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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
Menotomy became a precinct, with substantially the same bounds which were assigned to it when it was incorporated as a town in 1807. This separation appears to have been entirely amicable, and a spirit of Christian fellowship and love is indicated by an act of the church mentioned by Dr. Holmes in Coll. Mass. Hist. Soc., VII. 33: On the Lord's day, September 9, 1739, a church was gathered in this precinct by the Rev. Mr. Hancock of Lexington; and on the 12th day of the same month, the Rev. Samuel Cooke was ordained its pastor. On this occasion, the First Church in Cambridge voted, that £ 25 be given out of the church stock to the Second Church in Cambridge, to furnish their communion table in a decent manner. In 1753 the First Parish resolved to erect a new meeting-house, and desired the College to defray a part of the expense; whereupon the corporation voted, Dec. 3, 1753, to pay one seventh part of the charge of said house, provided the students should have the use of the who
the first signer of the declaration of Independence; Thomas, b. 13 July 1703, a prosperous merchant in Boston, a member of the Council, d. of apoplexy 1 Aug. 1763, and bequeathed his fortune to his nephew John, afterwards Governor; Elizabeth, b. 5 Feb. 1704-5, m. Rev. Jonathan Bowman of Dorchester; Ebenezer, b. 7 Dec. 1710, grad, H. C. 1728, ord. colleague with his father 2 Jan. 1734, and d. 28 Jan. 1740; Lucy, b. 20 Ap. 1713, m. Rev. Nicholas Bowes of Concord; after his death she m. Rev. Samuel Cooke of Menot. and d. 21 Sept. 1768; her dau. Lucy m. Rev. Jonas Clark (who succeeded Bishop Hancock at Lexington), and had twelve children, of whom Mary m. Prof. Henry Ware, Sen., Lucy m. Rev. Thaddeus Fiske of W. Camb., and Martha m. Rev. William Harris of Salem. 5. Samuel, s. of Nathaniel (2), was a cordwainer, rem. to Lexington about 1698, sold his estate there in 1716, and returned to Camb., inherited the homestead, which he sold to Samuel Danforth in 1725, rem. to Chs. where he d.
the first signer of the declaration of Independence; Thomas, b. 13 July 1703, a prosperous merchant in Boston, a member of the Council, d. of apoplexy 1 Aug. 1763, and bequeathed his fortune to his nephew John, afterwards Governor; Elizabeth, b. 5 Feb. 1704-5, m. Rev. Jonathan Bowman of Dorchester; Ebenezer, b. 7 Dec. 1710, grad, H. C. 1728, ord. colleague with his father 2 Jan. 1734, and d. 28 Jan. 1740; Lucy, b. 20 Ap. 1713, m. Rev. Nicholas Bowes of Concord; after his death she m. Rev. Samuel Cooke of Menot. and d. 21 Sept. 1768; her dau. Lucy m. Rev. Jonas Clark (who succeeded Bishop Hancock at Lexington), and had twelve children, of whom Mary m. Prof. Henry Ware, Sen., Lucy m. Rev. Thaddeus Fiske of W. Camb., and Martha m. Rev. William Harris of Salem. 5. Samuel, s. of Nathaniel (2), was a cordwainer, rem. to Lexington about 1698, sold his estate there in 1716, and returned to Camb., inherited the homestead, which he sold to Samuel Danforth in 1725, rem. to Chs. where he d.
istory. 1693 The town granted Menotomy people a quarter of an acre of land, upon their common, near Jason Russell's house, near the highway, for the accommodation of a school-house (Paige, 373). Some entries from the Proprietors' Records of Cambridge are here inserted, to show a few transactions of interest relating to this part of the town. 1689. The names of the inhabitants who are not proprietors, who have granted to them lands at Menotomy: Abraham Watson, John Dickson, Samuel Cooke, Philip Cooke, Joseph Adams, Gershom Cutter, William Cutter, Jonathan Dunster. Ministry Lot, 1689. Forty acres for the ministry, bounded Concord Road northeast, the small farms northwest, common land yet undivided southwest, last range of lots, &c., southeast. Jason Russell bought Mr. Pelham's lot of twenty acres in the first Division of the Rocks, and fenced the same for his particular improvement, 1689. William Russell having bought a lot laid out to Nathaniel Hancock; also a
Ephraim Frost, jr. Joseph Adams, jr. Samuel Cooke, Pastor John Fillebrown John Williamsay of July, 1739. After the settlement of Mr. Cooke, the affairs of the Precinct were very uniforecinct. 1742 The remarks found in the Rev. Mr. Cooke's diary are continued: 1742, Jan. 3.town, Turell of Medford, Bowes of Bedford, and Cooke of Cambridge—voted it not advisable, under theticed in the Genealogies. In this year Mr. Cooke preached the sermon at the ordination of Revy studied for the ministry with his pastor Rev. Mr. Cooke. In 1764 Mr. Dunster had but one child, a dated Dec. 13, 1772, on Prov. 8: 17. In it Mr. Cooke alludes to the origin of this religious societreat at the battle of Lexington. The Rev. Samuel Cooke's house, which was built in 1740, and any benefit. In a sermon, Sept. 20, 1778, Mr. Cooke indulged in the favorite phrases of the time records give no further information. 1779, Mr. Cooke inserted the following paragraph in referenc[93 more...]
