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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
vernor), and other rebel chiefs, were yet active and mischievous. Early in January, 1863, Marmaduke, with about four thousand men, mostly mounted, burst suddenly out of Northern Arkansas, and fell upon Springfield, in Missouri, then fairly fortified by five earth-works, and defended by a small force, under General E. B. Brown, of the Missouri militia. His force consisted of about 1,200 State militia, the One Hundred and Eighteenth and One Hundred and Fifty-sixth Iowa, under Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Cook, and 800 convalescents, who re-enforced the garrison lust as Marmaduke was approaching. The attack was sharp and heavy, but General Brown gallantly fought the assailants with his little band from ten o'clock in the morning until dark, when Marmaduke withdrew, with a loss of two hundred men, and a gain of one cannon, which he carried away. In this engagement Springfield suffered much. Houses were riddled and set on fire by the shells. One exploded in a room occupied by four w
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 14: battle and capture of Fort Henry by the Navy. (search)
er; James McB. Stembel, Master's Mate; Philip Shell, Master's Mate; John R. Hall, U. S. N., Acting Gunner; Thomas B. Gregory, Carpenter; Jacob Vitinger, Armorer. Gun-boat Conestoga. S. L. Phelps, U. S. N., Lieutenant Commanding; John A. Duble. First Master; Charles P. Noble, Second Master; Benjamin Sebastian, Third Master; Richard H. Cutter, Fourth Master; Aaron M. Jordan. Pilot; William Attenborough, Pilot; William H. Wilson, Assistant Surgeon; Alfred Phelps, Acting Paymaster; Thomas Cook, Chief Engineer; Alexander Magee, First Assistant Engineer; Charles Marshall, Second Assistant Engineer; Michael Norton, Third Assistant Engineer; James Kearney, Master's Mate: Henry Hamilton, U. S. N., Acting Gunner; Andrew Woodlock, Carpenter; James O'Neil, Armorer. Gun-boat Essex William D. Porter, Iron-clad gun-boats St. Louis, Carondelet and Essex. U. S. N., Commander; Robert K. Riley, First Master; James Laning, Second Master; Theodore P. Ferry, Third Master; George
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
vis and J. M. Meacham; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Thomas Hebron; Acting-Assistants, J. L. Smith, J. S. Wilcoxen and Geo. Britton. Steamer Conestoga. Lieutenant-Commander, Thomas O. Selfridge; Assistant-Surgeon, J. Otis Burt; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. D. Ellsley; Acting-Master, George Hentig; Acting-Ensigns, Benj. Sebastian, James Kearney, Charles Pease and John Swaney; Acting-Master's Mates, S. J. Dewight, Henry Haskins, Thomas Devine and J. C. Petterson; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Thomas Cook, Alex. McGee, Michael Norton, James O'Neil and Andrew Lusk; Acting-Gunner, Gilbert Morton; Acting-Carpenter, J. J. Hays. Steamer Fairplay. Lieutenant-Commander, Le Roy Fitch; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, S. D. Bolton; Acting-Master, Geo. J. Groves; Acting-Ensigns, J. C. Coyle and Thad. Conant; Acting-Master's Mates, W. C. Coulson, John Reville and Isaac Summons; Acting-Engineers, Robert Mahatha, G. S. Collins, Chas. Egster and Wm. Bell; Acting-Carpenter, Thomas Manning. Steamer Ta
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
Acting-Second-Assistant; Joseph Blake; Acting Third-Assistants, S. C. Babbitt and E. H. Austin; Acting-Gunner, Reuben Applegate; Acting-Carpenter, John A. Stewart. Iron-clad steamer Conestoga. Lieutenant-Commander, Thomas O. Selfridge; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, S. L. Adams; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. D. Ilsley; Acting-Master, Gilbert Morton; Acting-Ensigns, Thomas Devine, S. J. Dwight, J. C. Peterson and Wm. Neil; Acting-Master's Mate, Alanson Hamilton; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Thomas Cook; Acting-First-Assistant, Alex. Magee; Acting-Second-Assistant, Chas. Fistadt; Acting-Third-Assistants, James O'Neil and Andrew Lusk; Acting-Carpenter, John J. Hays. Steamer Moose. Lieutenant-Commander, LeRoy Fitch; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. W. Clarke; Acting-Ensigns Edward Morgan, John Revall and J. H. Rice; Acting-Master's Mates, J. M. Tucker, C. H. Stout and C. W. Spooner; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, T. N. Hall; Acting-Second-Assistant, Charles McMillan. Steamer Tay
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
hilip Sheridan; Acting-Third-Assistants, Walter Mossington and S. H. Lancaster; Acting-Carpenter, J. M. Peabody. Vindicator--Third-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Henry H. Gorringe; Acting-Masters, J. F. Reed and D. P. Slattery; Acting-Ensigns, W. Zimmerman, B. C. Wheeler and J. W. Foster; Acting-Master's Mates, L. C. Ball, John Davis, Lewis Lehman, Henry Kane and A. A. King; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, C. E. Vaughn; Actin-Assistant Paymaster, F. W. Hanson; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Thomas Cook; Acting-Second-Assistants, Chas. Tistandt, Anthony Courtway and James O'Neil; Acting-Third-Assistants, S. H. Brogan, Andrew Lusk and John Link; Acting-Gunner, Wm. H. Barton; Acting-Carpenter, James Trulty. Hastings--Fourth-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, J. S. Watson; Acting-Master, Wm. Neil; Acting-Ensigns, C. H. Reed and Jas. McDonald; Acting-Master's Mates, E. C. Urner and W. H. Gray; Assistant Surgeon, James M. Flint; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, P. J. Stone, Jr.; Engineers: A
