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ited States and an alliance with the Southern Confederacy. The Council approved of the recommendation, and appointed Commissioners to make a treaty of alliance with the Southern Government. The Confederate Commissioner had assumed the payment of the annuities hitherto received by the Cherokees from the National Government. The Creeks had raised one thousand men for service in the Confederate army, and the Cherokees formed a Home Guard of twelve hundred strong.--(Doc. 63 1/2.) Col. St. George Cooke, of the Utah forces, arrived at St. Louis to-day. His regulars, six hundred strong, will reach Fort Leavenworth in three or four days.--St. Louis Republican, Oct. 2. At Hatteras Inlet the steamer Fanny, with stores for the United States Volunteers on the north coast, was captured by a party of Confederates in their armed steam-tugs. The Fanny was armed with two rifled brass guns, and had on board thirty-five men of the Ninth New York Volunteer regiment. Her crew were mostly c
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
leaving the batteries of Allen, Weedon, Hart, and Edwards, exposed. These made a desperate defense, but, being without support, fell back with a loss of several guns. Then the center bent, and, with the right, fell back in the same direction, toward Alexander's bridge. Seeing this, Porter called up all of his reserved and remaining artillery (about eighty guns in all), covered the retreat of his infantry, and for an instant checked the advance of the victors. Just at that moment General St. George Cooke, without orders, attacked their flank with his cavalry, which was repulsed and thrown into great disorder. The horses, terrified by the tremendous roar of nearly two hundred guns, and the rattle of thousands of muskets, rushed back through the Union batteries, giving Battle of Gaines's Farm. the impression that it was a furious attack of Confederate cavalry. This made the artillerists recoil, and Porter's whole force was pressed back to the river. To this circumstance Porter at
rebels. Boston Evening Journal, July 2, 1863, p. 2, cols. 1-3; p. 3, col. 6; p. 4, cols. 1,2,5. — Engagement of June 27, 28, 1862, at Gaines' Mill, Va. Gen. St. George Cooke corrects Swinton from official documents. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 5, p. 494. — Engagement of June 9, 1863, at Beverly Ford, Va., Brandy Station. An Kate. Our soldiers; hospital. Atlantic, vol. 13, p. 364. Gaines' Mill, Va. Battle of June 27, 28, 1862. See also Peninsula. — – Cavalry at. Gen. St. George Cooke corrects Swinton from official documents. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 5, p. 494. — – Destruction of ammunition and stores by Lieut. Geo. A. Batchelder,F. W. Palfrey, Capt. W. E. Perkins, committee for Mass. Hist. Soc., rev. of. N. Y. Nation, vol. 33, p. 200. —Cavalry at Gaines' Mill, Va., June 27, 28. Gen. St. George Cooke corrects Swinton from official documents. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 5, p. 494. —Citation from Swinton's Army of the Potomac. Army and Navy J
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Cherokee Nation Passes an Ordinance of Secession. (search)
sion pressure. On August 20th, he called his counsel together at Talequah, and sent a message recommending the severance of their connection with the United States, and an alliance with the Southern Confederacy. The Council approved of the recommendation, and appointed Commissioners to make a treaty of alliance with the Southern Confederacy. The Confederate Commissioners assumed the payment of the annuities heretofore received by the Cherokees from our Government. The Creek Indians have raised 10,000 men for service in the Confederate army, and the Cherokees have formed a home guard, 1,200 strong. It appears that the troops sent into Arkansas by Ben. McCulloch, after the battle of Springfield, were posted on the border of the Cherokee Nation to intimidate the Council and force John Ross to yield to the demands of the rebels. Colonel St. George Cooke. of the Utah, forces, arrived to-day. His regulars, 600 in number, will reach Leavenworth in three or four days.
fices. To-day an order reached the Department from Pittsburg for 10,000 more. Emigrants have rushed from all directions to Nevada since the discovery of the rich mines in that Territory, and many of them have settled upon lands for agricultural purposes. The Commissioner of the Land Office has directed that such lands shall be surveyed, to the end that there shall be come rules by which the rights of occupants may be determined. As it is, all is confusion. The regiment of Col. St. George Cooke, which has reached us from Utah, looks much battered and ware, but it is not the corps for sufficient military The officers, who says been open years of hard duty in and have stopped the on shelf at the average of miles a day in all kinds of weather, find that persons whom they ranked six months since are now far above them, though not having experienced anything like the hardships of the former. Senator Harris, of New York, is at the Willard House. Senator Chandler, of