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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 5 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
ntains a great deal of historic value, and is a highly prized addition to our library. Books received. We acknowledge the receipt of the following books, which will be noticed more fully hereafter: From D. Appleton & Co., New York: Cooke's Life of General R. E. Lee. A military biography of Stonewall Jackson. By Colonel John Esten Cooke. With an appendix (containing an account of the Inauguration of Foley's statue, &c.), by Rev. J. Wm. Jones. General Joseph E. Johnston's NarraColonel John Esten Cooke. With an appendix (containing an account of the Inauguration of Foley's statue, &c.), by Rev. J. Wm. Jones. General Joseph E. Johnston's Narrative. Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes and letters of General R. E. Lee. By Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D. Sherman's Memoirs and Shuckers' Life of Chief justice Chase. From the publishers, Harper Brothers, New York (through West & Johnston, Richmond): Draper's Civil war in America. From J. B. Lippincott, Philadelphia (through West & Johnston): Dixon's New America. From West & Johnston, Richmond: A beautiful lithograph of the Ordinance of Secession of Virginia, and the signatures of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
Book notices. Cooke's Life of General R. E. Lee. D. Appleton & Co., New York. This book was published in 1871, and has been so long before the public that it need now receive no extended review at our hands. Colonel Cooke wields a facile pen, and his books are always entertaining. There are errors in the strictly Military part of this biography which a more rigid study of the officia corrected in the edition before us. A military biography of Stonewall Jackson. By Colonel John Esten Cooke. With an appendix (containing an account of the Inauguration of Foley's statue), by Rev. J. Wm. Jones. D. Appleton & Co., New York. Cooke's Life of Jackson was originally published during the war, and was rewritten, and republished in 1866. The enterprising publishers have broughtr it is meeting with a large sale. It is to be regretted that the publishers did not give Colonel Cooke the opportunity of revising and correcting his work, for while the book is very readable, an
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
, from the Wilderness to Appomattox Court-House, shall ever be written, the country will be surprised to hear how much was done by one whose name is hardly connected in the public mind with these achievements. The more General Meade's career is studied, the greater does his ability as a soldier appear; and lest we should seem to over-estimate him, we give the opinion of General Lee, the man of all others best qualified to judge of the skill of our generals. In an article written by Colonel J. Esten Cooke, who served in the Southern army, on the staff of General J. E. B. Stuart, that officer says: General Lee esteemed the late General Meade very highly as a soldier, declaring that he was the best officer in the Federal army, and had given him more trouble than any of them. General Grant, too, has put on record his estimate of Meade's ability. Writing not long before the closing campaign of the war, he said: General Meade is one of our truest men, and ablest officers. He
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Stuart in camp and field. (search)
General Stuart in camp and field. Colonel John Esten Cooke. The famous General Jeb Stuart was, perhaps, the most picturesque figure moving on the great arena of the late civil war. Young, gay, gallant; wearing a uniform brilliant with gold braid, golden spurs, and a hat looped up with a golden star and decorated with a black plume; going on marches at the head of his column with his banjo-player gayly thrumming behind him; leading his troops to battle with a camp song on his lips; here to-day and away to-morrow, raiding, fighting, laughing, dancing, and as famous for his gallantry toward women as for his reckless courage. Stuart was in every particular a singular and striking human being, drawing to himself the strongest public interest both as a man and a soldier. Of his military ability as a cavalry leader, General Sedgwick probably summed up the general opinion when he said: Stuart is the best cavalryman ever foaled in North America. Of his courage, devotion, and many lovab
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
haps, responsible for the remarkable fact that no history of A. P. Hill has yet been given to the public. Any adequate life of the Confederate commander, or of his foremost lieutenant, so necessarily involves constant presentation of the deeds wrought by one less lofty in character, steadfast in purpose, and terrible in battle than either, that we may not be surprised if the general public has thus far been satisfied with the frequent recurrence of his name and deeds in the pages of Dabney, Cooke, McCabe, Randolph, and others. But it is not just to one who, in any other association, would have been facile princess; of whom it may truthfully be said that he was a determining factor in every important battle of the campaigns in the East, that his achievements should serve the one purpose of magnifying others, or that he should be seen only in the reflected light of stars of larger magnitude. Measured by the standards which men apply to the claimants of mastership in war, Hill was