ing, about noon joined hands with Buckner in the center, and took command of their united forces, when a chargee was made by Forrest's cavalry on our infantry supporting a battery of six pieces, which was taken. Col. Hanson, 2d Kentucky, and Col. Cook, 32d Tennessee, as well as Maj. Brown, 20th Mississippi, officially report that, after Buckner's defeat of McClernand, on the morning of the 15th, there was no obstacle to the escape of their entire force southward or up the Cumberland. Col. Hags were everywhere, and a door could not be opened without hearing groans. And in his list of regiments we do not find the 20th Mississippi, whose commander, Maj. W. M. Brown, officially reports that he surrendered 454; nor the 32d Tennessee, Col. Cook, who reports that he surrendered 538. Gen. Grant's report makes his captures 12,000 to 15,000 prisoners, at least 40 pieces of artillery, and a large amount of stores, horses, mules, and other public property. to say nothing of arms and muni
most advantageous positions, unhitched their horses and sent them to a place of safety — the guns having been brought to bear on our vessels, but awaiting the arrival of the boats before opening fire. At 4 A. M., however — the moon having set, obscuring the movements on shore, but leaving our gunboats distinctly visible to the Rebel gunners in the clear star-light — Magruder, unable to wait longer for the fleet, lest he should be overtaken by daybreak, fired the signal-gun himself; while Col. Cook led a storming party of 500, supported by Griffin's battalion and by sharpshooters, to the assault on our Massachusetts men encamped on the wharf. The assault miscarried. The wharfplanks having been taken up between our men and the land, and piled up to form a rude barricade in their front, it was necessary that the assailants should wade through the water of the bay, carrying scaling-ladders as well as muskets; while not only were our landsmen by this time wide awake and firing vigoro<
main body, under Gen. Blunt, struck at Springfield, known to be filled with Federal munitions and provisions, lightly guarded. But that important post had by this time been rudely fortified with detached earthworks, which were of decided service against raw, undisciplined troops, as Marmaduke's appear to have been. Springfield was held by Brig.-Gen. E. B. Brown, Missouri militia, whose entire strength can not have exceeded 1,200 men, mainly State militia, with 156 of the 118th Iowa, Lt.-Col. Thos. Cook, reinforced, on the instant, by some 300 convalescents from the hospitals, known in army jargon as the Quinine Brigade, Col. B. Crabb. With this motley force, Brown fought the Rebels bravely and skillfully from 10 A. M. Jan. 8. till dark; when they desisted and drew off, having taken one gun and lost some 200 men. Our loss was 14 killed, 145 wounded, and 5 missing; but among our wounded was Gen. Brown, whose valor had animated his men to fight gallantly, and whose able disposition
w set a bird, or wag a tail with any dog in Christendom. If the Conestoga be not peculiarly entitled to the term lucky, there is no luck extant. The following are the names of the officers: Captain, S. L. Phelps; First Master, John F. Duke; Second Master, Chas. P. Noble; Third Master, Benjamin Sebastian; Fourth Master, H. Cutter; Master's Mate, James Kearney; Surgeon, W. H. Wilson; Purser, Alfred Phelps; Pilots, A. M. Jordan, Wm. M. Attenborough; Gunner, Henry Hamilton; First Engineer, Thos. Cook; Second Engineer, Alexander Magee; Third Engineer, Michael Norton; Fourth Engineer, James O'Neil. I may add, that the officers, without exception, are gentlemen in the complete sense of the word, and possess, in addition to this qualification, a thorough knowledge of their duties. The efficacy of Capt. Phelps is so well known, that special reference to it would be superfluous. Suffice it that an abler or more gallant officer never trod a plank. Fort Donelson, as we passed it, seemed
Joseph Bright. Abijah Brooks. Abijah Brown. James Brown. Jonathan Brown. William Brown. Alexander Buckingham. John Bucknam. John Bull. Stephen Butterfield. John Capell. Daniel Carmichael. Thaddeus Carter. John Cassell. Isaac Champney. Nathaniel Champney. Samuel Champney. Thomas Champney. Joseph Child. Moses Child. Norman Clark. James Connor. Benjamin Cook. Caleb Cook. Ephraim Cook. James Cook. Joshua Cook. Thomas Cook. Caleb Coolidge. Joseph Coolidge. Joshua Coolidge. Nathaniel Coolidge. Simon Coolidge. Thomas Coolidge. Thomas Cooper. Richard Crease. Jazaniah Crosby. John Crosby. William Crosby. Ishmael Cutler. Prince Cutler. Ammi Cutter, Jr. James Cutter. Richard Cutter. Samuel Cutter. William Cutter, Jr. Silent Cutting. Benjamin Dana. Ezra Dana. John Dana. Richard Dana. Henry Darling. Daniel Doland. Paul Dexter. James Dick
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