assistant Adjutant-General, are equally commended. Assistant Surgeon William P. Young remained on the field after he was wounded, caring for the wounded, and fell into the h
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
to 9 o'clock and many gallant men lost their lives. Among the killed were Capt. R. M. Bisel, Fourth Georgia; Capts. G. G. Green and H. M. Credille, and Lieut. A. M. Burnside, acting adjutant Forty-fourth, and Capt. U. A. Allen, Twenty-first. Col. Phil Cook was severely, and Capt. A. C. Watkins, Twenty-first, mortally, wounded. The brigade captured many prisoners on Sunday and continued skirmishing for three days afterward. Colonel Cook and Lieut.-Col. David R. E. Winn, Fourth; Colonel Willis Colonel Cook and Lieut.-Col. David R. E. Winn, Fourth; Colonel Willis and Maj. Isaac Hardeman, Twelfth; Lieutenant-Colonel Lumpkin, Forty-fourth; and Colonel Mercer and Maj. T. C. Glover, Twenty-first, were especially commended for gallantry. The brigade went into action with 126 officers and 1,468 enlisted men, and lost 66 killed, 343 wounded and 28 missing. Colquitt's brigade was delayed in getting into the fight by a demonstration of Federal cavalry in flank, but reached the field in time to support Doles. Sunday morning it was sent from flank to flank, fi
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
ivisions of this corps. His old brigade was now commanded by Brig.-Gen. Clement A. Evans. It embraced the Thirteenth, Twenty-sixth, Thirty-first, Thirty-eighth, Sixtieth and Sixty-first Georgia regiments and the Twelfth Georgia battalion. In Phil Cook's brigade of Rodes' division were the Fourth, Twelfth, Twenty-first and Forty-fourth Georgia regiments. Hastening to Lynchburg, Early chased Hunter for more than sixty miles, capturing prisoners and artillery. Then Early moved rapidly northwaand. Phillips' legion; in Bryan's brigade, commanded by Col. James P. Simms, the Tenth Georgia, Col. W. C. Holt; Fiftieth Georgia, Col. P. McGlashan; Fifty-first Georgia, Col. E. Ball, and the Fifty-third Georgia. The division which included Gen. Phil Cook's. brigade was now commanded by General Ramseur, General Rodes having been killed at Winchester. At early dawn of October 19th, the divisions of Gordon, Ramseur and Pegram, under the command of Gordon, attacked the Federal rear; while Kers
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
e possible, I will ask your readers to consider what was said about this controverted question by the witness best qualified to know—General Bryan Grimes—who planned and commanded the last charge at Appomattox. I enclose, therefore, the following extract from Grimes's own report, or statement, published in 1879, and never questioned before his death. As stated by him, he was given by General Gordon the divisions of Walker and Evans in addition to his own division, which was composed of Phil Cook's Georgia brigade, Battle's Alabama brigade, Grimes's old brigade, and Cox's brigade. It is proper to state that General Grimes was not in the rear, but was with the line of battle and narrowly escaped being killed. All soldiers know how hard it is for an unmounted officer at one end of a long line of battle to know what is done at the other. Hence, it does not disparage Captain Kaigler's veracity or courage to assert that he, who was on the extreme left, could not know what was done