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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 41 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 17 5 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 11 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 3 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Philip St. George Cooke or search for Philip St. George Cooke in all documents.

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eighteenth, and pitched our tents for the night, and thus began our improvements. At the beginning, there were about ninety persons in all. The work commenced the second day on the farm. May thirtieth we established a camp on Major Nutt's farm, near falls Church, Virginia, calling it Camp Rucker. The people at this place had to be sheltered in tents, there being no houses in the vicinity belonging to rebel owners. On the same day, May thirtieth, we commenced an encampment on rebel Cooke's farm, near Langley, on the Leesburgh turnpike. This encampment we called camp Wadsworth. A branch of this camp was shortly after formed on a farm of rebel Means near by. A week later we organized the two encampments — Camp Todd, where General Casey had his encampment formerly, near by Fort Albany, and Camp Beckwith on McVay's and Jackson's farms, near Lewinsville. The number of the several encampments on June thirtieth is as follows: Camp Springdale, three hundred; Camp Todd, two hundre
ted of one large Whitworth gun, two fine Rodmans, and three brass field pieces; one of these, however, was so badly broken up as to be worthless, and was left upon the field. Besides the rebels killed, whom I have mentioned, there was Brigadier-General Cooke, a son of General Philip St. George Cooke, of the Union army. His body was left on the field. After the fight had closed, we buried all our dead, brought off all our wounded, and came over Broad Run in perfect order and safety. WeGeneral Philip St. George Cooke, of the Union army. His body was left on the field. After the fight had closed, we buried all our dead, brought off all our wounded, and came over Broad Run in perfect order and safety. We have not lost a dollar's worth of property by capture. Our forces are now safely and securely posted, our trains all parked, and the army in excellent spirits. The rebel Colonel Thompson states that it was General Lee's object to head us off before reaching Centreville, and supposed when he made the attack upon General Warren he was at the head of the entire army with his corps; consequently he only threw forward one portion of D. P. Hill's corps, numbering in all about twelve thousand men