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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 22 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 9 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 1 1 Browse Search
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John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Appendix B. (search)
rst Corps), July 21, 1861. From a field return for that date, but dated September 25, 1861. The reports following show other combinations during the battle. Brigadier-General G. T. Beauregard. Infantry. First Brigade. Brigadier-General M. L. Bonham. 11th North Carolina. 2d South Carolina. 3d South Carolina. 7th South Carolina. 8th South Carolina. Third Brigade. Brigadier-General D. R. Jones. 17th Mississippi. 18th Mississippi. 5th South Carolina. Fifth Brigade. Colonel P. St. George Cooke. 1st Louisiana Battalion. 8th Virginia, seven companies. 18th Virginia, seven companies. 19th Virginia, seven companies. 28th Virginia, seven companies. 49th Virginia, three companies. Second Brigade. Brigadier-General R. S. Ewell. 5th Alabama. 6th Alabama. 6th Louisiana. Fourth Brigade. Brigadier-General J. Longstreet. 5th North Carolina. 1st Virginia. 11th Virginia. 17th Virginia. Sixth Brigade. Colonel J. A. Early. 13th Mississippi. 4th South Carolina.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
orner, at the crossing of Totopotomoy Creek. The cavalry under General Cooke and Colonel Farnsworth moved with the main army, and the force right and rear of Reynolds; Butterfield was directed to support General Cooke's, and subsequently Martindale's right, while Sykes was held re The horsemen in the swampy bottom-lands are intended to represent Cooke's Union cavalry. General Longstreet's extreme right did not extendging on our left, and having no enemy in his front, while Emory, of Cooke's cavalry, with artillery, was near at hand to do the duty assignedjoin McCall, arriving opportunely in rear of Griffin's left. General Cooke was instructed to take position, with cavalry, under the hills n to follow, intending to attack with Sykes's division and Emory of Cooke's cavalry, leaving Morell and McCall to hold the other lines in chehickahominy. The loss of the guns was due to the fact that some of Cooke's cavalry which had been directed Ruins of Gaines's Mill, lookin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
d the foe in every quarter, and was ready to renew the contest at an opportune moment. Our killed and wounded were numbered by thousands; the loss of the Confederates may be imagined. It is impossible to estimate the casualties of each of these battles, so quickly did one follow another. Our total loss in these battles is recorded as 15,849, while that of the Confederates sums up to 20,135. The loss in the Fifth Corps was 7601. This does not include the losses of Slocum's division and Cooke's cavalry engaged with us at Gaines's Mill, nor of Couch's division and the brigades of Caldwell, Meagher, and Sickles serving with it at Malvern. [See pp. 314-318.]--F. J. P. While taking Meagher's brigade to the front, I crossed a portion of the ground over which a large column had advanced to attack us, and had a fair opportunity of judging of the effect of our fire upon the ranks of the enemy. General Fitz John Porter's headquarters in the Westover mansion, camp at Harrison's La
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., With the cavalry on the Peninsula. (search)
t Hampton, it produced a similar effect upon the men. Few but cavalry names reached the ears of the army on the day of the evacuation and pursuit. Stoneman and Cooke, on the right, with the 1st and 6th Regulars, struck cavalry, infantry, batteries, redoubts, and ravines, and pushed their attack with audacity. Cavalrymen gallop to help the Fifth Corps to hold its ground until dark will never be forgotten, and it was not devoid of heroic cavalry effort. Fragments of the reserve under General Cooke stood massed in the valley of the Chickahominy, on its left bank. About 5 P. M., when it was evident that we were being pressed on the right and left of our lour center and right, but that it was not attempted was a discredit to Stuart's cavalry. At Harrison's Landing, General Stoneman having taken sick-leave and General Cooke having been relieved, on the 5th of July I was appointed acting Brigadier-General and placed in command of all the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac, and at o
der a musket in defence of the mother of deaa statesmen, right or wrong; but, alas! I might have been first called upon to encounter the associates of childhood in the honest mountains and valleys of her west. What dire complications of crime. To cut this gordian knot of horrors my sword had instinctively turned against the usurping majesty of cotton. I owe Virginia little, my country much. She has intrusted me with a distant command, and I shall remain under her flag as long as it waves the sign of the National Constitutional Government. In these far distant mountains I could only offer patriotic prayers for the result of the vote on the 23d of May. I trust that reason may have then recovered her sway — that the voice of a majority may not have been restrained by bayonets; that sounding above the clamor of anarchy, and still respected, it may have pronounced the loyalty and just attitude of the State. P. St. George Cooke, Colonel Second Regiment United States Dragoons.
