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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 18 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 15 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John R. Cooke or search for John R. Cooke in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 2 document sections:

hus created, and G. B. Anderson's brigade was broken, and retired--General Anderson himself being mortally wounded. Major-General R. H. Anderson and Brigadier-General Wright were also wounded and borne from the field. The heavy masses of the enemy again moved forward, being opposed only by four pieces of artillery, supported by a few hundreds of men, belonging to different brigades, rallied by General D. H. Hill and other officers, and parts of Walker's and R. H. Anderson's commands--Colonel Cooke, with the Twenty-seventh North-Carolina regiment, of Walker's brigade, standing boldly in line without a cartridge. The firm front presented by this small force, and the well-directed fire of the artillery, under Captain Miller of the Washington artillery, and Captain Boyce's South-Carolina battery, checked the progress of the enemy, and in about an hour and a half he retired. Another attack was made soon afterward, a little further to the right, but was repulsed by Miller's guns, whic
lker's division, and four pieces of artillery, Cooke's regiment of that division being without a can the enemy's masses moved forward against us. Cooke stood with his empty guns, and waved his colorrtain if such was the case, I detached Colonel John R. Cooke with his regiment, (the Twenty-seventhint of woods near the position assigned to Colonel Cooke, commanding the Twenty-seventh North Carolenemy having the cover of the woods, while Colonel Cooke's command was on the open ground, this offternoon, Major-General Longstreet directed Colonel Cooke, with his own regiment (Twenty-seventh Noreir ammunition being now almost exhausted, Colonel Cooke very properly gave the order to fall back,y-seventh North Carolina, commanded by Colonel John R. Cooke, and the Third Arkansas volunteers, cot-Colonel Bryson, of the Twenty-fifth, and Adjutant Cooke, of the Twenty-fourth North Carolina regim eminently praiseworthy. Lieutenant and Adjutant Cooke, of the Twenty-fourth, was foremost in lea[2 more...]