f fiction, at least vindicate the claims of his section to force and originality. He had been followed up the thorny path by many who stopped half-way, turned back, or sunk forgotten even before reaching that far. Few, indeed, of their works ever went beyond their own boundaries; and those few rarely sent back a record. Exceptions there were, however, who pressed Mr. Simms hard for his position on the topmost peak; and most of these adventurous climbers were of the softer sex. John Esten Cooke had written a very clever novel of the olden society, called Virginia Comedians. It had promised a brilliant future, when his style and method should both ripen; a promise that had not, so far, been kept by two or three succeeding ventures launched on these doubtful waters. Hon. Jere Clemens, of Alabama, had commenced a series of strong, if somewhat convulsive, stories of western character. Mustang gray and Bernard Lile, scenting strongly of camp-fire and pine-top, yet had many advan
it be said that he had any important success to offset this loss. He had not defeated his adversary in any of the battle-fields of the campaign, nor did it seem that he had stricken him any serious blow. The Army of Northern Virginia, not reinforced until it reached Hanover Junction, and then only by about 9,000 men, had repulsed every assault, and in the final trial of strength with a force vastly its superior, had inflicted upon the enemy, in about an hour, a loss of 13,000 men. John Esten Cooke, in Eclectic Magazine, May, 1872. When the army drew closer to Richmond, Mr. Davis's visits to General Lee, which had been previously made as often as his executive labor permitted, were paid every day, and the spirits in which the President returned were dependent on the General's account of the progress of the enemy; his temper always became more cheerful as affairs looked darker. Mr. Davis had a childlike faith in the providential care of the Just Cause by Almighty God, and a d
e, A. A. G., was ever present, fearless, and untiring in the zealous discharge of the duties assigned him. Major Samuel Hardin Hairstone, Q. M., and Major Dabney Ball, C. S., were prevented by their duties of office from participating in the dangers of the conflict, but are entitled to my thanks for the thorough discharge of their duties. The following officers, attached to my staff, deserve honorable mention in this report for their valuable services; Captain Redmond Burke, Lieutenant John Esten Cooke, ordnance officer; Lieutenant J. S. W. Hairstone, C. S. A.; Lieutenant James R. Christian, Third Virginia cavalry; Lieutenant Chiswell Dabney, Aid; volunteer Aids Captain W. D. Farley and W. E. Towles — they having contributed their full share to whatever success was achieved by the brigade. My escort did good service. Private Frank Stringfellow, Fourth Virginia cavalry, was particularly conspicuous for gallantry and efficiency at Cold Harbor. The majority of the Hanover comp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
by actors on both sides of the great struggle, are many of them of deep interest, and some of them of great historic value. The Confederate sketches in the volume are the following: A campaign with sharpshooters, by Captain John D. Young; A Ruse of war, by Captain John Scott; Confederate negro enlistments, by Edward Spencer; Fire, sword and the Halter, by General J. D. Imboden; Flight and capture of Jefferson Davis, by J. H. Reagan; General Stuart in camp and Field, by Colonel J. E. Cooke; Lee and Grant in the Wilderness, by General C. M. Wilcox; Lee in Pennsylvania, by General James Longtreet; Lee's West Virginia campaign, by General A. L. Long; Morgan's Indiana and Ohio raid, by General Basil W. Duke; Mr. Lincoln and the force bill, by Hon. A. R. Boteler; Stonewall Jackson and his men, by Major H. Kyd Douglas; Stonewall Jackson's Valley campaign, by Colonel William Allan; The battle of Fleetwood, by Major H. B. McClellan; The Black horse cavalry, by
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
, paper, binding and general make up are in the usual good style of the great publishing house of A. S. Barnes & Co. Stories of the old Dominion. By Colonel John Esten Cooke. New York: Harper & Brothers. This is a charming book, designed for children and admirably fulfilling its design, but of deep interest to grown people as well. We learn through a private channel that Colonel Cooke wrote this book originally for his own children, and read to them each chapter as it was completed; and thus interesting his own children he has prepared a book which will make many other little eyes all over the land sparkle with delight, while it will at the same time impart, in the most pleasant manner, important historic information. We are inclined to regard this as in many respects the very best book which Colonel Cooke's facile and prolific pen has produced. It is beautifully gotten up by the publishers. Annals of the army of Tennessee. The first volume of this magazine can b
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