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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Gustave Cook or search for Gustave Cook in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
through we hurry on to Jackson. But Vicksburg falls 'ere we can cross the Big Black, and Sherman tries to intercept, but strikes us only in our works at Jackson. Four stands of colors lie amid a thousand killed and wounded before the muzzles of Cook's and Slocomb's guns. Bragg calls in turn and Breckinridge is sent. The Fifth is pushed to Rome and Chattanooga. The echoes of the first guns salute them as they reach there. We strike at Glass's Mill, and plunging through the Chickamauga, lle flag of the Fifth Texas, with its 56 bullet holes through it, and General Lee brought down the house by his eloquent allusion to it. General Lee, the dashing cavalryman of the Army of Northern Virginia, was appropriately introduced by Judge Gustave Cook, the gallant Colonel of the Texas Rangers, who in few but well-chosen words presented to the audience the soldier-orator of Virginia. Nowhere has General Lee's lecture excited more appreciative or enthusiastic applause. Then followed a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
raise that soldiers could expect; and Anthony and Reid are left to mark its passage. Vicksburg is sore beset, and Johnston calls and Breckinridge is going, and the Fifth Company asks to follow. Mobile, in passing, gives us new recruits, as rushing through we hurry on to Jackson. But Vicksburg falls 'ere we can cross the Big Black, and Sherman tries to intercept, but strikes us only in our works at Jackson. Four stands of colors lie amid a thousand killed and wounded before the muzzles of Cook's and Slocomb's guns. Bragg calls in turn and Breckinridge is sent. The Fifth is pushed to Rome and Chattanooga. The echoes of the first guns salute them as they reach there. We strike at Glass's Mill, and plunging through the Chickamauga, leave on its banks a holocaust of dead. 'Tis Blair meeting a fate he had just predicted, and Morel, and Anderson, and Belsom, and Bailey and Daigle! We laid them shrouded in their blankets, and move to strike elsewhere. Morning finds us on the ri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
gain at our earliest opportunity. The General was escorted to Gray's Opera-House by the Houston Light Guard and the committees, and was greeted there by a large and enthusiastic audience. Among the flags which decorated the stage was the old battle flag of the Fifth Texas, with its 56 bullet holes through it, and General Lee brought down the house by his eloquent allusion to it. General Lee, the dashing cavalryman of the Army of Northern Virginia, was appropriately introduced by Judge Gustave Cook, the gallant Colonel of the Texas Rangers, who in few but well-chosen words presented to the audience the soldier-orator of Virginia. Nowhere has General Lee's lecture excited more appreciative or enthusiastic applause. Then followed a magnificent banquet in the beautiful dining-hall of the Capitol Hotel, which was presided over by Hon. J. C. Hutcheson, and at which there were a number of good speeches in response to appropriate toasts. General George D. Johnston, our able and