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 1: early recollections of California. 1846-1848. (search)
rrived. Colonel Mason also arrived by sea from Callao in the store-ship Erie, and P. St. George Cooke's battalion of Mormons reached San Luis Rey. A. J. Smith and George Stoneman were with him, and les, which we reached in about three hours, the infantry following on foot. We found Colonel P. St. George Cooke living at the house of a Mr. Pryor, and the company of dragoons, with A. J. Smith, Daunteer escort out of the battalion of Mormons that was then stationed at San Luis Rey, under Colonel Cooke and a Major Hunt. This battalion was only enlisted for one year, and the time for their disest material for lumber. He had under him four white men, Mormons, who had been discharged from Cooke's battalion, and some Indians. These were engaged in hewing logs, building a mill-dam, and puttttalion of five companies of Mormons (raised bi Allen, who died on the way, and was succeeded by Cooke) was discharged at Los Angeles, California, in the early summer of 1847, most of the men went to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
in which he gives a very correct and impartial statement of the condition of affairs in the Territory......Sept. 9, 1856 Governor Robinson, John Brown, Jr., and H. H. Williams, treason prisoners at Lecompton, released on bail......Sept. 10, 1856 Capt. James A. Harvey's Lawrence force, after a six hours fight at Hickory Point, Jefferson county, compel the proslavery men to surrender; later in the day 101 of his men, having disobeyed the governor's orders to disband, are captured by Colonel Cooke, U. S. A., and confined in camp at Lecompton. About twenty of these men were convicted in October of murder, and sentenced to twenty years in the penitentiary)......Sept. 13, 1856 John Brown assists the free-State men at Lawrence in the defence of the town; Governor Geary orders Woodson and Strickler to disband the pro-slavery army on the Wakarusa......Sept. 14, 1856 The pro-slavery forces encamped near Lawrence since the 14th are prevailed upon by the governor to disband and retu
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
erning that part of the journey. Gibson also wrote two other diaries on a trip to Chihuahua and return in 1847. The journals of Captain Johnson and of Colonel P. St. George Cooke on the march from Santa Fe to California appeared in House executive document 41, Ist Sess. 30th Congress, and Colonel Cooke's The Journal of a March frColonel Cooke's The Journal of a March from Santa Fe to San Diego 1846-47 was printed in Sen. Ex. Doc. 2 special Sess. 31st Cong. Other literary productions of Colonel Cooke were The conquest of New Mexico and California (1878) and Scenes and adventures in army life (1857). Kearny, before proceeding to California, planned for the holding of New Mexico, and one of theColonel Cooke were The conquest of New Mexico and California (1878) and Scenes and adventures in army life (1857). Kearny, before proceeding to California, planned for the holding of New Mexico, and one of the memorable expeditions of the war resulted, that of Colonel A. W. Doniphan. It was accurately recorded by John T. Hughes in Doniphan's expedition; containing an account of the conquest of New Mexico, General Kearny's overland expedition to California, Doniphan's campaign against the Navajos, his unparalleled March upon Chihuahua
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Considerations on the currency and banking system of the United States, 430 Considerations upon the Act of Parliament whereby a duty is laid . . . on Molasses, 428 Conspiracy of Pontiac, 189 Constance Trescott, 90 Constitutional history of England, 197 Constitutional view of the late War between the States, 182 Contrast, the, 493 Control of Trusts, the, 442 Convict 999, 287 Convito, 488 Conway, Moncure D., 120 Cook, Joseph, 210 Cooke, John Esten, 67-68, 69 Cooke, P. St. George, 143 Cooke, Rose Terry, 86 Coolen Bawn, the, 511 Coomassie and Magdala, 163 Cooper, James Fenimore, 6, 66, 67. 68, 85, 89, 190, 227, 520, 549, 550 551, 563, 579 Cooper, Peter, 348 Cooper, Thomas, 433 Copernicus, 524 Copley, John, 498 Corea, The Hermit Nation, 155 Corleone, 88 Cormon, 271 Corneille, 591 Cornell, 41, 177, 354, 479 Corplanter, 154 Coronado, 621 Corruptions of Christianity, 521 Cosi Fan Tutte, 449 Cosmopolitan, 316 Cost
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
on the ground. Longstreet has imitated this movement on the extreme left of the Federal line, and the greater part of Butterfield's brigade, being cut off from the rest of the army, barely escaped through the Upper Duane bridge. The regular cavalry, led by a chief of great personal bravery, but more accustomed to the pursuit of Indians than to handling squadrons before a disciplined enemy, tries in vain to regain a portion of what has been lost. Placed at the bottom of the valley, General Cooke, in order to lead his men to the charge, makes them scale the steep, clayey acclivities, the summit of which is already occupied by the right wing of the Confederates; consequently, his horses are soon out of wind. The Federal cavalry, in confronting the enemy's lines, which are unflinchingly awaiting its approach, disperses into skirmishing squads, which resort to pistol-fighting, after the manner they had learned in the far West. Such a conflict could not last more than a few minutes
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