d; Rev. Mr. Newell made the Concluding Prayer. Rev. Mr. Briggs of Lexington was absent on account of ill health at the time of this installation. To Mr. Damon's time the following persons had been Deacons: John Cutter and John Winship, chosen 1739; Thomas Hall and Joseph Adams, chosen 1769; Ephraim Frost and John Adams, chosen 1792; Ephraim Cutter, chosen before 1828; Miles Gardner, chosen 1828. To his time, also, three Covenants had been in use by the Church: (1) The Covenant used by Mr. Cooke, the first minister, and his successor Dr. Fiske; (2) The Covenant by Mr. Hedge; (3) An abridgement of the first, all which are entered on the records. Book closing with the sixth ministry, Mr. Brown's. 1835, April 15. Mr. Damon gives a list of 40 communicants—all that belong to said Church as far as can be ascertained, and then follows a list of 7 become communicants by residence among us. 1844, Jan., 2d Sunday William Ware commenced his ministry without installation serv
signed May 20, 1873. The present minister is the Rev. William F. Potter, who began to preach to the Society on the first Sunday in July, 1876. Thanks are extended to Mr. Arthur W. Peirce for assistance in preparing this sketch. Orthodox Congregational Society.—On the evening of June 8, 1842, several members of Orthodox churches, residing in West Cambridge and its vicinity, met at the residence of Miss Anna Bradshaw, for religious worship. Miss Bradshaw, the grand-daughter of the Rev. Samuel Cooke, the first minister of the Old Parish of the town (1739-1783), resided in the old parsonage of her grandfather on Pleasant Street, next the burying-ground. The Rev. Dr. Albro, of Cambridge, was present on the above evening, and addressed the meeting. A weekly meeting for conference and prayer was at this time established. July 10, following, a sermon was preached under a large tent, erected on the grounds of Miss A. Bradshaw, for the celebration of national independence. An appoi
bap. 10 Mar. 1745, d. 31 Aug. 1753, a. 9 yrs. (Cooke); twin children, b. Jan. and bap. 1748, d. Janbap. 17 June, 1750, d. 25 Aug. 1753, a 4 yrs. (Cooke); Bette, b. 20 (Apr.) bap. 23 Aug. 1752, d. 19, m. 23 Mar. 1817. See Wyman, 235. Cook or Cooke, Sarah, widow, adm. ch. at organization, 9 Se4 Sept. 1774. J. Dolle—from Cambridge, at Wid. Cooke's—d. 7 Jan. 1776, a. 18 mos. See Wyman's Charl. 1760, one entry). The first wife of Rev. Samuel Cooke was Sarah Porter, dau. of Samuel and Annr in the Am. Quar. Register for 1839, says, Mr. Cooke was very eminent among the ministers of his since been removed. The family boarded with Miss Cooke, who then kept a genteel boarding-house in hboro, m. Sarah Shattuck of Camb. 12 Dec. 1739—Cooke's Private Journal. Ferguson, John, had son,37 [gravestone in enclosure of family of Rev. Samuel Cooke, in the Pct. Burying Ground]. It is saidy, 1775, states Jabez Wyman used to work for Mr. Cooke; which fact is borne out in a deed in the ha[25 more...
battle, 134, 135 Choice of successor to Rev. Mr. Cooke, 104, 105 Church covenants, 25, 119 ssell, April 19, 1775, 68-70, 74, 75; of Rev. Samuel Cooke, 101 Deaths of three members of the W James Robbins, 44 Dudleian Lecture, by Rev. Mr. Cooke, 41; by Rev. Mr. Damon, 228 Earthquakes at Menotomy on April 19, 1776, 74, 75; of Rev. Mr. Cooke, to the Rev. Isaiah Dunster, 39, 40 Lex, 142, 143, 166, 163, 165 Likeness of the Rev. Mr. Cooke, 89 Locke School House, 165 Longevit, 46, 48, 93, 94 Obituary notice of the Rev. Samuel Cooke, 103; of Rev. Thaddeus Fiske, 240; of er by John Hill, 146 Pastor's Diary, by Rev. Mr. Cooke, 30-32 Percy's letters on the events of, 66, 61, 64, 65, 80, 81, 82 Petition of Samuel Cooke to sell his children's real estate, 40, 41; off as a distinct parish, 2 Sermon, at Rev. Mr. Cooke's ordination, by Rev. E. Turell, 30; by Prangdon at Watertown, cited, 66 Sermons by Mr. Cooke, 32-37, 39, 41-47, 49-51, 57, 84-89, 93, 94,[6 more...]
6, 171, 177, 184, 196, 197, 204, 224, 240, 241, 272, 280, 298, 314, 315, 341, 343, 360 Clay, 204, 301 Cleaves, 68, 71 Clinton, 342 Cobb, 349 Codner, 204, 261 Coffin, 204 Coggin, 206, 329 Cogswell, 206 Colburn, 348 Cole, 110, 112, 120, 131, 206, 296, 349 Coleman, 346 Collins, 8, 12, 18, 206, 276, 339 Colman, 31 Comee, 205 Comston, 206, 299 Coning, 341 Connor, 348 Convers and Converse, 15, 112, 131, 164, 178, 186, 206, 244, 261 Cook and Cooke, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11-13, 1, 16, 18,19, 20, 22, 25, 27-37, 39-49, 61, 67, 67, 69, 74, 76, 82-6, 87-96, 97,98, 100-07, 110, 119, 120, 125, 128, 164,169,176, 177, 182-84, 191, 192, 196, 205-08, 213, 222, 230-33, 238, 241, 246, 254, 255, 256,265, 275, 280, 289, 290, 294, 297, 299, 302, 308, 312, 326, 331, 334 Cooper, 73-6, 78, 83,192, 208, 245, 266, 27, 279, 280, 327, 334 Corbett, 223 Corlet, 5, 20 Cornell, 208, 325 Cornwallis, 98, 100 Cotting, 140, 158, 166, 208, 209, 236, 261, 281
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